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  • 1 Jan 1990—14 Feb 2017

1956 Ferrari 290 MM by Scaglietti

*Premium Lot – Bidding via Internet will not be available for this lot. Should you have any questions please contact Client Services. 320 bhp, 3,490 cc SOHC 60-degree Type 130 dry-sump V-12 engine with triple Weber twin-choke 46 DCF3 carburetors and twin spark-plug ignition with quad Magneti-Marelli distributors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with helical springs and anti-roll bar, De Dion rear axle with transverse leaf spring, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 92.52 in. 1956 Mille Miglia, Juan Manuel Fangio, 4th-overall Extensive and documented racing history An irrefutable piece of automotive history Ferrari Classiche certified Ferrari’s sports-prototype racing cars are among the most legendary in motorsport history as they epitomize the desire, passion, and mechanical brilliance that the Maranello team could bring to bear on the track. Most significantly, each and every design had Enzo’s personal handprint upon them. However, some cars are more special than others, and it is the Works cars that are considered the “Holy Grail” of Ferrari motoring. These iconic cars were on the frontline, the weapons of choice—the sharpest in the armory. They would carry the hopes and prayers of not only the Factory but also of Italy itself and would only be driven by the finest in the world. The Works Ferrari Prototypes were campaigned in the World Sportscar Championship with enormous success, on the greatest, most challenging, and most important circuits that today still provide the foundation and heritage of motorsport as we know it. SCUDERIA FERRARI: CHASSIS NUMBER 0626 The 290 MM was built to contest the World Sportscar Championship, which was as important and carried as much weight to Ferrari as his efforts to win the Formula One World Championship. The WSC was inaugurated in 1953, and Ferrari was immediately successful with championship wins in 1953 and 1954. However, in 1955, the goalposts moved in staggering style as the Germanic efficiency of Mercedes-Benz dominated three of the six events, claiming the World Championship in the process. Then, just as Mercedes-Benz retired at the end of 1955, the old enemy Maserati entered a new machine in the form of the fabulous 300S. Ferrari recognized that it needed a new weapon if it was to reclaim its glory. For 1956, at the suggestion of a returning engineer, the legendary Vittorio Jano, Enzo took the decision to revert to his thunderous trademark V-12 engine after developing various four- and six-cylinder Mondials, Monzas, and 118/121 LMs. Jano and engineer Andrea Fraschetti created an all-new engine, although it followed the principles inaugurated by Aurelio Lampredi, with an integral block and cylinder heads with screwed-in wet liners. The new engine was shorter and wider than the previous Lampredi designs, with considerable effort being put into the combustion chamber design to improve inlet and exhaust valve function. Additionally, two spark plugs per cylinder were fitted, with the net result being a 40 brake horsepower increase over the similarly sized 860 Monza. Enzo convinced the best driver of the era, and, for most, arguably the greatest driver who ever lived, the soon to be five-time World Champion Juan Manuel Fangio, to lead the Works team in his latest and greatest creation. With that, so it was that Fangio and the 290 MM came together with the sole purpose of securing the 1956 World Sportscar Championship for the Maranello Scuderia. In today’s heavily regulated world of motorsport, it is wonderful to reflect on the fact that in the 1950s there were few rules to govern the Works teams in the design of their latest racecars. These wonderful machines were therefore developed to the absolute limit of what was achievable, with no rules governing cylinder capacity or weight. The only limiting factor was the bravery of the driver and his ability to read the road ahead on some of the most challenging events for both car and driver that have ever existed. One such event was the legendary Mille Miglia. XXIII MILLE MIGLIA The 1956 Mille Miglia was held on April 29th and was the third round of the World Sportscar Championship. For this event, Fangio was allocated chassis number 0626, a car that was specifically built with him, and the car offered here today. There were 426 cars entered for the event, of which 365 would start, but only 182 would be classified as finishers. Juan Manuel Fangio was race #600 and would start last, at exactly 06:00 am, driving solo, with no navigator to call the turns and hazards that led in front. The race was intense from the onset, with the weather immediately deteriorating to torrential rain throughout Italy. The closed cars had a distinct advantage, but the Ferraris were still supremely competitive and would take the top five places with Fangio bringing home 0626 in 4th place overall. A remarkable feat considering the conditions and that he was driving unaccompanied. Less than a month later, an incredible photo essay by LIFE magazine photographer Thomas McAvoy chronicled the Scuderia Ferrari’s trip from the 1956 BRDC International Trophy of Silverstone right up to its recent domination and victory at the XXIII Mille Miglia. Three cars from the Mille Miglia were featured heavily, but Enzo Ferrari chose to rest against one specific car for the photoshoot, and that car was 0626 (#600), as can be seen pictured here. The next outing for chassis number 0626 was at the 2nd International ADAC 1000 KM at the Nürburgring, held at the end of May, where it was driven by future American World Champion Phil Hill, Ken Wharton, Olivier Gendebien, and the Marquis Alfonso de Portago. This spectacular roster of drivers finished 3rd overall, but the season was not over, and there were yet more incredibly talented drivers to sit behind the wheel. In July, de Portago once again took the wheel and finished 9th overall at the 5th International Grand Prix of Rouen-Les Essarts in France. Wolfgang Alexander Albert Eduard Maxamilian Reichsgraf Berghe (Taffy) von Trips was to become one of Germany’s all-time great Grand Prix drivers, winning the Targa Florio and even challenging for the World Championship until his untimely death at the Italian GP in 1961. But, in 1956, he had yet to drive a Ferrari. That was until he convinced Enzo to allow him to get behind the wheel of chassis 0626 at the Swedish GP at Kristianstad, the final race of the World Championship. He was partnered with the dashing Peter Collins, and the pair did not fail to impress with a 2nd place finish, which helped Ferrari secure the 1956 World Sportscar Championship, exactly as Enzo had set out to do. Nonetheless, chassis number 0626 was not finished as part of the Scuderia’s Worlds Sportscar Championship efforts just yet, forming part of the team that contested the 1957 title. For the opening round of the season, the IV Mil Kilometros Ciudad de Buenos Aires, 0626 was entered in Works livery for the fast American Masten “Kansas City Flash” Gregory, who was partnered by two Ferrari Grand Prix drivers, Eugenio Castelloti and Luigi Musso. These three great drivers raced chassis number 0626 to a famous championship victory, and Ferrari’s 1957 sports-racing campaign was off to a glorious start. This tremendous form would continue throughout 1957, and Ferrari would go on to secure yet another championship. In spring 1957, chassis number 0626 was sold through Luigi Chinetti to Temple Buell in New York, who had the car repainted blue and white. Buell had many great Ferraris, such as a 750 Monza and 500 TR; most importantly, he was a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. Under Buell’s ownership, this car continued to compete around the world, including a 2nd place finish in both the VI Portuguese Grand Prix and RACB Grand Prix of Spa-Francorchamps, as well as earning respectable finishes at the Nassau Tourist Trophy and the Cuban Grand Prix, when Juan Manuel Fangio was kidnapped prior to the start of the race by Fidel Castro’s movement. Throughout this season, the car was driven by Masten Gregory, Joakim Bonnier, Paul O’Shea, and Manfredo Lippman. In March 1958, Temple Buell returned the car to Luigi Chinetti Motors, who sold the car to J. Robert Williams of Miami, Florida. Chassis number 0626 then passed through the hands of enthusiastic American racer James Flynn and continued to be raced up until 1964, maintaining her almost unique record of never being crashed and as such maintaining her level of incredible originality. In 1968, repainted red, the 290 MM was sold to well-known collector Bob Dusek of Solebury, Pennsylvania. Mr. Dusek maintained chassis number 0626 for a couple of years, even using her regularly on the “school run!” The significance of 0626 can be gauged by the fact that in 1970 she was then purchased by the world-renowned collector Pierre Bardinon for his renowned Collection Mas du Clos in Aubusson, France. Chassis number 0626 was displayed alongside Bardinon’s extensive collection of Ferrari Le Mans winners at the 1987 Cartier Hommage à Ferrari exhibit held near Paris. Bardinon owned this magnificent car for 34 years before it passed to the present custodian, who is one of the world’s most renowned and discerning collectors of Ferrari and its history. For the past 12 years, chassis number 0626 has been regularly maintained, benefiting from a recent engine rebuild. The provision of a removable passenger screen has also allowed her to comfortably compete in the Mille Miglia Storica, and she has run at various historic events as well as been displayed at the Goodwood Revival Meeting and the remarkable inaugural Windsor Concours of Elegance. The owner has had the car Ferrari Classiche certified to further confirm its stunning originality. Works Ferrari sports-racing cars of the 1950s are rare in their own right, but one with such heritage and degree of originality is almost unheard of. In May 2016, Fangio’s epic drive in the Mille Miglia 60 years beforehand will be celebrated once again in Brescia. Chassis number 0626 surely stands to capture the hearts and admiration of all who appreciate this unique and original example of a Factory Prototype, created by the world’s greatest racecar manufacturer for the world’s greatest racing driver. Chassis no. 0626 Engine no. 0626 Gearbox no. 10 7 S

  • USANew York, USA
  • 2015-12-10

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider by Scaglietti

300 bhp 3,286 cc four overhead-camshaft V-12 engine, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and tubular steel frame. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Single-ownership from new Purchased new by Eddie Smith Sr., of North Carolina Matching-numbers, fully restored example One of only 10 highly desirable N.A.R.T. Spiders ever built Proceeds to benefit charity It’s a Monday morning in March 1968 and Eddie Smith Sr., known to his family and friends affectionately as “George,” has arrived at work well before dawn. As he has for so many years, he and several volunteers are making the employees breakfast to start the work week with a smile: 150 biscuits, 17 dozen scrambled eggs, and all the sausages, gravy, grits, and fixings to feed a booming hosiery mail-order business in the small town of Lexington, North Carolina. Parked at his office, by the way, is a brand new Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider, one of only ten in the world, which he just acquired from his friend and fellow enthusiast, legendary Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti. The story of chassis 10709, one of the most famous and desirable Ferraris in the world, is as much about the provenance of a sports car as it is the remarkable life story of the gentleman who cherished it from the day he took delivery and from whose beloved family it is now offered to the public. It represents not only the ownership of a sports car for all the right reasons, but also, on a much greater level, the shared multi-generational passion that 10709 has encouraged within the family, and the American Dream that it signifies. From Hardscrabble to Hosiery Eddie Smith was born in 1918, one of four siblings, into a poor but loving family. His parents died tragically within one year of each other, well before young Eddie had even turned 10 years old. Thankfully, the Junior Order, of which his father was a member, arranged to have the children sent to an orphanage together, which was, in fact, a blessing, as he later considered it one of the happiest times of his life. Rising every morning at 4:30 to milk cows and tend to the usual farm chores was hard work, but it was relatively short-lived, as his son, Eddie Jr., recently recalled. “When you were 18, your birthday present was the door! They couldn’t afford to keep you, so my dad found his way to the nearest town of Lexington, and that’s where he built his life and started working.” Eddie Sr. started first as an usher at the Carolina Theater in town, where he met his future wife, Sarah, before spending some time as a cab driver, which segued into a dispatcher position and finally the role of manager. Eddie, however, clearly had greater things in mind. He worked his way up the street and found employment with a man who owned a small mail-order hosiery business. Eight years later, he found himself out of work due to the death of the owner and was about to make a career leap that changed everything. In 1952, he and two other partners started their own mail-order hosiery business, which they named the National Wholesale Company. Castrol Fever Fast-forward eight years. Eddie’s business is thriving, he’s bought out his partners, and the company has expanded into lingerie and other apparel. He’s become a daring businessman that has tremendous foresight to seize on expansion opportunities when they present themselves, and time after time, his gambles pay off. One day, in the spring of 1960, he was asked by his son, Eddie Jr., if he would be allowed to attend the 12 Hours of Sebring in Florida with several friends. Eddie Sr. said yes, but he also decided to tag along, and the entire gang headed south in a 1960 Impala Tri-Power 348 with a four on the floor. Immediately enamored, Eddie Jr. later recalled, “He smelled that Castrol burning and it got in his blood!” The father-son duo returned the following year, this time in a new Chevrolet Corvette, but as John Lamm wrote for Road & Track in 1998, “Senior’s tastes were changing. ‘I don’t know what it was, but you hear about the Ferrari mystique…at first we didn’t know much about sports cars, but we’d see Ferraris and they were winning. I’d hear about Jaguars and others, but I always wanted a Ferrari.’” Eddie Sr. satisfied this craving by buying a stunning used 250 GT Short Wheelbase California Spider, which was facilitated by one of the many friends the Smiths were making in the pits and the party tents at the annual races in Sebring, none other than North American Ferrari importer and renowned racing driver Luigi Chinetti. As everyone who met him came to find out, “George” had an absolutely infectious personality; he had a fun-loving effusiveness, a gift for telling stories, and non-stop energy that made him the life of every party, even at those of his son and grandson’s fraternity at Chapel Hill! The $7,000 California Spider was later sold to a fraternity brother of Eddie Jr.’s for $5,600. It was replaced by an equally worthy stable mate, the latest 12-cylindered supercar from Maranello, a 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta, for which delivery proved a much more exciting proposition. “George” was invited directly by Chinetti to join him on the first of several high-speed European tours, the likes of which petrol-heads and Ferraristi can only dream of. As illustrated by an extraordinary family photo album, the two of them, along with Don Weber of Texas, arrived in Paris, from where they drove a then-new front-wheel drive Oldsmobile Toronado nonstop and at breakneck speed toward Modena. After several days of long lunches, dinners, and nights out with Ferrari executives at the Hotel Real Fini, the trio picked up three brand-new 275 GTB/4 Berlinettas, drove over the border into Switzerland, and enjoyed the twisty Alpine roads on their way to Geneva. After a quick stopover, it was back to Paris at high-revving speed, before Eddie’s stunning new car was loaded onto a ship on the coast, homeward bound. In all, Eddie and Luigi romped around Europe in their prancing horses three times; the last time was in 1972, with the new 365 GTB/4 Daytona Coupe, co-driven this time by Eddie Jr. In an endless array of stories about Eddie Sr. that could fill countless volumes, Eddie Jr. recalled how, on two separate daytrips, the father-son team roared through a tunnel at breakneck speed on their way to Florence (unable to find the light switch!) and put the pedal to the metal, chasing a Dino, whose driver had made the mistake of passing the Smiths on the Autostrada, at 140+ mph, on their way to visit the Riva boat factory. N.A.R.T. Spider Amazingly, the most extraordinary car Eddie ever bought simply came into his possession as a matter of personal preference. He owned the four-cam berlinetta for only a very short period of time before Luigi Chinetti came calling once again, recalling Eddie’s love of convertibles. “I talked Enzo into building some spiders. Do you want one?” His protestations at having just bought the berlinetta were met with, “I’ll give you your money back!” And so, Luigi and Eddie headed overseas once more to take delivery of chassis 10709, what would become one of the most famous Ferraris in the world. After the usual stopover in Paris, and a high-speed jaunt through the countryside to Northern Italy, what George found in Maranello was no ordinary cabriolet. This new model was unlike anything Ferrari had built before. Road & Track magazine called it “the most satisfying sports car in the world” and featured it on their cover. In fact, this was the first chassis that had been raced by Denise McCluggage and Pinkie Rollo very successfully at Sebring, and it was later featured in the Steve McQueen film The Thomas Crown Affair. In speaking with RM Auctions recently, Denise commented, “I love the look of the car, and it’s absolutely perfect for all the great driving events, from the Colorado Grand to the California Mille. Even with the top down, you can outrun the rain and stay perfectly dry.” Meanwhile, McQueen loved the car so much that he bought his own example, chassis 10453, not long thereafter. Like so many great sports car importers, Luigi Chinetti recognized the viability of sporty open cars in the American market. The 250 GT SWB California Spider in particular proved itself a resounding success, and to this day, it is one of the most breathtakingly beautiful cars to ever come from Modena. But whereas the four-cam’s predecessor, the 275 GTB, offered a spider variant, the wind-in-your-hair alternative to the 275 GTB/4 was a 330 GTS. As such, the N.A.R.T. Spider was born of a direct request from Luigi Chinetti to offer his buyers precisely what they wanted. Adding the recognizable North American Racing Team badge to the back of the car certainly helped its cache. N.A.R.T., after all, was one of endurance racing’s most successful teams, with a banner campaigned by the likes of the Rodriguez Brothers, Bob Grossman, Masten Gregory, Phil Hill, Jean Guichet, and many others. In all, only 10 cars were built, making them incredibly rare. As Luigi Chinetti Jr. recently recounted, “As an open version of the 275 GTB, it’s a very romantic car. To this day, many people think it’s the prettiest car ever made, and certainly the romance with the little prancing horse in the center of the steering wheel is a very powerful thing. It signifies history and design.” This particular “prancing horse” was originally finished in Azzurro Metallizzato (Metallic Blue), and when Eddie picked the car up, it was also fitted with a chromed front grille guard, which it wears to this day. Years later, as concours judges protested the fitment of this grille guard, Eddie, in his typical good-humored way, declared, “Well, if that’s not original, I’ll be as surprised as you are, because it was on there when I picked the car up myself in Modena!” As Eddie headed north on the Autostrada toward the Swiss border, as per usual, he was most certainly delighting in the finest motor car he had ever driven. With over 300 horsepower, a four-cam, 3.2-liter V-12 fed by six Weber carburetors, a five-speed gearbox, and four-wheel independent suspension, this Ferrari was miles away from anything anyone in Lexington, North Carolina, could have ever dreamed of. The wail of the motor under full acceleration was surely something he delighted in immensely, as Eddie’s daughter, Lynda Swann, recalled. “One of the things he loved most about his Ferraris was the sound. You could hear the N.A.R.T. from several blocks away!” Three Generations of Ferraristi After 10709 was delivered to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York, Eddie took delivery in March 1968 and headed down to the endurance races at Sebring not long thereafter. He would return two or three times, always with Eddie Jr., who said, “We must have broken the land speed record between Lexington and Sebring on more than one occasion.” The Daytona would come and go, but the N.A.R.T. Spider remained in the family through to the present day. Eddie, in the meantime, had become an ardent supporter and beloved member of the Ferrari Club of America, attending many of its events, reunions, and track days. By the 1980s, he had refinished the car a darker red/maroon metallic color, and it was pictured as such at an FCA national meeting and reunion of N.A.R.T. road and racing cars at Lake Lanier Island in Georgia. Many events followed, including the 30th Annual FCA National Meet in Palm Beach Gardens in 1993, the third annual Cavallino Classic the following year, and the 31st FCA International Concours in Monterey, California. He returned to Cavallino many more times, including Road Atlanta in 1999, the 40th Annual FCA Concours at Sebring in 2003 (where he won the Luigi Chinetti Memorial Award), and Virginia International Raceway in 2004, where he won Best in Show. Many awards were won, parties were attended, and dances were enjoyed. Meanwhile, Eddie Smith Jr. was forging his own path to success. Not long after the N.A.R.T. Spider arrived in North Carolina, the recent college graduate ventured out on his own and bought the struggling Grady-White boat company; it was a company that he not only turned around, but he also led the charge, as he has pioneered industry-leading advancements, manufacturing techniques and unparalleled customer service that have garnered the company J.D. Power & Associates awards every year they’ve been available. Through it all, 10709 remained part of the family, as Eddie tended to National Wholesale, which is now run by his daughter, Lynda. Eddie Jr. employed the same values and hard work as his father to build Grady-White into what it is today, joining the National Marine Manufacturers Hall of Fame in the process and following in his father’s footsteps, who was inducted into the Direct Mail Hall of Fame. Eddie Jr.’s company employs hundreds of dedicated individuals, many of whom have remained with him for decades, including its current president, Kris Carroll. With an emphasis on safety and catering to the needs of the active sport fisherman, Grady-White is unique in that it also espouses its owners’ values of preserving the environment and fisheries for generations to come. In fact, it’s certainly no surprise that the same family that founded National Wholesale, and started every work week with a generous southern breakfast, also built Grady-White into what it is today, with a commitment to ensure every employee comes to work on Monday as happy as they were when they left on Friday. Chris Smith has shared the same passion as his father and grandfather, not only for the N.A.R.T. Spider, but also to the University of North Carolina, the family business, and the values that have kept the family so close. He fondly recalls a high school date to the ice cream shop, where he was scolded by several old-timers, who said, “Do you know whose car that is? You’d better polish it before you return it!” The list of family anecdotes is heartwarming and exceptional to say the least, but it is suffice to say that “George’s” ownership of the N.A.R.T Spider came full circle on his 70th birthday, when Eddie Jr. surprised him with a brand new Ferrari Testarossa. Ten years later, on his 80th birthday, he surprised him once more with a Ferrari F355 F1 Spider. An Infectious Personality As noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini recalled, “He was a very nice gentleman, a true Ferrari aficionado with a big heart. It was certainly very rare that a Ferrari owner belonged to the club for so long and was active for over 40 years.” Indeed, Eddie Smith Sr. bought and owned this Ferrari for all the right reasons: he enjoyed the camaraderie of the club, but, most importantly, he derived pleasure from flying around the roads in Lexington, listening to the high-revving V-12 and enjoying the car’s stunning good looks. Most long-term FCA members will attest to the wonderful stories “George” told of Luigi Chinetti and his early Ferrari experiences, and their wives will happily recount what a tireless dancer he was. Just as he didn’t leave the dance floor until the party was over, his foot never came off the throttle until it was absolutely necessary! His need for speed was so great that instead of buckling up during takeoff in his private Sabreliner jet, he would stand up in the cockpit, between the two pilots, to experience the surge of acceleration as they were going down the runway. As Luigi Chinetti Jr. recently said, “He was always happy and a true pleasure to be around. He wasn’t just an enthusiast about the cars themselves but the entire experience—the drives around Europe and the visits to the factory. He was a really nifty guy!” A New Home As the value of his N.A.R.T. Spider began to rise, he never once considered parting with it, even when notable celebrities made him offers that most owners wouldn’t refuse. After Steve McQueen was rear-ended at a stoplight in his own N.A.R.T. Spider, he called Eddie, whose car was currently being built. Eddie told him “Steve, I like you but I don’t love you. And you can’t have my car!” Since “George’s” passing in 2007, the car has been stored and maintained in a separate, purpose-built garage within Grady-White’s airplane hangar, as a monument, of sorts, to his ownership of the car; it is complete with his racing suit and beloved worn deck shoes in which he wore when he so frequently drove around the track. A recent inspection by both an RM specialist and a Ferrari expert confirmed the exceptional condition of the car and how well it has been preserved over the course of its life. The restoration was conducted to the highest standards, and enormous effort was used to ensure that even the smallest replaced part, right down to an old bearing, was retained. The body lines are excellent, and the car’s presentation is thoroughly correct. It runs and drives nicely, pulling through the gears with tremendous power and stopping without issue, and most importantly, the car has the distinction of having full matching numbers from front to back; the gearbox, body, and engine stampings all correspond with chassis 10709. For further details and a list of parts that accompany the car, please speak with an RM specialist. In recent years, the car has been seen by the public only on limited occasions. Just last year, Eddie Jr. had the car brought to Savannah, Georgia, for an FCA meet, where he was joined by Chris, Lynda, and all of their children and grandchildren. The entire family and Ferrari community celebrated “George’s” life, but, as Eddie recalls, “Those people enjoyed the car so much that it almost brought them to tears. So we decided the car needs to be somewhere where it can be seen and appreciated.” The experience in Savannah consequently compelled the family to part with the car, and in a final act of supreme generosity for which the Smith family is known, they will donate the proceeds to charity. “The hard part was deciding to let the car go after 45 years, but it’s been in prison in that hangar. ‘George’ always taught us to give back, and by giving all the money to several charities, we know that it would have brought a smile to his face.” Eddie Smith Sr. certainly set an example for philanthropy in the family. Untold children found their way through college with his assistance, or they enjoyed the failing theater in Lexington, North Carolina, which he helped resurrect. As a result, that theater was subsequently named in his honor and turned into a first-class civic center. A new hospital was built with his assistance in Lexington, North Carolina, and the same was true of a new library. In fact, after discovering a battered woman by the side of the road in Lexington on his morning jog, he helped not only her, but countless others, when he kicked off a fundraiser that resulted in the building of a local shelter for women in similar situations. An Unrepeatable Opportunity Ferraris are bought and sold internationally at staggering rates, but their perpetual desirability is attested to by the fact that the vast majority of important examples are not only known and accounted for, but that they are also well documented by historians and enthusiasts. This is especially true of the 350 275 GTB/4s and, more specifically, the 10 additional N.A.R.T. Spiders, which irrefutably signify a holy grail for collectors of road going Ferraris. Add to that 10709’s exceptional purity, matching numbers, and, most importantly, the fact that it has been owned, cherished, and enjoyed in the same good home from the day it was picked up at the factory by its first owner; this is an owner who, much like the buyer of an FXX or 599 GTO, was personally asked by Ferrari whether he would like to buy such a car. For the true Ferrari enthusiast, 10709’s offering at auction is quite simply an unrepeatable and almost unbelievable opportunity. For a complete list of spare parts, please speak with an RM representative. Addendum Please note: if you intend to bid on this lot, you need to register your interest with RM Auctions no less than 48 hours in advance of the sale by calling +1 519 352 4575 and asking to speak with a Client Services representative or emailing clientservices@rmauctions.com. There will be no Internet bidding available for this lot. Chassis no. 10709 Engine no. 10709

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2013-08-16

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti

320 hp, Type 213/Comp 3,286 lightweight block V-12 engine with six Weber 38 DCN carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. An historic, unique, and unrepeatable opportunity to acquire such an important automobile The first of only three Works berlinetta competizione cars built; rarer than its 250 GTO siblings Known provenance from new; original matching-numbers engine A superb historic racing and rallying entrant Meticulously researched by Swiss Ferrari historian Marcel Massini Please note, internet bidding will not be offered on this lot. Interested parties wishing to bid remotely are encouraged to bid via telephone or absentee. Please click here to register. Few motor cars in the world possess such intrinsic desirability that their availability at auction sends shockwaves through the community of automotive enthusiasts around the world; fewer still are so exceptionally rare, fast, and achingly beautiful that they attain legendary status. These select few motor cars, at the highest point on the capstone of the collector car pyramid, represent the benchmark from which all superlatives in automotive history are born. They are, quite inarguably, the most important cars in the world. Even within this exclusive group, 06701 stands out among its peers. Without even considering its almost unbelievable rarity, its matching numbers, its breathtaking design, or the pedigree of its family tree, it not only counts the 250 GTO series among its brothers but, more immediately, the two other 275 GTB/C Speciales, successors to the GTO, neither of which are likely to ever come up for sale and one of which holds a record that remains unbroken at Le Mans after a half century! THE GTO ’65 The era into which 06701 was born saw Ferrari not only dominate endurance racing but experience a serious challenge from the American Ford-powered teams in both the prototype and GT classes. The all-conquering 250 GTO had won the GT class three years in a row, and Ferrari’s P-series of sports prototype racing cars were exceptionally formidable as well, but Carroll Shelby’s Cobra Daytonas and the persistent development of the Ford GT40 always had the gentlemen from Maranello looking in their rearview mirrors. Ferrari knew it had a chance for victory in 1965 with a new competition-ready version of its 275 GTB, which was to be released at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1964. As the first Ferrari with an independent rear suspension and a transaxle gearbox, it was a major improvement over the outgoing 250-series and a superb evolution of the front-engined 250 GTO. During late 1964 and early 1965, Ferrari built three 275 GTB/C Speciales, specifically for FIA homologation and factory development, each boasting unique details from the standard 275 GTB/Cs that would follow. All were fitted with super-lightweight aluminum bodywork, a Tipo 563 chassis constructed of smaller and lighter tubes, and the type 213/Comp dry-sump engine topped with six Weber carburetors first seen in the 250 LM, which was mounted lower in the chassis to lower the car’s center of gravity. This engine was specifically developed with big valves and cylinder heads, like the 250 GTO or 250 LM, 9.7:1 compression ratio pistons, the already well-tested Tipo 130 camshaft (10mm lift), and most of the auxiliary casings made in magnesium. With 70 additional horsepower powering a chassis that was lighter in all respects to the standard 275 GTB road car, this was undoubtedly the most formidable weapon in Ferrari’s competition arsenal. As Giancarlo Rosetti stated in his Forza article entitled “Legend of the GTO ’65,” “while the GTB/C Speciales were built on 275 chassis and fitted with 3.3-liter motors, it’s easy to see where they evolved from.” Completed in April 1965, chassis 06701, present here, was the first of the three 275 GTB/C Speciales built. It uniquely hand built in all respects, as were the two cars that followed. As per the build sheet, the car was originally fitted with a 250 LM type exhaust with side pipes. Its rear fender shared a very similar profile with the ’64 250 GTOs, as did its front end, which also bore some resemblance to that of a 330 LMB. For added ventilation to the brakes, two oval slots were cut in the nose and another three vents behind the rear wheels. Additionally, the car features an outside aluminum fuel filler cap, specific to the 140-liter fuel tank, to allow for faster fueling during pit stops and a stunningly sculpted air-intake on the hood. Inside, a pair of GTO-style aluminum bucket seats holds both driver and passenger firmly in position. All told, Ferrari had arranged a powerful arsenal for Le Mans. The 275 GTB/C would ideally run in the GT class and the 250 LM in the prototype class. They were determined to dominate not just one but both categories. With the FIA still incensed from Ferrari’s attempts to incorrectly homologate the 250 GTO and 250 LM, however, the 275 GTB/C Speciales were not granted homologation, as the car submitted was considerably under the dry weight stated for the road-going 275 GTB in Ferrari’s own sales literature. Determined to see the car compete, Ferrari offered to accept homologation at the weight stated for the road-going 275 GTB, but the FIA refused and Ferrari decided that it would not compete in the 1965 season in the GT class. Eventually, both sides would reach a compromise by June of 1965, but only chassis 06885 would see competitive action during that season. Although its racing career was brief, 06885 quickly proved the potency of the Speciales, finishing an incredible third overall at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans, a record that has stood ever since as the best finish by a front-engined car. Chassis 06701, meanwhile, was sold directly from the factory to Pietro Ferraro of Trieste, Italy, in May of 1965, who registered it on the plate “TS 75946” and proceeded to use the car exclusively on the road. It was registered to Cartiere del Timavo, his paper producing company. Prior to the car’s sale, it is believed that the car’s exterior color was changed by the factory from its original Rosso Cina to Grigio Scurro Metalizatto. Furthermore, the factory also fitted front half bumpers and full rear bumpers, indicating that the car would be used by its first private owner on the road. Ferraro passed the car to Alessandro Gregori in 1969, and around this time the car had gained a silver band over its grey paint. Gregori owned the car for just two months but registered it in Vicenza with the registration “VI 167868” for further road use. Chassis 06701 then traveled to the United Kingdom, where it was sold to Colonel E.B. Wilson of London, who then passed the car to long-term owner Michel Pobrejeski of Boulogne-Billancourt, who retained the car for 25 years. Within about the first decade of its life, three GTO style nose vents were cut into the bodywork, in order to provide better ventilation to the engine—a welcome improvement to the car, as demonstrated at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans where the mechanics of Ecurie Francorchamps cut a progressively wider cooling inlet in the bonnet of 06885 over the course of the race. At that time, Pobrejeski also had the car repainted red. Respected Ferrari collector Brandon Wang would be the next owner of 06701, and he immediately decided to campaign the car in historic events. He entered it in the International Historic Festival at Goodwood and later at Tutte Le Ferrari in Mugello. Chassis 06701 proved to be highly competitive, and in an article written about the car in Cavallino (issue 110), Ferrari historian Keith Bluemel specifically mentioned its outing at Goodwood, stating that, “If a parallel could be drawn with its performance in the race to what it might have achieved during the 1965 season, then it would have been a very competitive package.” The following year, the car took to the Nürburgring for the Ferrari Racing Days and Shell Historic Challenge. In Mr. Wang’s ownership, the car was also shown at the VIII Automobiles Classiques Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance in Paris. In 1997, while still in the ownership of Brandon Wang, 06701 was driven on the Tour Auto by Derek Hill with his father and 1961 Formula One World Champion Phil Hill riding along as navigator. Wang decided to restore the car upon its return, opting to refinish the car in its highly attractive two-tone silver and grey color scheme that the car wore earlier in its life. Following the completion of the restoration in 1998, the car was purchased by another noted collector and was displayed at the FCA National Concours in Los Angeles in May of 2002. The year 2005 brought about two more public appearances for 06701, and it was displayed at the 14th Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach in January and was on the track at Laguna Seca for the Monterey Historic Races in August. Since then, 06701 has been carefully preserved by its current owner, who, like his predecessors, is a connoisseur of other fine, rare automobiles. RARITY IN THE EXTREME Notwithstanding the 275 GTB/C’s extraordinary racing capability and bespoke scuderia Ferrari character, 06701 is a car whose inclusion in these pages will almost certainly never happen again, particularly since its two sister cars are very unlikely to become available. Chassis 06885 has been owned since 1970 by noted enthusiast Preston Henn, who has clearly stated that he intends to continue enjoying the jewel of his collection, which some enthusiasts speculate may be the first motor car of any kind to sell for the magic “nine-figure” mark, should it ever become available. The third and final car of the series, chassis 07185, is also part of a prominent private collection and is likewise very unlikely to be sold in the near future. This, then, renders 06701 the only opportunity to acquire this unbelievably rare evolution of the GTO concept, the 275 GTB/C Speciale—a model whose brief stint at Le Mans proved so dominant that its record stands to this day. It is a model so attractive, so fast, so rare, and so superior in every respect that it may rightfully be considered one of the most important cars in the world. Chassis no. 06701 Engine no. 06701 Internal engine no. 044/64

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2014-08-15

1955 Jaguar D-Type

250 bhp, 3,442 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber 45 DCO3 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension, live rear axle trailing links and transverse torsion bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. Legendary overall winner of the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans, raced by Ecurie Ecosse Just two private owners since Ecurie Ecosse; in the same private collection for over 16 years The only Le Mans-winning C- or D-Type that has survived intact and remained essentially original to its winning form The first team-series production D-Type and the first to be designated by its chassis as a D-Type Unequivocally one of the most important and valuable Jaguars in the world 28 JULY 1956 The 24 Hours of Le Mans, the world’s most prestigious and legendary endurance race, starts at four o’clock in the afternoon and it’s raining—an inauspicious start to an already exceptionally dangerous motor race. With 60 years of competition history, the starting grid at La Sarthe is utterly jaw-dropping—legends like de Portago, Trintignant, Gendebien, von Trips, Hill, Maglioli, Behra, Fangio, and Castelloti are piloting prototype and production machinery with names like Ferrari, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Talbot, Porsche, Lotus, and Gordini. This is the golden age of motor-racing—the era of an unbroken Mulsanne Straight, mind-bending speeds, and supreme, life-risking danger in pursuit of eternal glory. This won’t be an easy race, and the men on the starting grid, about to sprint across the front stretch and jump into their cars, know it. After all, 49 cars will start the race and only 14 will finish. One man will lose his life. One of the most stunningly beautiful cars on the grid was the formidable Jaguar D-Type, swathed in traditional Scottish blue with a white cross, the traditional colors of the Ecurie Ecosse outfit. Standing across the track is Ron Flockhart, one of its two drivers, an Edinburgh-born driver who might not have known it, but he was on his way to consecutive Le Mans wins. Quite the adventurer, several years, later, he would make two attempts at breaking the flight record from Sydney, Australia, to London, England, in a war-era P51 Mustang. The Glasgow-born Ninian Sanderson was also on hand, Flockhart’s teammate, and by all accounts his polar opposite. A practical joker with a biting sense of humor, but with the same spirit for adventure . . . a yachtsman, he raced regattas on the Clyde Coast of Scotland. There they stand, two privateer entries in the competitive field, about to begin a 24-hour battle in conditions that Motor Sport Magazine described in September 1956 as “terrible, with rain and mist, and driving at all, let alone racing, was a nightmare . . . . How drivers can take a quick two or three hours’ sleep and then go on again defies explanation!” CRAFTING A LE MANS WINNER Following their win at Le Mans in 1953, where Duncan Hamilton and Tony Rolt led a veritable parade of C-Types to three of the top four finishes, Jaguar faced a problem. It was evident that the limits of the XK 120-based race car had been reached, and that to remain competitive at Le Mans, a new car would be required. While the C-Type had been one of the first cars of its era to employ a steel-tube space-frame, its successor was perhaps the first to claim unitary monocoque construction, with the body and frame combining for structural integrity. The successful and proven 3.4-liter XK engine was retained, but now fitted with triple Weber carburetors good for 245 horsepower. A dry-sump lubrication system was also adapted that reduced height, allowing the engine to be mounted lower, and correspondingly reducing the overall profile and coefficient of drag. It was clear that the design was effective when one of the new cars hit 169 mph on the Mulsanne Straight at the Le Mans trials in April 1954. As the previous Jaguar had been called the C-Type for “competition,” the new Jaguar was dubbed the D-Type. The D-Type made its debut at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, where Rolt and Hamilton were tasked with repeating their victory of the prior year. However, all three of Jaguar’s team entries were plagued with firing problems, and two of the D-Types retired before the #14 car of Hamilton and Rolt was adequately sorted to contend. As 4:00 p.m. approached on Sunday afternoon, the D-Type and the powerful 4.9-liter Ferrari 375 Plus driven by Froilan Gonzales and Maurice Trintignant were far ahead of two Cunninghams, a Gordini, and the Garage Francorchamps’ C-Type. After all was said and done, the Ferrari had only a narrow lead over the D-Type, besting the Jaguar in one of the closest Le Mans finishes ever. Six team cars were constructed for 1954, with chassis numbers in the range of XKD 401 through 406. In 1955, Jaguar began selling team and customer cars with 3.4-liter carbureted engines as the company gradually established the production minimum necessary to satisfy FIA homologation requirements. Fifty-four such cars were eventually built, with chassis numbers starting at XKD 501 (the first privateer team car). The factory simultaneously developed a version of the car for its competition purposes, most immediately recognizable by a longer nose. CHASSIS NUMBER XKD 501 Chassis number XKD 501 was the first D-Type production for a private team, sold to the Scottish racing team Ecurie Ecosse, and dispatched on 5 May 1955. A principal factory customer, Ecurie Ecosse was founded in 1951 and successfully ran C-Types through the early 1950s before eventually purchasing several D-Types. XKD 501 was liveried in the team’s signature colors with the St. Andrews Cross emblazoned on the front fenders. It was initially entrusted to driver Jimmy Stewart, brother of the legendary Jackie Stewart. Jimmy unfortunately crashed the D-Type twice during practice in May 1955. Each time, the car was returned to the factory for repairs. XKD 501 was therefore sidelined during June 1955, when Jaguar entered three longnose D-Types at Le Mans and played an unwitting role in one of motorsports’ most tragic disasters. Three laps into the race, team driver Mike Hawthorn, who had just lapped a much slower Austin-Healey, suddenly turned into the pits. The surprised Healey veered left to avoid hitting Hawthorn, pulling directly into the path of Pierre Levegh, who was driving one of Mercedes-Benzes new 300 SLRs. The SLR careened into the crowd, forever changing motorsports—yet the race continued. The following morning, while holding 1st and 3rd place, Mercedes-Benz withdrew from the race, and Hawthorn was left alone at the head of the pack, a full five laps ahead of the 2nd place finisher, the Aston Martin DB3S driven by Paul Frere and Peter Collins. The D-Type had won its first Le Mans, but at no small cost to the state of racing. Meanwhile, XKD 501 appeared at the Leinster Trophy on 9 July, where Desmond Titterington took the car to 9th overall, and 1st in class. Ecosse driver Ninian Sanderson assumed driving duties at the British GP on 17 July, claiming 6th place. Titterington returned to action in early August, finishing 1st and 2nd at the races at Charterhall, and then enjoyed two 1st place finishes at Snetterton a week later. Sanderson rotated in for a 1st and 2nd place at Crimond, and the two drivers teamed up for a 2nd place finish during the nine-hour race at Goodwood on 20 August. Another 2nd place by Titterington at Aintree on 3 September completed the 1955 season. VICTORY AND VINDICATION During 1956, rule changes mandated the implementation of full-width windscreens, and XKD 501 was so equipped while later receiving the engine from XKD 561 (engine number 2036-9), which the Ecurie Ecosse had acquired in the interim. The car continued to turn in solid performances during the first part of the season, with 3rd place finishes at Aintree and Charterhall, and a 1st and 2nd place at Goodwood on 21 May, while piloted by Ron Flockhart. Flockhart and Sanderson teamed for the 12 Hours of Reims on 30 June, where the D-Type model put on a clinical display. The two Ecosse drivers finished 4th, behind the three factory D-Types at 1-2-3, notably defeating the latest Ferrari TR Spider, and an F1-derived Gordini. The 24 Hours of Le Mans was held in late July, delayed from its usual June date due to modifications to the circuit intended to make the track safer for both drivers and spectators. The Jaguar factory again entered three D-Types with longnose bodywork, though in the face of the latest rule restrictions, the cars were equipped with fuel injection intended to improve mileage (a new consideration in the wake of reduced fuel allowances). Two carbureted 1955 privateer D-Types were also entered, fielded by the Garage Francorchamps and Ecurie Ecosse. The Scottish entry, this car, was again guided by the team of Sanderson and Flockhart. It was here that XKD 501 turned in its greatest performance, but as Motor Sport related two months later, “everyone had to do 34 laps on 120 liters of fuel, which worked out at approximately 11 mpg, with nothing to spare for emergencies. Naturally, the small cars were sitting pretty while the Jaguars and Aston Martins, Ferraris, and Talbots were doing plenty of worrying.” Certainly everyone was expecting a repeat of Reims, but it was not quite that simple. Although Hawthorn in the factory D-Type took an early lead, on the second lap of the race, everything changed with an early accident and two possible winners were eliminated, followed by Hawthorn, who came in after only four hours with a misfire. With 23 hours, 30 minutes still to go, the complete Jaguar team was in trouble, two cars eliminated, and one struggling with a bad fuel line. From a Works standpoint, the race appeared lost and Aston Martin and Ferrari were poised to outrun the older D-Types. The race report continued: “this left the Ecurie Ecosse Jaguar to uphold Coventry honors, and right nobly it did this, for by 5 p.m., it was in the lead and for the rest of the race, it was a game of cat and mouse between Flockhart/Sanderson and Moss/Collins. While Flockhart was driving, he was able to keep ahead of Moss and after 34 laps, when Collins took over the Aston Martin, he made up ground on Sanderson, who took over the Jaguar. Then, the next 34 laps saw the position reversed and the result was that the Scottish Jaguar had the race under its kilt, providing they played their cards wisely. With David Murray in charge of the time-keeping and Wilkie Wilkinson in charge of the pit stops, they could hardly go wrong.” Certainly, the Aston Martin didn’t quite stand a chance. The D-Type was so exceptionally fast that “Jaguar lapped regularly with nearly 1,000 rpm in hand” without significant fuel concerns, while the Aston had to be red-lined, gear by gear, entering the pits on fumes, simply to keep up. On occasion, Moss and Collins would even slip into neutral well before the end of the Mulsanne Straight and dart behind the Porsches’ slipstreams, all in an effort to save fuel. By the race’s final lap, however, with just 14 cars remaining in the field, the D-Type had a seven-lap lead on Trintignant and Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari 625 LM spider, and a narrow lead over Stirling Moss in the Aston. Swaters’ D-Type held at 4th place, and this is the order in which the cars finished, with XKD 501 claiming its definitive victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. XKD 501 completed 2,507.19 miles at an average speed of 104.47 mph, and a maximum speed of 156.868 mph on the Mulsanne Straight, good enough for 9th in the Index of Performance rankings. In doing so, XKD 501 upheld the D-Type’s dominance despite the adversity faced by the factory cars (to his credit the skilled driver Hawthorn managed to roar his way back to 6th overall). Following the amazing finish at La Sarthe, XKD 501 returned to action in Britain, with a 2nd place at Aintree and 3rd at the Goodwood Trophy Race, but these triumphs paled after its perfect performance in France. AFTER THE LIMELIGHT In 1957, Jaguar retired from factory racing altogether and sold its latest longnose D-Types, with several cars acquired by the Ecurie Ecosse. As these 3.8-liter D-Types became the team’s focus, XKD 501 was only occasionally entered in various races, beginning with the Mille Miglia on 12 May, where the car retired early with Flockhart driving. Ecurie again experienced great success at the 1957 24 Hours of Le Mans, taking 1st and 2nd place, while other D-Type privateers finished 3rd, 4th, and 6th. Even with the Jaguar factory officially retired, the D-Type was still proving to be a dominant force on the world’s biggest stage. XKD 501’s time in the spotlight faded with these developments, however, and the car elapsed 1957 with a handful of DNFs, as well as 3rd, 6th, and 7th place finishes, punctuated by a final checkered flag at the Goodwood Whitsun Meeting in June. The car was essentially retired after June 1957, and it soon passed to Ecurie Ecosse financier Major Thomson of Peebles, Scotland. In May 1967, the car was demonstrated and presented at the Griffiths Formula 1 race at Oulton Park, driven by Alistair Birrell (a photo of which appears in Andrew Whyte’s 1983 book, D-Type and XKSS: Super Profile). In October 1970, XKD 501 was sold to Sir Michael Nairn, a fellow Scot, and over the following few years was sympathetically restored with emphasis on retaining its purity and originality to its 1956 Le Mans specifications by Raymond Fielding, as detailed in the September/October 1996 issue of Jaguar World magazine. The engine head and block were returned to Jaguar to be rebuilt, while the suspension and brakes were restored with proper components. Parts were sourced from John Pearson, one of the world’s foremost authorities on the D-Type, and a boyhood associate of the factory C-Type teams of the early 1950s. Most of the work was actually performed by ex-HRG/Cooper/Vanwall employee Dick Watson. Sir Nairn then used the car rather frequently, including presentation at the 1996 Goodwood Festival of Speed and the Silverstone Classic. In 1999, XKD 501 was purchased by the consignor, one of America’s most respected collectors of exceptional sports and racing cars. The new owner retained John Pearson to evaluate and freshen the car as needed for vintage racing applications, where it was presented at the 2002 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, winning the Jaguar Competition class and the Road & Track Award. A LEGEND AMONG LEGENDS In May 2002, Jaguar World Monthly magazine ran a feature on the car by marque expert Paul Skilleter, where he described his spirited ride: “With a 0–100 mph time of probably around the 12-second mark, the acceleration combined with the blast of the exhaust and the rush of air over the cockpit made it an exhilarating experience . . . The other aspect of a D-Type [that I noticed] is its solidity of build: sitting comfortably deep within those enfolding curves, you feel nothing vibrate, nothing rattle, nothing flex. Just sit in a D-Type and you know why it won Le Mans.” Now offered from only its third private owner, XKD 501 checks all the proverbial boxes. It has won the most grueling contest in sports car racing, the famed 24 Hours of Le Mans, and is a centrifugal component of Jaguar’s three consecutive wins at La Sarthe. The Jaguar has been fastidiously maintained and serviced by just four caretakers, including a restoration by some of the world’s most knowledgeable experts. Almost unique among a run of automobiles that inevitably led hard lives, its history is refreshingly clean, concise, and incredibly well-known. Chronicled in many books as a permanent part of Le Mans lore, this extremely important Ecurie Ecosse D-Type would crown the finest collections, notable for its history, rarity, and beautifully authentic presentation. Not merely a significant and markedly well-preserved D-Type, nor a star in the forefront of important racing Jaguars, XKD 501 can inarguably be held among the most historic British sports cars ever made. It is a legend among legends. Chassis no. XKD 501 Engine no. E 2036-9

  • USAMonterey, USA
  • 2016-08-19

1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider by Touring

180 bhp, 2905 cc DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with dual overhead cams and dual Roots-type superchargers, four-speed manual transmission, double-wishbone independent front suspension with coil springs over dampers, swing axle rear suspension with radius arms, transverse semi-elliptical leaf spring, and hydraulic friction dampers, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 118.1 in. Offered from the Sam & Emily Mann Collection The Italian equivalent of the Bugatti Atlantic; the ultimate Italian sports car of its generation One of approximately 12 extant Touring Spiders Documented by marque authority Simon Moore in The Immortal 2.9: Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award-winning restoration by U.K. 2.9 expert Tony Merrick The first “Immortal 2.9” to be offered at public auction this century extraordinary adj. 1) very unusual; very different from what is normal or ordinary 2) extremely good or impressive What, in the mid-1930s, passed for a sports car? The wealthy buyer’s options were few and far between. MGs were exciting, true, but small, inexpensive, and rough around the edges. Mercedes-Benz 540 Ks and Duesenbergs were fast but massive, and not particularly storehouses of new technology. Bugatti, certainly, qualified, with its nimble if unorthodox chassis engineering and potent, when supercharged, overhead-cam engines. Above all of these was the Alfa Romeo 8C 2900, whose lineage is part of a consistent and logical evolution stretching back to the 1920s, to the competition-oriented P3s, and the overwhelming race victories achieved in the early to mid-1930s by the 8C 2300s. The 8C 2900 was not a mere sports car, but the most advanced, modern, and compelling sports car that money could buy. To the gentleman who was accustomed to watching the workings of his Swiss watch or mastering the intricacies of his yacht’s sails, it was a symphony. Each wheel carried independent suspension; its Vittorio Jano-designed straight-eight engine was two alloy banks of four cylinders, with not only dual overhead camshafts, but two Roots-type superchargers, as well. As exciting and dramatic as the 2.9 chassis itself was, they benefitted from the addition of some of the most sensuous and well-balanced coachwork of the pre-war era. Foremost among the handful of mostly Italian coachbuilders whose works graced the 2.9 chassis was Milan’s own Carrozzeria Touring, whose patent for Superleggera construction happily coincided with the birth of Alfa Romeo’s masterpiece. The Superleggera method, based upon lessons learned from Frenchman Charles Weymann’s fabric-paneled coachwork, utilized an inner framework of pencil-thin, hollow steel tubes, wrapped in outer panels of aluminum, with fabric used in-between as a buffer against electrolysis. Unlike previous lightweight construction methods, Touring’s new idea allowed for a virtually featherweight structure that could be curved to suit the wind. Tales are rife of Touring engineers running prototype bodies on the road, with strips of felt attached; photographers would capture images of the cars at speed, and the body lines would be adjusted to suit the curves of the “stream lines.” Some of Touring’s best early Superleggera bodies were built on the 2.9 chassis, both the long-wheelbase Lungo and short-wheelbase Corto variants. Regardless of the length, the bodies were nearly perfect in their curvaceous proportions and most notably, their steeply raked windscreen and grille, with rear wheels often shaded by fitted spats, long flowing pontoon front fenders, and a rear end that appeared tucked between the fenders, visually exaggerating the great powerful length of the nose. Touring’s usual attention to detail resulted in small sparkles of polished chrome here and there, like sterling silver displayed on black velvet. One of the fortunate circumstances of the 8C 2900 is that every known chassis has been scrupulously studied and researched by a knowledgeable historian, Simon Moore. Mr. Moore has known almost all of the surviving examples and their owners through the decades and has compiled his research in The Immortal 2.9: Alfa Romeo 8C 2900, first published in 1986 and revised with his latest findings in 2008; needless to say these books, along with his work on the 8C 2300s, are considered vital to any dedicated connoisseur’s library. His attention to accuracy and detail has pieced together the stories of many surviving cars, not least among them that which is offered here. LAS CARRERAS DE UN 2.9 Moore’s latest research indicates that the known history of this car starts in 1949. According to the Brazilian newspaper Folha da Manha (now Folha de Sao Paulo) for 15 February 1949, an amateur driver in Sao Paulo called Mario Tavares Leite imported an 8C 2900B to Brazil from Italy. The poor photo in that paper shows the front of a Touring Spider. He raced his new acquisition at Interlagos, in the sports car class, and won a race there, on 31 July 1949. He won again at the II Premio Cronica Esportiva Paulista meeting at Interlagos on 30 April 1950, after which the car disappeared. In an article on Brazilian racer Camillo Christofaro in a now-defunct Brazilian magazine, Motor, for 3 September 1986, he states: “Em 1958 Camillo pegou um Alfa Romeo de passeio, encurtou o chassi e fez um carro grand prix, equipou com motor Corvette (...)” or, roughly translated, that Camillo took an Alfa Romeo touring car, shortened its chassis, put a Corvette engine in it, and made a racing car. It seems probable, therefore, that this was the single-seater Mecanica Nacional car raced by Christofaro after he had bought both a Tipo 308 and the 8C 2900B from his uncle, Chico Landi. The chassis was part of a hoard of parts that came from Brazil in late 1972, which was acquired by David Llewelyn. Meanwhile, in Argentina, another long chassis 8C 2900B, also with Touring Spider coachwork, was acquired by Carlos Menditeguy of Argentina. In 1953, the car was sold to a Buenos Aires racer, German Pesce, and his partner Iantorno. The two men modified the car by removing the body and installing cycle-fendered racing coachwork, and the complete original body was set aside save for the radiator grille and surround, which were incorporated into the new racing body. The complete original Touring coachwork was sold to Juan Giacchio, owner of a body shop in the Buenos Aires suburb of Palermo. Giacchio retained the body until his passing in 1986, and at that time it was offered by his widow to Ed Jurist of the Vintage Car Store. Hector Mendizabal, the well-known Argentinean broker of the period, confirmed that it was from an 8C 2900B Lungo chassis, Touring body number 2027, the color a light silver blue with red leather—and it was missing the grille. Correspondence from both individuals during that period indicated an association with chassis 412041. MEANWHILE, IN EUROPE During this same period, as often happens, pieces of a puzzle began to fall together elsewhere. In 1983, David Black acquired the modified 8C 2900 rolling chassis, which was still complete with authentic 8C 2900 suspension and transaxle, from David Llewellyn; the frame had its engine bearers (and thus the chassis number) cut away to accommodate the Corvette V-8, although a correct frame number, 432042, in the proper Alfa Romeo typeface, was still present. Moore recalls in The Immortal 2.9 his recollection of seeing the frame a decade earlier in 1973: “I was completely convinced that this was a genuine Alfa Romeo frame.” Following Black’s death, the car passed to Jan Bruijn in 1993. Guido Haschke of Switzerland subsequently acquired the rolling chassis and, at the same time, acquired the original, remarkably well-preserved Touring Spider body from Italian collector Count Vittorio Zanon di Valgiurata. The body, in the same light silver blue and missing its radiator grille and surround, was without doubt the Menditeguy Touring Spider, body number 2027, which is pictured in Moore’s book, while still in Buenos Aires. The following year, 1994, Sam Mann was alerted to the availability of the project and contacted Alfa Romeo restorer Tony Merrick, a gentleman who carries the same prestige in 2.9 restorations as Simon Moore does in documenting their past, to inspect the car and advise as to its authenticity. Merrick, who has had 10 to 12 of these fabled cars through his workshop, found the components to be authentic, and with his advice, Sam opted to purchase the car and engage Merrick to perform the restoration. Through the sleuthing of Moore and Merrick, a complete original 8C 2900B engine, number 422042, was acquired, thus securing the last of the necessary components for a proper and authentic restoration. It is a reality understood by those in racing circles that these high-performance Alfa Romeos and many other similar cars were simply tools used on a track, and such is the nature of competition racing that as technology and rules evolved, so did the cars, which often led multiple lives. That these truly rare components from a model with such a miniscule production run survived to be united by a dedicated enthusiast is nothing short of remarkable. It is worthy of note that during the subsequent restoration, the original body number, 2027, was located on numerous panels. Interestingly, 2026 appears on the glove box door, indicating that the two sequential bodies were being built at the same time, and someone put the wrong glove box door in this car! During the restoration, when Merrick placed the body on the re-lengthened chassis, he found that the holes on the top of the frame lined up exactly with the holes in the inner fender liner panels. According to Merrick, who has fully disassembled at least six of these cars, the holes were not made to a drawing or template but were drilled freehand by the Touring workmen during assembly so that a series of screws would hold it all together. This construction method would have created a unique “fingerprint,” thus indicating that the body could have somehow been original to this chassis. Merrick recently confirmed he still holds this belief, given his understanding of the construction of these cars on a more forensic level. To summarize, since no hard evidence exists to confirm the true sequence of events, it remains possible that the Menditeguy Alfa traveled to Brazil from Argentina in the mid- to late-1950s, sans Touring body, where it was then further modified and raced with the Chevrolet V-8, only to be reunited with its original Touring coachwork some four decades later. Mr. Merrick had completed the restoration of the chassis, drivetrain, and body by late 1997, with the exception of paintwork, which was performed – in its current lustrous black – upon arrival back in the United States. At that time, Sam opted to add the chromed stone guards on the rear fenders, and the flashing on the rear of the front fenders, authentic design elements which he had admired on another 2.9 Touring Spider. The car was subsequently debuted at the 1999 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded 2nd in Class and the Gwenn Graham Trophy for Most Elegant Convertible. More recently, this year it was deemed the Most Elegant Car at the Cavallino Classic Sports Sunday at the Mar-a-Lago Club. Since joining the Mann’s stateside stable, noted twin cam specialist Phil Reilly has handled all maintenance, repair, and tuning work. Most recently, Sam has been able to acquire the rare and valuable fuel pumps specific to the 8C 2900, which will be included with the sale for installation by the next owner. Perhaps the most persuasive testament to the quality of the restoration and its subsequent expert care, and the effortless drivability of the 8C 2900, is the fact that the Manns have spent over 12,000 miles behind the wheel, including seven 8C Alfa Tours between 1999 and 2013, in addition to the Copperstate 1000, the Colorado Grand, the California Mille, and the California Classic Rally. IMMORTAL AND EXTRAORDINARY Only approximately 32 2.9 chassis were made; the survivors are the most sought-after European sports cars of their generation, none more so than those bodied by Touring. Of the extant examples of the 8C 2900, it is believed that only 12 are Touring Spiders, seven of which are on the long chassis. They can be justifiably referred to as “Italy’s version of the Bugatti Atlantic,” as, like the Bugatti Type 57SC of fame, they combined the best engineering and styling of their generation in one advanced, sensuous, undeniably thrilling package. Ownership of this car for the last two decades has certainly been thrilling for Sam and Emily Mann, who describe the car as “a pleasure to drive way beyond its years.” He fondly recalls “loping along” behind fellow 2.9-owner John Mozart on one of the fabled 8C tours: “My left foot was resting on the handbrake and my right arm was resting on the door sill, and we were just comfortably flying right along. My speedometer cable had broken and I didn’t know how fast we were going along a 10-mile stretch until John told me when we stopped later on: 105 miles an hour.” Sam is still astonished at the way this car combines so many important facets in equal measure: high performance, a convertible top (and a disappearing one, at that), a huge compartment for luggage along with a compartment for tools, a spare tire, and supplies. “Most supercars today don’t have a place for glasses or a jacket, and here in 1939, you have a car that has substantial performance along with convenience and elegance for a weekend drive – or to cross Europe.” Then as now, buying one places its owner in the foremost echelon of automotive enthusiasts. With the majority of these cars in significant long-term collections, acquiring one has, until this point, required not only significant financial resources, but more importantly, being in the right place at the right time. The 2.9 is, yes, “immortal,” as it was described by Automobile Quarterly, made famous by Simon Moore, and preserved through the care, experience, and attention to detail of restorers like Tony Merrick. It remains simply extraordinary – in every sense of the word. Chassis no. 412041 Engine no. 422042 Body no. 2027

  • USAMonterey, USA
  • 2016-08-19
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Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider - 1961 Carte grise française

Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider - 1961 Carte grise française Châssis n° 2935GT Moteur n° 2935 Numéro interne n° 610 E Boîte de vitesses n° 8.61 Pont n° 383F - Certainement le plus beau cabriolet de la deuxième moitié du XXème siècle - Une des 37 California Spider SWB phares carénés construite - Entièrement originale, jamais restaurée - Histoire unique et fabuleuse - Ayant appartenu à l'une des plus grandes stars du cinéma, Alain Delon - Matching numbers - La California du Salon de Paris 1961 - Même propriétaire depuis 1971 Avec la 250, le destin de Ferrari va changer. De constructeur marginal, il va prendre une dimension industrielle et acquérir l'aura mondiale qu'on lui connaît aujourd'hui. Autour du fameux V12 3 litres, dont les qualités de puissance et de souplesse ne sont plus à démontrer, naissent deux familles d'automobiles : des Ferrari exclusivement destinées à la piste, et d'autres plutôt réservées à un usage routier et offrant donc un confort et un équipement dont étaient jusque-là dépourvues les voitures de la marque. La branche course donnera naissance à des légendes sur roues comme les Testa Rossa, berlinettes Tour de France, 250 GTO ou 250 LM alors que la famille des voitures de route produira de merveilleux coupés ou cabriolets que se disputeront stars, sportifs de haut niveau et gros industriels. Mais ce qui caractérise aussi le constructeur de Maranello, ce sont les "passerelles" constantes qui relient les deux familles, et qui fait que les voitures de route ne sont jamais très loin de la piste... Le spider 250 GT California est le fruit de ce mariage idéal. En effet, alors que le cabriolet 250 GT Pinin Farina est directement dérivé du coupé grand tourisme, le spider California s'appuie sur les berlinettes destinées à la compétition. A tel point d'ailleurs que, sur un dessin magistral de Pinin Farina, il est carrossé chez Scaglietti, à qui Ferrari confie la réalisation de ses voitures de compétition. Le spider reprend le même châssis de 2,60 m d'empattement que la berlinette Tour de France, son moteur offre des caractéristiques comparables et sa forme adopte le décrochement d'aile arrière caractéristique de la version fermée. Comme il est moins systématiquement orienté compétition, il accuse sur la balance quelques dizaines de kilos de plus que son homologue, mais reste malgré tout plus léger que le cabriolet. D'ailleurs, certains modèles plus spécialement préparés pour les joies du chronomètre vont se distinguer sur circuits : ainsi, Ginther et Hively terminent premiers de la catégorie Grand Tourisme et neuvièmes au classement général des 12 Heures de Sebring 1959 et Grossman et Tavano décrochent la cinquième place aux 24 Heures du Mans de la même année, au volant d'un spider engagé par l'écurie du NART de l'enthousiaste Luigi Chinetti. Ledit Chinetti n'est d'ailleurs certainement pas étranger à l'appellation "California" du spider 250 GT : d'origine milanaise, ami intime d'Enzo Ferrari, il participe largement et efficacement à la diffusion de Ferrari en Amérique du Nord, qui devient pour le constructeur italien un marché avec lequel le modèle va connaître une évolution parallèle à celle des versions compétition et un grand succès commercial auprès des plus exigeants amateurs fortunés. En tout, quarante sept exemplaires sont vendus en moins de deux ans dont curieusement 6 seulement en Californie. En réalité deux California de plus sont sorties des ateliers de Scaglietti à la même époque, un coupé " Boano " et un cabriolet Pinin Farina, rhabillés à la suite d'accidents. Et il convient bien sûr de ne pas oublier les 52 exemplaires sur châssis court qui ont pris la suite entre 1960 et 1962. Modèle exclusif et performant, le spider California garde une place à part dans la production Ferrari, car il réalise une synthèse inégalé entre les qualités des modèles de piste et ceux de route, les deux voies sur lesquelles Ferrari a appuyé son succès planétaire. De plus les carrosseries cabriolet de la marque sont particulièrement rares dans la production Ferrari, ce qui explique son succès grandissant au fil des décennies faisant aujourd'hui de la California la plus chère des Ferrari routières. Sur les 52 exemplaires produits sur châssis court, seuls 37 California sont sorties avec les phares carénées. Cette particularité est la plus recherchée aujourd'hui et ce, grâce à l'élégance supérieure qu'elle revêt. Lorsqu'il se rend au Salon de l'Auto, à Paris en 1961, Gérard Blain est déjà un acteur de cinéma confirmé. Á 31 ans, il a déjà une vingtaine de films à son actif et une passion pour les cabriolets Ferrari. Il vient de faire reprendre sa Ferrari 250 GT Série 1 (la voiture du Salon de Paris 1957) par la Franco-Britannic Autos, l'importateur Ferrari, et s'intéresse de très près au magnifique Spider 250 GT California châssis court, de couleur bleu foncé, hard-top bleu foncé, intérieur simili noir, exposé sur le stand de ce même importateur Ferrari. Ce châssis 2935GT, terminé le 27 septembre 1961, a été envoyé immédiatement chez l'importateur parisien pour le Salon qui a lieu du 5 au 15 octobre 1961. La première semaine du Salon sont exposées sur le stand de la Franco-Britannic une 250 GT Berlinette Lusso (#2917), une 250 GTE et une 250 cabriolet série II. La Ferrari 250 berlinette châssis court sera vendue dès le début du Salon et sera remplacée en deuxième semaine par cette Ferrari 250 California #2935. Après son achat par Gérard Blain, elle est immatriculée le 21 octobre 1961 à son nom et son adresse (9 rue de Siam, Paris XVIe arrondissement), sous le numéro 88 LR 75, 6 jours donc après la fermeture du Salon. Alain Delon est de la même génération que Gérard Blain, et les voitures de sport font évidemment partie de son environnement de star. Séduit par la belle Ferrari de son ami, il lui achète et on la retrouve immatriculée 4452 MC, à Monaco donc. Une copie du titre de circulation monégasque au nom de l'acteur nous montre qu'il l'a immatriculée précisément le 23 mai 1963 en Principauté. Il est incroyable de découvrir que Marc Bouvot, fils du troisième propriétaire, a retrouvé les plaques originales 4452 MC que son père avait conservé après l'achat auprès d'Alain Delon. A cette époque, après avoir été consacré par Plein Soleil et Rocco et ses frères, Alain Delon connaît une fantastique accélération de sa carrière d'acteur. Beau, séduisant, talentueux, il fait tourner les têtes et tomber les cœurs, et les producteurs profitent de cette fabuleuse image pour le faire tourner sans discontinuer. En 1963, il est avec Jane Fonda dans Les Félins, où René Clément l'entraîne dans une machiavélique machination. L'année suivante, on le retrouve avec Shirley MacLaine dans La Rolls Royce jaune où il séduit une riche et belle marquise. La Ferrari partage ces grands moments avec le célébrissime acteur et des photos le montrent au volant du Spider 2935GT, en compagnie des deux actrices, elles aussi des stars que le monde admire. En 1964, Alain Delon et sa femme Nathalie partent en voyage en Californie. L'acteur fait envoyer la voiture à destination afin d'en profiter dans les rues de Los Angeles. C'est certainement à ce moment-là que les répétiteurs de clignotants sur les ailes avant ont été changés afin de correspondre aux normes américaines. Nous avons retrouvé sous le siège passager les répétiteurs ronds d'origine dans leur boîte ! Sur l'attestation d'assurance de l'époque, un document original fourni par le fils du troisième propriétaire, on remarque une adresse inscrite à la main indiquant une adresse à Beverly Hills. Sans doute l'acteur avait-il noté cette indication afin de la communiquer à son assureur. Sur une photo prise aux États-Unis en 1964, la Ferrari California est surprise devant une station d'essence, avec Nathalie Delon, pendant que son mari vérifie la pression des pneus et, sur un autre cliché, on aperçoit le couple à Los Angeles, en promenade à bord de sa voiture. En juillet 1965, Alain Delon se sépare de la Ferrari California et en confie la vente à Michel Maria Urman Automobiles, 40 bis rue Guersant, Paris XVIIe, spécialiste de voitures de prestige. Elle est achetée le 2 août 1965 pour la somme de 30 000 francs par Paul Bouvot, alors que la voiture n'affiche que 37 000 km. Paul Bouvot dirige à cette époque le Centre de Style des Automobiles Peugeot, et son œil de styliste perçoit le caractère exceptionnel de la ligne de la California. Il confiera un jour à son fils : "Cette Ferrari est un chef d'œuvre ; elle est belle quel que soit l'angle sous lequel on la regarde, avec ou sans ses attributs". Il évoque bien sûr les pare-chocs, qui sont parfois démontés de la voiture comme le montrent des photos que nous a montrées son fils Marc Bouvot. Paul Bouvot immatricule la Ferrari le 18 août 1965, sous le numéro 6101 RU 75. Pendant un an, il va parcourir quelque 25 000 km, ne se gênant guère pour se rendre au volant au Centre de Style Peugeot, ce qui fera grincer des dents certains dirigeants qui auraient préféré le voir arriver dans une plus classique Peugeot. Mais Paul Bouvot est un Ferrariste passionné. Ainsi, quand il vend le Spider California en mai 1966 à son quatrième propriétaire, M. Robert Cooper (un Canadien vivant à Paris), c'est pour acheter quelques mois plus tard une autre Ferrari 250GT California châssis court que son ami Jess Pourret lui propose. Mais c'est une autre histoire... Robert Cooper gardera la voiture six mois, avant de la céder fin 1966 à un amateur de voitures de sport parisien qui en profitera jusqu'en octobre 1967. L'avant-dernier propriétaire de 2935GT est un médecin parisien qui la gardera quatre ans jusqu'à son acquisition en novembre 1971 par Jacques Baillon. 2935GT rentre alors dans une collection prestigieuse commencée dans les années 1950 par Roger Baillon, son père. Jacques Baillon roulera très peu avec la Ferrari qui, comme la plupart de ses voitures, se retrouvera vite remisée à l'abri du temps et des intempéries. Marc Bouvot, dont le père a acheté la Ferrari à Alain Delon en 1965, nous a permis de consulter ses documents originaux exceptionnels (plaques minéralogiques originales Monaco, certificats originaux d'assurance au nom d'Alain Delon, copie du titre monégasque, pochette originale en cuir). C'est également grâce à l'ouvrage de référence sur le Salon de Paris intitulé "Les Ferrari au Salon de Paris-1948 /1988" de Dominique Pascal, et avec la collaboration de Jess Pourret et Marc Rabineau, que nous avons pu constituer un dossier historique très complet. L'avis des spécialistes " Ce graal automobile se trouve aujourd'hui telle que nous l'avons découvert, le 30 septembre dernier, alors que nous ouvrions la porte du garage de la propriété. Protégée de toute humidité, elle nous fait front, recouverte d'un léger voile de poussière et de quelques piles de magazines et autres journaux. Elle a mieux résisté au poids des années qu'au poids du papier…son coffre s'en est incliné. Mais il ne s'agissait surtout pas d'y toucher tant cette particularité donne à la Belle toute son originalité, son exclusivité et son histoire unique. Chaque grain de poussière reste celui de tant d'années de stockage à l'abri des intempéries. Protégée de l'humidité, sa robe est saine, tout autant que son châssis. Les jours de portes, capot et coffre sont droits et d'origine. Lorsque vous fermez les portes, on perçoit ce bruit caractéristique d'une automobile préservée. Ses vitres latérales sont en plexiglas (serait-ce d'origine ?). Son intérieur est celui d'origine, avec sa sellerie noire en simili cuir. L'acquéreur qui se glissera derrière son volant prendra possession de la clef pour ouvrir la boîte à gants. Il y découvrira la paire de gants en cuir havane asséchée par le temps, déposé sur des vignettes automobiles des années 71 à 75, jamais collées sur le pare-brise. Lorsqu'il baissera le dossier passager, il glissera sa main dans le vide-poche pour y découvrir le manuel d'origine ainsi que les bons d'essence d'époque. Dans le vide-poches du dossier du fauteuil conducteur, il découvrira le double de clefs. En ouvrant le coffre, il découvrira deux circuits pour enfants, certainement cachés là par Jacques Baillon en vue de les offrir à ses enfants à Noël…ses enfants ne les reçurent jamais…oubliés au fond du coffre… A côté, un nécessaire de pharmacie d'époque encore dans son emballage plastique ainsi que plusieurs exemplaires du livre de Paul Frère "La conduire en compétition". La baie moteur elle semble ne jamais avoir bougée…jamais démontée, intacte avec ses deux bobines originales… rarissimes. Cette automobile est une œuvre d'art, la dernière California châssis court phares carénés dans un état d'origine intouchée depuis 45 années, probablement jamais démontée. Elle est le graal des Spiders Grand Tourisme, la référence ultime de l'histoire de l'Automobile et LE plus beau cabriolet de la seconde moitié du XXe siècle. " Une procédure d'enregistrement des enchérisseurs particulière s'applique à ce lot. Si vous souhaitez enchérir sur ce lot, merci de vous manifester auprès du département et de vous enregistrer au moins 48 heures avant la vente. French title Chassis n° 2935GT Engine n° 2935 Internal number: 610 E Gear box n° 8.61 Rear axle n° 383F - Certainly the most beautiful cabriolet of the second half of the 20th century - One of 37 California Spider SWBs with covered headlights - Completely original, never restored - Unique, fabulous history - Belonged to one of the most famous film stars, Alain Delon - Matching numbers - The 1961 Paris Motor Show California, - Same owner since 1971 Ferrari's destiny was changed by the 250. Starting as a small-scale constructor, it took on an industrial dimension and gained the international reputation that it enjoys today. Centred on the famous V12 3-litre engine, which had nothing further to prove, two Ferrari families were born : one destined exclusively for the track and the other, offering a level of comfort and equipment missing until that point, for the road. The racing line gave birth to such legendary cars as the Testa Rossa, Tour de France berlinetta, 250 GTO and the 250 LM. Meanwhile stars, tycoons and amateur enthusiasts fought over the road-going line which produced splendid coupés and cabriolets. A constant characteristic of Maranello was the strong link between these two groups, which meant that the road-going cars were never far from the race track...The 250 GT California Spider is the child of this perfect marriage. Indeed, while the 250 GT cabriolet by Pinin Farina is derived from the GT coupé, the California Spider is drawn from the competition berlinettas. So much so that the brilliant design by Pinin Farina was bodied by Scaglietti who built the competition cars for Ferrari. The Spider used the same chassis with 2.6m wheelbase as the Tour de France, had a comparable engine and featured the same rear wing styling as the closed version. Being geared less towards racing, it was a little heavier than its counterpart, but still lighter than the cabriolet. Also, there were certain models, specially prepared with a stopwatch in mind, that distinguished themselves on the circuit : Ginther and Hively finished first in the GT category and ninth overall in the 1959 Sebring 12 Hour race, and Grossman and Tavano took fifth place in the Le Mans 24 Hour race the same year, at the wheel of a spider from the NART team belonging to enthusiast Luigi Chinetti. The aforementioned Chinetti was involved in the " California " title of the 250 GT Spider: originally from Milan and a close friend of Enzo Ferrari, he was largely responsible for the widespread and efficient distribution of Ferrari throughout North America. This became an important market for the model that evolved alongside the competition versions, and enjoyed great commercial success with demanding wealthy amateur drivers. In all, forty-seven examples were sold in under two years, with surprisingly just six going to California. Two further Californias left the Scaglietti workshop at that time, a " Boano " coupé and a Pinin Farina cabriolet, both rebodied after accidents. And one must not forget the 52 short-chassis examples which followed on between 1960 and 1962. An exclusive and high-performance model, the California Spider holds a special place in the history of Ferrari, as it embodies an unrivalled fusion of qualities for road and track, the two paths on which Ferrari built its global success. The open versions of this marque are particularly rare, which explains the growing success across the decades of the California, the most expensive road-going Ferrari today. Of the 52 short wheelbase examples of the California produced, just 37 had covered headlights. This feature is the most highly sought after today, for its superior elegance. When he arrived at the Paris Motor Show in 1961, Gérard Blain was already an established film actor. He was 31, with some twenty films to his name and a passion for Ferrari convertibles. He had just returned his Ferrari 250 GT Series 1 (the 1957 Paris Motor Show car) to the Ferrari importer Franco-Britannic Autos, and was interested in the magnificent 250 GT California SWB Spider, in dark blue with dark blue hard-top and black imitation leather interior, displayed on the same Ferrari importer's stand. This particular chassis 2935GT, completed on 27 September 1961, had been sent straight to the Parisian importer to be shown at the Motor Show on 5 to 15 October 1961. During the first week of the show, a 250 GT Berlinetta Lusso (#2917), a 250 GTE and a 250 cabriolet series II were on show on the Franco-Britannic stand. The Ferrari 250 SWB berlinetta was sold at the start of the show and was replaced in the second week by this Ferrari 250 California #2935. The Ferrari was bought by Gérard Blain and registered on 21 October 1961 in his name and address (9 rue de Siam, Paris XVIe arrondissement), with the number 88 LR 75, just six days after the Motor Show had closed. Alain Delon was from the same generation as Gérard Blain, and sports cars were clearly part of his celebrity scene. Liking the look of his friend's stunning Ferrari, he bought it, and had it registered in Monaco, 4452 MC. A copy of the Monégasque registration papers in the actor's name reveals that he registered it on 23 May 1963 in the Principality. Amazingly, Marc Bouvot, the son of the third owner, found the original plates 4452 MC that his father kept after buying the car from Alain Delon. At this period, having become established through roles in Plein Soleil et Rocco et ses frères, Alain Delon's acting career suddenly took off. Handsome, charming and talented, he caused heads to turn and hearts to break. Producers profited from this fabulous image by keeping him busy in one film after another. In 1963, he starred with Jane Fonda in Les Félins (Joy House), in which René Clément weaved him into a Machiavellian plot. The following year, he appeared with Shirley MacLaine in La Rolls Royce jaune (The Yellow Rolls-Royce), in which he seduced a rich and beautiful marquise. The Ferrari shared these great moments with the celebrity actor and photos show him at the wheel of the Spider 2935GT, in the company of these two actresses, themselves stars admired worldwide. In 1964, Alain Delon and his wife Nathalie travelled to California. The actor had the car sent out so that he could enjoy driving it around the streets of Los Angeles. It must have been at this time that the indicator lights on the side of the front wings were changed to correspond with American regulations. Under the passenger seat we found the original round indicator lights in their box ! On the period insurance certificate, an original document supplied by the son of the third owner, an address in Beverley Hills is recorded by hand. No doubt the actor noted this information down for his insurance company. In a photo taken in the United States in 1964, the Ferrari California is spotted at a gas station, with Nathalie Delon, while her husband checks the tyre pressures. In another photo, the couple are seen in Los Angeles, riding in their car. In July 1965, Alain Delon parted with the Ferrari California, entrusting its sale to Michel Maria Urman Automobiles, 40 bis rue Guersant, Paris XVIIe, a specialist in prestigious cars. It was bought on 2 August 1965 for the sum of 30,000 francs by Paul Bouvot, having covered just 37,000 km. At that time, Paul Bouvot ran the Style Centre of Peugeot, and as a designer, appreciated the California's exceptional styling. One day he confided to his son : " This Ferrari is a masterpiece, it is beautiful which ever way you look at it, with or without its attributes. " He was no doubt referring to the bumpers, which were sometimes taken off the car, as photos shown to us by his son Marc Bouvot reveal. Paul Bouvot registered the car on 18 August 1965, with the number 6101 RU 75. Over the course of a year, he covered some 25,000 km, not bothered about turning up at the Peugeot Style Centre at the wheel of this car, something that must have riled certain directors who would have preferred to see him arrive in a more classic Peugeot. Paul Bouvot was a passionate Ferrarista however. When he sold the California Spider in May 1966 to its fourth owner, Mr Robert Cooper (a Canadian living in Paris), it was to buy another Ferrari 250GT SWB California a few months later offered by his friend Jess Pourret. But that is another story... Robert Cooper kept the car for six months, before selling it at the end of 1966 to a Parisian sports car enthusiast who ran it until October 1967. The last but one owner of 2935GT was a doctor from Paris who kept the car for four years until it was acquired by Jacques Baillon in November 1971. And so 2935GT entered a prestigious collection that had been started during the 1950s by Roger Baillon, his father. Jacques Baillon drove the Ferrari very little, and like the majority of his cars, it soon found itself stored away, protected from the elements and bad weather. Marc Bouvot, whose father bought the car from Alain Delon in 1965, allowed us to consult his outstanding original documents (original Monaco number plate, original insurance documents in Alain Delon's name, copy of the Monégasque registration document, original leather folder). Also thanks to the reference book on the Paris Motor Show entitled "Les Ferrari au Salon de Paris-1948 /1988" by Dominique Pascal, with the collaboration of Jess Pourret and Marc Rabineau, we were able to put together a complete history file. The specialist's view " This highly sought-after automobile is presented today exactly as we found it, on 30 September, when we opened the garage door to the property. There it sat in front of us, in the dry, covered with a light veil of dust and several piles of magazines and papers. It has held up against the passing of the years better than the weight of paper...its boot is dented. However, it was imperative not to touch anything, as this was part of the story of this Sleeping Beauty, its originality, exclusivity and unique history. Every speck of dust is a record of the years it has been stored and kept safe from the elements. Protected from moisture, the body and the chassis are both sound. The lines of the original doors, boot and bonnet are straight. When you close the doors, you hear that characteristic sound of a motor car that has been preserved. The side windows are in plexiglas (would they have been original ?). The interior is original, with black imitation leather upholstery. The future buyer who slips in behind the wheel will take possession of the key to the glove box and will find a pair of tan leather gloves, dried over time, laid on top of tax discs from 1971 to 1975 that were never stuck on the windscreen. In the pocket on the back of the passenger seat he will find the original owner's manual and some old fuel receipts. In the back of the driver's seat he will discover the spare set of keys. On opening the boot, he will find two children's tracks that must have been hidden there by Jacques Baillon, a Christmas present for his children...his children never received these and they were left, forgotten, deep at the back of the boot...Next to them, a packet from the chemist, still in its plastic wrapper, along with several copies of the book by Paul Frère " La conduite en compétition ". The engine bay looks as if it has never been moved...never dismantled, and is intact still with the two original coils...incredibly rare. This automobile is a work of art, the last short chassis California with covered headlights, in original condition and untouched for the last 45 years, and probably never dismantled. This is the Holy Grail of GT Spiders, the ultimate reference in the history of the automobile and THE most beautiful cabriolet from the second half of the 20th century." Special bidder registration procedures apply to this lot. If you intend to bid on this lot you need to register your interest with Artcurial no less than 48 hours in advance of the sale.

  • FRAParis, Frankreich
  • 2015-02-06

1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti

320 hp, 3,286 cc aluminum-block V-12 engine with six Weber 38 DCN carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent suspension with front and rear unequal-length wishbones, coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. The 23rd of only 32 examples produced; considered one of the very best in existence Shown at the Earls Court in 1966 Successfully and frequently campaigned by Ron Fry, David Skailes, and Jack Maurice throughout England, with countless 1st place finishes Formerly of the renowned Matsuda Collection in Japan Ferrari Classiche certified; retains all of its original mechanical components An exceptional 250 LM in every regard; one of the most important and sought after of all Ferraris RACING IN THE UNITED KINGDOM Like all other 250 LMs, chassis number 6105, the 23rd of just 32 examples constructed, was destined for the race track. The Ferrari was ordered through Maranello Concessionaires by noted privateer Ronald Fry, a descendant of the prominent Fry family, who had made their fortune through confectionaries and chocolates in England starting in the 18th century. Ronald Fry was a seasoned racer, and it was no secret that his favorite cars were those from Maranello. Fry had traded in his 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO (chassis number 3869GT), which he had campaigned quite successfully over the 1963 and 1964 seasons, and with the arrival of the 250 LM in mid-September, he was obviously quite excited to get his newest Ferrari out onto the track. The 250 LM, boasting a new mid-mounted, 3.3-liter V-12, was developed for the GT class but forced to compete as a sports prototype. This was a drastically different automobile from earlier 250-series Ferraris. Nevertheless, it proved to be highly successful on the track, exhibiting spectacular poise due to its combination of handling and horsepower, which was beautifully mastered by a number of skilled drivers lucky enough to get behind the wheel. In 1965, chassis 5893 took 1st overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, making it the last Ferrari to ever do so, cementing the car’s place in automotive history. The 250 LM is widely lauded as one of the greatest Ferraris of all time by owners, historians, and tifosi alike, and it would appear that Fry would agree. In his ownership, it was very actively campaigned on hill climbs, sprints, and club races around England for the rest of 1964 through to 1966, often placing in the top three with his weapons-grade Ferrari. Taking a 250 LM to such events was the automotive equivalent of taking a gun to a knife-fight, and the car’s results speak for themselves. Chassis number 6105 (easily recognizable thanks to its registration number, RON 54) proved to be very successful in Fry’s ownership, and he often finished 1st in class and occasionally 1st overall. During the warmer months of the year, this car would be campaigned as often as four times a month. Seemingly every possible weekend that Fry could be out on the track in his Ferrari he made his way to an event and came home with a trophy in hand. In December 1965, Enzo Ferrari presented Ron Fry with a medal of recognition for his outstanding achievements in racing, which is a testament to the success of both Fry and his 250 LM. More importantly, even though the car was campaigned with much frequency, Fry never had a major accident, and as a result, the car remained in exceptionally original condition. This is an important point to note, as 250 LMs in particular were raced hard and consequently many fell victim to the hardships of motorsport. Therefore, it is nearly impossible to find an example that is in such original condition, boasting such extensive competition history, as 6105. In October 1966, chassis number 6105 returned to the Earls Court Motor Show, where it was displayed by Maranello Concessionaires in celebration of its racing success. Prior to the 1967 racing season, Fry sold his 250 LM in January 1967 to David S. D. Skailes, of Staffordshire, the owner of Cropwell Bishop Creamery in Nottingham, who reregistered the car on plates BFB 932 B. Shortly after acquiring the car, Skailes had the engine overhauled by the Ferrari factory in Maranello and, at the same time, had body specialist Piero Drogo install a long nose on the car, giving it a more distinctive front end. Skailes continued to race the car at events in the UK and even campaigned the car, with Eric Liddell, at the nine-hour race at Kyalami in South Africa, placing 6th overall. In October 1968, the 250 LM was acquired through Maranello Concessionaires by its third owner, Jack Maurice of Northumberland, who traded in his 275 GTB in order to make the purchase, and re-registered the car on license plates JM 265. Much like Ron Fry before him, Maurice continued to campaign his 250 LM on hill climbs and sprints around the UK, and the car returned to many of the same venues that it raced at under Fry’s ownership. For the 1970 season, Maurice had accumulated eight class wins, placed 2nd in the Shell Leader’s Hill Climb Championship, and won the Baracca Trophy and the David Poter Trophy for his exploits on the track. Following the success of the 1970 season, 6105 took a brief respite from competition and was featured in a pair of articles written by Jack Maurice for the Ferrari Owners’ Club UK magazine, a five-page article in the Winter 1970–1971 issue, titled "Speed-Hillclimbing in a 250 LM", and a two page article titled "The Duchess" in Autumn 1975. Maurice had the engine rebuilt at Diena & Silingardi’s Sport Auto in Modena over the winter of 1975/1976 and sold the car in 1976. After passing through Martin Johnson, chassis number 6105 was purchased by Richard Colton, of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, and once more returned to the track under his ownership, participating in even more hill climbs and sprints around the UK. Following another four years of racing, Colton decided that his 250 LM was deserving of a restoration. To bring the car back to its original specifications, Colton purchased an original Scaglietti nose for a 250 LM from Robert Fehlmann, replacing the car’s Drogo long-nose, and had it fitted to the car during its restoration by GTC Engineering. Following the completion of the restoration, Colton showed the car at a pair of Ferrari Owners’ Club meetings in the UK, one in July at Eastington Hall and the other in September at Avisford Park. AFTER 20 YEARS ON THE TRACK Nearly 20 years after it was delivered new to Ron Fry, in 1984, chassis number 6105 was sold to its first owner outside of the UK, Mr. Yoshiyuki Hayashi of Tokyo. Hayashi kept the car in his collection for 11 years before it was sold to another esteemed Japanese collector, Yoshiho Matsuda, who also owned a 250 GTO and 250 Testa Rossa. In Matsuda’s ownership, the car was featured in a book on his collection, titled Rosso Corsa – Matsuda Collection, as well as pictured in issue 92 of Cavallino magazine and featured in the Japanese magazine Car Graphic. Following a brief stint in the United States for three years with Kevin Crowder, of Dallas, Texas, the car returned to Europe and was owned by Robert Sarrailh and Andrea Burani before being purchased by Pierre Mellinger, of Lausanne, Switzerland. In his ownership, Mellinger exercised the car frequently, being driven and enjoyed by him on several European driving events. Mellinger drove the car on the Italia Classica in September 2011 from Maranello to Venice and back, as well as in the Tour Auto in April 2012. Also in 2012, chassis 6105 was driven by Mellinger at the Le Mans Classic, taking to the track for the first time in more than 30 years. Prior to this, the car received over $100,000 of work at GPS Classic in northern Italy, excluding an engine and transmission rebuild. This 250 LM was sold to its current custodian later that year, as part of The Pinnacle Portfolio, and while in this collection, it has been beautifully preserved alongside other highly significant Ferraris. From the moment one first sets eyes on it, the sheer level of character and originality is instantly palatable. Although exhibiting slight signs of use from its more recent outings, it is evident that this is a very well-preserved and original example of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated racing cars. The car’s Ferrari Classiche certification only further confirms that it retains all of its original mechanical components. Additionally, it is offered with a spare, un-numbered 128 F-type engine, as well as an additional crankshaft and a set of Borrani wire wheels on Dunlop tires. Of course, the factory-correct appearance of its Scaglietti nose makes it all the more appealing. The opportunity to purchase a 250 LM at auction is a rare occurrence, but the opportunity to purchase a pure example with known history from new is an unrepeatable opportunity. As one of the finest and most original examples of the last Ferrari to win overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the importance of the 250 LM as a model, and chassis number 6105 in particular, simply cannot be understated. Race chart available within the catalogue description. Chassis no. 6105 Engine no. 6105 Gearbox no. 16

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2015-08-13

1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato

*Premium Lot – Bidding via Internet will not be available for this lot. Should you have any questions please contact Client Services. 314 bhp, 3,670 cc DOHC twin-plug alloy inline six-cylinder engine with triple Weber 45 DCOE carburetors, four-speed synchromesh alloy-cased manual transmission with overdrive, front and rear coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel Girling hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in. The 14th of just 19 DB4GTs tailor-made by Zagato The only example delivered new to Australia; successful period racing career Restored by marque specialist Richard Williams and Carrozzeria Zagato Award winner at numerous European and American concours events Unquestionably the most desirable and attractive iteration of the vaunted DB4 ENGLISH SOUL, ITALIAN SUIT “Driving a 250 SWB is like wielding a hammer, it commands your respect through aggression and raw power. The Zagato, however, feels more like a tailored suit. It’s agile, sophisticated, and equally responsive…it’s a truly beautiful car to drive. And it fits perfectly.” – Peter Read In the early 1960s, Aston Martin and Ferrari were in a heated battle for supremacy in the World Sports Car Championship. It seemed as if every season brought about a new, race-ready vehicle to ensure each company’s victory, and the teams were consistently fighting each other for top honors. Competition was just as fierce in the showroom. Both companies were busy producing exciting and exceptional machines to appeal to their high-end clients, mainly in an effort to continue funding their racing exploits. Aston Martin changed the game in 1959 by winning that year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans with a decisive 1-2 victory, with four Ferraris left chasing in their rearview mirrors. As Ferrari updated the aging 250 GT “Tour de France” with the SWB Berlinetta, Aston Martin introduced the DB4GT in an effort to level the playing field, but it was not enough. Looking to hold back the onslaught of competition-specification Berlinettas, Aston Martin knew it needed something that would take the DB4GT to the next level. The solution was to approach an outside coachbuilder who could utilize their existing platform yet produce a new car that was both more attractive and competitive than its predecessor. The DB4GT was by all accounts a tough act to follow, but Carrozzeria Zagato was not one to shy away from a task. This would be an Aston Martin unlike any other, and when the completed product was unveiled at the 1960 London Motor Show, it was clear that Zagato had fashioned exactly what Aston Martin needed. Considered by many to be the coachbuilder’s finest design, the DB4GT Zagato is instantly recognizable as both an Aston Martin and a Zagato, thanks to the famed carrozzeria’s deft ability to masterfully craft distinctive design elements from each company into one harmonious work of art. Boasting a slightly elongated nose with a more pronounced grille, visually the car appears much more aggressive than the outgoing DB4GT. At the rear, the taillights were set into the fenders, and the C-pillar was reduced by featuring a larger rear windshield. While the DB4GT was already a highly attractive automobile, the Zagato coachwork gave the Aston Martin a more voluptuous appeal, smoothing out the harder edges in favor of a more dynamic and fluid shape. Changes were more than just skin deep, as Zagato and Aston Martin also endeavored to make this car faster than its standard brethren, reducing nearly 50 kilograms of weight and adding 12 horsepower to the total output. CHASSIS NUMBER DB4GT/0186/R The 14th DB4GT to be tailored by Zagato, chassis DB4GT/0186/R was completed on December 19, 1961, and then shipped to Australia shortly thereafter. Laurie O’Neill of Strathfield, a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, would be the first lucky owner. A successful businessman, O’Neill made much of his fortune from quarrying but also held the franchise to Peterbilt trucks in Australia. In his spare time, his preferred hobby was racing, and he owned a great variety of sports cars, ranging from Aston Martins and Ferraris to a Porsche 935 along with a handful of grand prix cars. The DB4GT Zagato would be O’Neill’s weapon of choice for the 1962 season, and the Aston would bring him great success. With Doug Whiteford behind the wheel, the car was undefeated in its first two outings at Calder and Longford on February 25 and March 3, respectively. On March 5 in Longford, Whiteford drove 0186/R to another 1st overall in the South Pacific GT Championship and a 4th-place finish in the Sports Car Championship on the same day. Whiteford and 0186/R notched one more 4th overall in the GT Scratch Race but failed to finish at the Sports Car Trophy race the following weekend due to tire issues. This would prove to be the car’s worst finish for the 1962 season. The Zagato would finish in no less than 3rd place over the next five events while driven by Laurie O’Neill himself and Ian Georghegan. They ended the season on a high note, finishing 1st in class in the GT Scratch Race at Katoomba on October 28, 1962. That year would mark the end of the DB4GT Zagato’s racing career, as O’Neill sold the car prior to the 1963 season. For the next 30 years, the DB4GT Zagato would remain in Australia with only two subsequent owners. Colin Hyams acquired the car immediately following O’Neill’s ownership in 1963, and it was shown at the 1965 Melbourne Motor Show during his ownership. Hyams then sold the car to Alex Copland in 1968, and it would remain with Copland in static storage for over 20 years. In 1993, the Aston Martin was acquired by G.K. Speirs of Aberdeen, Scotland, through Goldsmith and Young, who returned the car to its native land. There they performed a minor restoration so the car could be entered into vintage racing events. During this time, the Aston was frequently campaigned at such events as the 1997 Goodwood Festival of Speed and the Goodwood Revival in 1998 and 1999. The DB4GT once again returned to Australia in 1998, where it was driven for demonstration laps at the Melbourne Grand Prix and the Classic Adelaide 500 before returning to the U.K. Purchased by Peter Read from Speirs, Read decided that 0186/R was deserving of a complete restoration to concours standards. The process took two years from disassembly to completion, with work divided between Aston Martin specialist Richard S. Williams in England and Carrozzeria Zagato’s own facilities in Italy. No stone was left unturned to bring the car back to as-new condition, and although original metal was used wherever possible, Zagato’s own craftsman fabricated new panels, using the original bucks, when absolutely necessary. Williams completely rebuilt the car’s mechanical components, including the engine, suspension, and brakes, and was also commissioned to fully restore the interior as well as complete final assembly when the bodywork returned from Italy. Following completion in 2002, chassis 0186/R hit the concours circuit, where it immediately accrued an enviable record of accolades. On its very first outing at the Louis Vuitton Concours at the Hurlingham Club in June 2002, the DB4GT Zagato not only won its class but was also named Best of Show. That win ensured an invitation to the Bagatelle Concours d’Elegance later that month, where the Aston also won its class. Further Best in Class honors were also earned at Villa d’Este, Pebble Beach, and the Neillo Concours in 2007, as well as at the Presidio of San Francisco Concours and the Carmel-By-The-Sea Concours in 2009. At virtually every event the car attended, it found itself driving across the stage in honor. Shown most recently at The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering in August of 2013, the car remains breathtakingly beautiful. Not just a concours queen, 0186/R has also been driven respectfully on several tours, where it performed marvelously and without issue. As one of the finest DB4GT Zagatos in existence, it will surely continue to excel at future events. ONCE IN A GENERATION With only 19 DB4 GTs graced with coachwork by Zagato, just having the opportunity to see a DB4GT Zagato is a dream few realize. So treasured by their owners, not a single example has traded hands for the greater part of a decade. While its direct competitor from Italy would be the Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, it would be more appropriate to compare the car to the vaunted 250 GTO, though both were produced in greater numbers. Both Aston Martin and Ferrari pushed the envelope of performance when these models were new, both boast wins on the world’s most competitive stage, and both boast handcrafted aluminum bodywork with designs worthy of inclusion in any major art museum. However, in terms of rarity, nearly half as many DB4 GT Zagatos were built compared to the 250 GTO. As an engineering masterpiece and a design icon, the Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato has few peers, and its significance to Aston Martin, Zagato, and its genre simply cannot be overstated. The DB4GT Zagato embodies the essence of Driven by Disruption and deserves to be regarded not only as a historically significant machine but also as a groundbreaking work of art. Date Race Number Event Driver Result February 25, 1962 GT Handicap Race, Calder Doug Whiteford 1st overall March 3, 1962 GT Scratch Race, Longford Doug Whiteford 1st overall March 5, 1962 South Pacific GT Championship, Longford Doug Whiteford 1st overall March 5, 1962 South Pacific Sports Car Championship Doug Whiteford 4th overall March 11, 1962 GT Scratch Race, Sandown Doug Whiteford 4th overall March 11, 1962 Sports Car Trophy Race Doug Whiteford DNF June 10, 1962 Over 3,500 cc, Silverdale Hillclimb Laurie O'Neill 1st in class August 19, 1962   Geelong ¼ mile sprints Doug Whiteford 15.00 secs August 26, 1962 25 Catalina Park, Katoomba Ian Georghegan 2nd overall October 14, 1962 11 Over 2,000 cc, Sports Scratch Race, Warwick Farm Ian Georghegan 3rd in class October 21, 1962 Over 3,500 cc, Silverdale Hillclimb Laurie O'Neill 1st in class October 28, 1962 25 Over 1,600 cc, GT Scratch Race, Katoomba Ian Georghegan 2nd in class October 28, 1962 Over 1,600 cc, GT Scratch Race Ian Georghegan 1st in class Chassis no. DB4GT/0186/R Engine no. 370/0186/GT

  • USANew York, USA
  • 2015-12-10

1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Carrozzeria Scaglietti

An Italian operatic masterpiece of sound and color One of the finest original examples of Ferrari’s first mid-engined car Finished 8th overall and 1st in class at the 1968 24 Hours of Daytona A time capsule that is being publicly seen and offered for the first time in decades At times, the defining barometer of a motor car’s beauty is dependent on speed: how does it look at full speed as opposed to simply sitting statically on a manicured concours lawn or in a finely-lit private collection? By that qualifier alone, the Ferrari 250 LM is the epitome of design perfection. It is a purebred racing car that stirs the soul and enlivens the senses of not only the driver, but also the spectator, whether it’s being off-loaded from its transporter or roaring at breakneck speed down the famed Mulsanne Straight at Le Mans, in the middle of the night or in the pouring rain. Indeed, as Marcel Massini, the preeminent Ferrari historian declared, “Ferrari’s 250 LM is one of the most spectacular mid-engined sports cars ever built. A true competition race car rarer than the legendary 250 GTO, and the last Ferrari to win the gruelling 24-hour race at Le Mans.” Certainly the defining decision that affects the 250 LM’s shape is the mid-engined configuration, which allowed the artisans at Scaglietti to wrap the bodywork around the chassis in a heretofore unseen manner. At just under 44-inches tall, the car is low, sleek, and menacing. The voluptuous fenders over the rear wheel arches flow beautifully to the kammback tail, a feature that linked the LM to Ferraris of years past, and also to Ferraris of years to come. Add to that the state-of-the-art mechanical specifications of 320 horsepower, a rip-snorting Ferrari V-12 engine, a five-speed gearbox, four-wheel suspension, and disc brakes, and the resultant combination sees nothing but checkered flags whenever it takes to the track. CHASSIS NUMBER 6107 Chassis number 6107 is the 24th car of only 32 total 250 LM examples produced, and it is particularly special, because its first owner did not have racing in mind when he acquired the car. In fact, the car was used exclusively as a road car and enjoyed as such on open California roads! Steven Earle, of Santa Barbara, California, is well-known within the vintage racing community as the founder and longtime organizer of the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, and he ordered this car in the early summer of 1964 through Rezzaghi Motors, in San Francisco. The chassis was completed by the factory on July 23, 1964, with the body being eventually finished in Rosso Cina paint (a deep shade of red) and equipped with the LM’s standard spartan road car amenities, including blue corduroy cloth upholstery. Following completion, 6107 was shipped to San Francisco directly by air, not passing through the traditional conduit of importer Chinetti Motors, and it was delivered to Mr. Earle in November 1964. Registering the car for road use, with California tags reading “MKW 781,” Mr. Earle generally used it about town over the next several years, accruing only a few thousand miles during his ownership and photographing the car both at home and on the famous Mulholland Drive, where the car was an absolute thrill to drive. In 1966, desiring to attract less attention from police, he had the Ferrari repainted in a dark blue metallic color, and it was in this livery that the car appeared for sale in an advertisement in the January 1967 issue of Road & Track magazine. In the ad, Mr. Earle describes the car as “amazingly docile” and “very easy to drive.” Declaring the car to have accrued 3,000 miles on highways only, and never raced, Mr. Earle sought $14,750 for the rare Ferrari. In March 1967, a buyer was found in Chris Cord; he was a friend of Mr. Earle’s who resided in Beverly Hills and is better recognized as the grandson of E.L. Cord, the renowned founder of the pre-war American luxury marque of the same name. As Mr. Earle describes in a 1981 letter to Mr. Massini, Mr. Cord had previously purchased a different LM, but was dismayed when it arrived bodied in fiberglass, a factory decision on which he had not been consulted. In addition to experiencing significant flex, the fiberglass material caused Mr. Cord to develop an allergic reaction, eventually forcing him to sell the car in October 1965. During Mr. Cord’s brief year of ownership, the car was displayed by Chic Vandagriff’s renowned dealership, Hollywood Sports Cars, as the centerpiece of their stand at the Los Angeles Auto Expo in September 1967. RACECO AND THE GENTLEMEN FROM ECUADOR Soon thereafter, in early 1968, the race career of 6107 began in earnest, when the car was purchased from Mr. Cord by Guillermo Ortega and Fausto Merello, two Ecuadorean drivers who competed under the banner of the Raceco team. With little time to prepare, Raceco equipped 6107 for “Sports” Class endurance racing with the addition of four roof-mounted recognition lights and one so-called “Cyclops” lamp, which was centrally mounted on the front of the hood. Repainted a deep shade of red and wearing #34, chassis 6107 was entered in the 24 Hours of Daytona on February 4, where it was driven by Ortega, Merello, and John Gunn. It qualified for an impressive 14th place on the starting grid. Bested only by prototypes like Porsche’s 907 and the Autodelta team’s Alfa Romeo Type 33/2 entries (as well as a lone Shelby Mustang), the then four-year-old 250 LM managed an amazing 8th place overall finish and a 1st in class, outpacing every entry from the GT Class and numerous prototypes and Trans-Am cars. Two-and-a-half months later, the 250 LM was campaigned again by Raceco, this time at the 12 Hours of Sebring. With the car now painted yellow and racing as #39, the same team of drivers attempted to repeat their Daytona success, but a clutch failure after 33 laps forced an early retirement. In February 1969, chassis 6107 was entered by Raceco at the 24 Hours of Daytona again, with Merello, who was joined by Edward Alvarez and legendary Ferrari driver Umberto Maglioli. Unfortunately, the presence of the 1954 Carrera Panamericana winner was of no consequence, and the car (now wearing #38) was again forced to an early exit, this time retiring after lap 68 with engine troubles. Following these setbacks, Mr. Merello took the 250 LM home to Ecuador, where the recent creation of the Autodromo Internacional de Yahuarcocha in Ibarra was attracting some of the world’s top drivers. With Merello and Pascal Michelet, who bought out Ortega’s stake in the car, at the wheel, 6107 was entered at the inaugural Yahuarcocha race in 1970. Still competitive, Merello and Michelet led much of the race, until an engine failure forced them to retire. The car also competed at the 12 Hours of Ecuador on September 26, 1971, though it is unknown how well the car fared. Ultimately, Michelet purchased the other 50 percent stake from Merello and continued to race 6107 throughout Ecuador and Peru. It is also believed to have been entered by the French expatriate as #36 at the 1974 24 Hours of Le Mans, though the car never arrived for qualifying. Ultimately, in 1974, the technical rules were changed in Ecuador, and displacement was limited to 3,000 cubic centimeters. As a result, Michelet decided to sell the car. In 1975, he found a buyer in Londoner Robs Lamplough. In February of the following year, Lamplough sold this car to fellow Englishman Stephen Pilkington, of Lancashire; he was a known collector of fine race cars and immediately recognized 6107’s merit and potential, declaring “the chassis was never rusted. It was superb.” Ferrari specialist Bob Houghton conducted a sympathetic restoration of the car, with it being refinished in red, as when it was first delivered, but it was never actively raced again. In 1983, chassis 6107 was purchased by a prominent Japanese collector, who also recognized the car’s inherent importance, and he put it on display in his personal garage for the next three decades. Believed to have as few as 10,000 original miles on its fully matching-numbers driveline, this phenomenal 250 LM, now gently freshened and returned to driving state, represents the zenith of 1960s vintage Ferrari collecting, claiming rarity, importance of model, celebrated beauty of design, and a legitimate racing pedigree. It is offered now for the first time in decades, and it has not been seen by the general public in as many years. Chassis 6107 is notable as perhaps the most original example with such an important racing record. Indeed, few known examples of notable originality lack a competition record of such significance. In fact, 6017 further distinguishes itself from others, as it is a car of clear, documented provenance and period correctness, which stands in stark contrast to some of its 31 colleagues, where years of racing and ownership changes have taken their toll on originality. Associated with some of racing’s most illustrious names, this superlative Ferrari offers an extremely rare opportunity to acquire one of the finest known 250 LM examples. Its public availability, which is the first in many decades, is a moment of tremendous historic importance. With over 300 horsepower roaring behind one’s back, and the driver seated inches from the ground at over 150 mph, the racing enthusiast will attest to the symphony of power, color, and noise that is a Ferrari 250 LM at full throttle, be it at full speed in the Le Mans retrospective or racing through the switchbacks on Mulholland Drive. Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this car if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Addendum Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this car if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Also note this lot should have a diamond notation indicating an ownership interest rather than the triangle notation which indicates a guaranteed lot. Please refer to the catalogue terms and conditions for full explanations of the terminology. The title for this lot is in transit. Chassis no. 6107

  • USANew York, USA
  • 2013-11-21

1998 McLaren F1 'LM-Specification'

680 bhp, 6,064 cc DOHC 48-valve 60-degree aluminum V-12 engine, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with double wishbones, light alloy dampers, coaxial coil springs, and a front anti-roll bar, and four-wheel Brembo ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 107 in. The most iconic supercar of the modern era The 63rd and second-to-last road-specification F1 built One of two examples upgraded by McLaren Special Operations with an LM-spec engine, while retaining its road-specification interior with numerous upgrades, including satellite navigation Fitted with the additional Extra High Downforce Package The best of both worlds: a fully street-legal F1 with LM performance and modern upgrades for a fraction of an LM’s price The McLaren F1 is a car that needs no introduction, yet its significance to the history of the automobile in general warrants a brief overview. It was built and designed on a blank sheet of paper by a team led by Gordon Murray and Ron Dennis, who were looking to make zero compromises in the pursuit of automotive perfection. In doing so, they managed to write themselves into the annals of motoring history. On March 31, 1998, a McLaren F1 (chassis XP5) achieved a top speed of 240.14 mph at the Ehra-Lessien Proving Ground in Germany, setting a record for road going production cars that would stand for nearly seven years, smashing the previous record held by a Jaguar XJ220 by almost 30 mph. To this day, the McLaren F1 still holds the record as the fastest naturally aspirated production car. Even though it was purposely built to be the world’s finest road car, the F1’s performance was unrivaled on the track, and a McLaren F1 took 1st overall in the 1995 24 Hours of Le Mans. To those at McLaren, and in the opinion of many car enthusiasts worldwide, the F1 is the ultimate road car. Some would further argue that it is the greatest automobile ever built. CHASSIS NUMBER 073 The second-to-last “standard” F1 road car built, chassis number 073, was completed in 1998 and delivered that year to its first high-profile owner. According to information supplied in the owner’s manual (written in and signed by Gordon Murray himself), this car was designated as a European-delivery example that had been finished in AMG Green Velvet with a two-tone cream and green interior. The car was built over the summer of 1998, and it is noted as being delivered new on September 4, 1998. However, rather than being shipped out to its first owner, that owner specified for his car to be kept at McLaren’s facilities in Woking. Since the F1 was left in the custody of McLaren, all its requisite services and upgrades were performed by the factory during this time. A unique aspect of McLaren is that owners, current or original, of McLaren F1s have the opportunity to send their cars back to the factory to be upgraded to their desire. That department, now called McLaren Special Operations, was set up to service, upgrade, and personalize F1s for their discerning clients. Some cars that entered the MSO facilities received only minor cosmetic updates, while some received sweeping changes that left few stones unturned, in an effort to improve upon what is the finest road going automobile ever built by man. Chassis 073 is an example of the latter. THE ULTIMATE F1 In fulfilling McLaren Special Operations’ goal of making chassis 073 the finest and most desirable F1 on the planet, the car was fitted with the more powerful LM-specification engine. These engines were further optimized with parts derived from the GTR race cars to provide 680 horsepower at 7,800 rpm, which was accomplished by increasing the compression ratio, changing the cams, using different pistons, and swapping airflow meters for air pressure sensors. Chassis number 073 was also updated with larger radiators, to provide additional cooling, and a sports exhaust. It is one of only two road going F1s to be fitted with an LM engine. McLaren also installed the Extra High Downforce Package, which includes a revised nose with additional front wing vents and a more aggressive rear wing over the traditional High Downforce Package. It was also fitted with a 4-millimeter Gurney flap, to further aid the car’s high-speed stability. As the original headlights were a noted weak point on F1s, gas discharge headlights were fitted for improved visibility. A custom set of 18-inch multi-spoke wheels were fitted as well. Finally, the car was refinished in a brilliant orange metallic, which is a hue seldom seen on F1s and perfectly suits its stunning design. The updates did not stop there. Inside, the car has been fitted with a number of modern amenities. The interior was updated to GT specifications and retrimmed in magnolia leather and alcantara, with beige alcantara inserts in the seats. Numerous other modern improvements were made, including upgrading the air-conditioning system and stereo and installing a Phillips satellite navigation system, as well as a helicopter-grade car-to-car radio and intercom system. The intercom allows passengers to speak to each other with ease, even while accelerating north of 7,000 rpm. McLaren fitted the car with a larger 14-inch steering wheel, an LM-style handbrake, an LM-style instrument cluster with a shift light, and tinted side windows, and they also etched “073” into the tachometer. The final touch was by Gordon Murray: he signed the car just ahead of the ignition switch on the transmission tunnel. The sum of these upgrades produced a car which is lauded by many as the finest driving F1 in existence, as it is a perfect mix of the best aspects of both the original road car and the radical LM. Only five LMs were sold to the public (with an additional prototype being retained by McLaren), and while these cars are considered the very best, they rarely come available for sale and are often traded for nearly twice the value of a road-specification F1. Chassis 073 offers all that the F1 LMs offer, but in a package that can be comfortably enjoyed on the open road. The car was sold by its first owner in 2003 to a collector in Florida, and it has remained in the Sunshine State ever since. Since leaving the custody of its original owner, the car has only accumulated an additional 700 kilometers, meaning that the engine has covered just under 6,000 kilometers during its time with chassis number 073. It has only been serviced by McLaren, to ensure that it is appropriately maintained and ready to drive and enjoy at a moment’s notice. Please consult an RM representative to review the extensive receipts on file from 2013, which total over $80,000 and include such notable items as the replacement of a clutch and fuel cell. Accompanying chassis number 073 is its original exhaust, a correct original gold-plated titanium Facom tool roll, a Facom mechanic’s roll-around tool chest with a torque wrench, luggage, and its original owner’s and service manuals. It was also fitted with new tires. THE BEST OF THE GREATEST Few people ever get to see an F1 in person, and even fewer have ever had a chance to inspect one up close, let alone slide past the butterfly doors and into its three-seater cabin. Perhaps two or three hundred people have ever had the privilege of driving one, and fewer still have ever realized the dream of owning a McLaren F1. Today, RM Sotheby’s offers a rare and singular opportunity for a new caretaker to purchase chassis number 073, a U.S.-legal example. The successful bidder will sit behind the wheel of a car that combines the comforts of the original F1 with the performance of the radical LMs and the best of modern conveniences—all as set up by the talented artisans of the McLaren Special Operations team. Within the realm of the McLaren F1, a special car in its own right, chassis 073 is even more special, as it offers luxury options that are absent from the LM and performance above that of the road-specification F1s. Moreover, it is one of only two examples, making it rarer than a typical LM, and it is a car whose three-seat configuration may never be repeated within the advent of modern safety regulations. Here, in the ultimate version of the greatest automobile ever built, its new owner will become the next member of a close-knit and exclusive fraternity of enthusiasts, each of whom is dedicated to serving as the custodian of a McLaren F1 and enjoying it at speed. To call this car the "modern 250 GTO" is no exaggeration, nor is the exclusivity of joining this rarified club. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. McLaren Automotive has generously offered the next owner of this F1, along with a guest, a day to spend at their facilities in Woking, Surrey, UK. This invitation includes a tour of the McLaren Technology Centre and McLaren Production Centre, followed by lunch at their VIP dining room. Guests will also be invited to visit the McLaren Special Operations facility to see the heritage McLarens being restored, upgraded, and serviced alongside the latest models, as they arrive straight off the production line and are having bespoke modifications carried out. The tour also includes visiting the McLaren GT workshops to view the latest GT3 and GT Sprint vehicles being built and serviced. This invitation is in addition to any accompaniments made available in the catalogue description. Chassis no. SA9AB5AC4W1048073

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2015-08-13

1962 Shelby 260 Cobra "CSX 2000"

260 bhp, 260 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine with a single four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with upper transverse leaf springs and lower A-arms, and front disc and rear inboard disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. CSX 2000, the legendary and very first Shelby Cobra Offered from the Carroll Hall Shelby Trust The most important American sports car in history An unrepeatable offering after over five decades of single ownership ESTIMATE: PRICELESS! The greatest achievements in modern history are often so cataclysmic, so utterly earth-shattering and downright revolutionary, that humanity is left wondering, what if? What if Thomas Edison failed in developing the electric lightbulb? What if Henry Ford’s business went under before mass production of the Model T? What if the Wright Brothers failed to take flight, however briefly, at Kitty Hawk? What might the consequences have been . . . what might the world have looked like? Would society, as we know it today, be an ever-changing, hyper-speed web of 24-hour international business and culture, seemingly developing at a rate unheard of, even a century ago? The realm of possibilities is endless, almost frightening. Chaos theory refers to this as the “butterfly effect” – the notion that something remarkably small can have an extraordinarily large impact on the future. By that measure alone, then, Carroll Shelby, alongside Edison, Wright, and Ford, must be counted among the greatest innovators of the 20th century, for if it had not been for CSX 2000, American sports cars and racing would likely never have landed on the world stage, and the American auto industry would quite simply not be where it is today! The creation of CSX 2000 is the stuff of pure entrepreneurialism and vision. In 1962, only 10 years had elapsed since Carroll Shelby first stepped into a race car. The Texan was raised in a family without a car, but on that first day, in that first race, as he emerged from the MG TC in victory lane, the crowd took notice . . . and soon the world did, too. Race after race, win after win, Shelby developed a gentleman’s hobby into a full-blown career, circumnavigating the globe and piloting the most exclusive machinery in the world. Behind the wheels of Ferraris, Aston Martins, Maseratis, and other illustrious marques, he quickly developed a reputation at famed races from Monza to Le Mans. Amazingly, his career was a very brief but exceptionally successful flash in the pan; only seven years after stepping into a race car, he was the winner of the 1959 Le Mans 24-Hour race behind the wheel of an Aston Martin, and the following year, he abruptly ended his racing career due to health warnings. But this, after all, was the man who once raced with a shattered elbow by taping his cast to the steering wheel and who responded to his doctor’s warnings of heart problems by racing with a nitroglycerine tablet under his tongue! And this was the man who spent years studying European GT racing, from the inside out, developing a dream to build a car of his own and to compete successfully on the world’s greatest stage. He knew what it took to build a great car and, perhaps just as importantly, he knew the power of men like Enzo Ferrari, who he felt could bend FIA regulations with his might if any manufacturer came close to beating him. As depicted in the book Shelby’s Wildlife, “Shelby’s American blood boiled at the thought that European manufacturers such as Ferrari had the power to close the door on the efforts of an American like Lance Reventlow, who had spent a fortunate on his Chevy and Buick-powered sports cars.” Other privateers, like Briggs Cunningham, were successful too, but dominance over the European marques still escaped an American, even with Chevrolet’s own Corvettes incapable of returning victorious. After racing Cadillac-powered Allards as well, Shelby also truly knew what the potent combination of an Anglo-American hybrid might offer on the racetrack. CSX 2000, then, was the cornerstone on which Shelby built his success. At 37 years old and with little money to his name, within five years, Shelby built his company to employ over 500 people with a World Manufacturer’s Championship title to its credit. People like Ken Miles, Phil Remington, Al Dowd, and Pete Brock thereafter all became inextricably linked with the legend of the marque as drivers, managers, marketers, and visionaries. Although he considered a variety of platforms, circumstances pushed him toward A.C. Cars of Britain and Ford Motor Company in particular. The A.C. Ace was an exciting sports car, but the Bristol motor that powered it was suddenly going out of production in 1961, and with that, the company faced a problem. In September of that year, Shelby wrote to Charles Hurlock at A.C. and proposed the concept. Not long thereafter, Ray Brock at Hot Rod magazine informed Shelby that Ford was developing a lightweight small-block V-8 of 221 cubic inches. With the help of engineer Dave Evans at Ford in Dearborn, Shelby test-fitted this motor in a borrowed A.C. Ace and eagerly contacted Hurlock to let him know he found a suitable motor. From then on, things progressed quickly. The very first Cobra arrived in the United States, without a motor, in February 1962. This very first car, CSX 2000, was personally picked up at the Los Angeles airport by Carroll Shelby and his colleague Dean Moon before being brought back to Moon’s shop, where they installed the now-available and larger-displacement 260-cubic inch V-8 with a Ford gearbox in a matter of hours. And with that, CSX 2000 was complete, running, and driving. Wyss recounts Moon’s recollection: “We got drunk and drove it around—an impromptu road course we had set up between the oil derricks. When it didn’t break, even after all that rough treatment, well, then we knew we had a good car.” Shelby then moved from strength to strength. Dave Evans in Dearborn arranged a meeting with Don Frey, Ford Division General Manager. Shelby walked into the famous Glass House on Michigan Avenue for a sit-down that effectively kick-started the worldwide future success of Shelby American. Despite Detroit’s recent history of vilifying performance cars, Frey was an enthusiast and Ford was in the midst of promoting its new “Total Performance” marketing image, for which the new high-performance 260 V-8 in the Falcon Sprint was a perfect match. Several handshakes later and Ford Motor Company was now officially bankrolling Shelby for the first group of cars. Before this infusion of capital, however, CSX 2000 had been built on a shoestring. The entire company’s finances rested on this prototype and the securing of a successful deal for Shelby American that involved A.C. Cars and Ford. Amazingly, one of the car’s earliest functions was as a press car for the motoring trade, particularly with prominent magazines and in cities around the country to drum up interest and sales for the fledgling company. Time after time, however, what the public failed to realize was that every image of a Shelby Cobra in seemingly different colors was in fact the very same car – CSX 2000, repainted repeatedly in a stunt of Shelby’s own invention. Dean Moon initially wanted the car finished in his favorite shade of yellow, but as Shelby had already invited the Sports Car Graphic editors to test drive it and there was not enough time to paint it, they took 10 boxes of Brillo Pads and scrubbed the car through the night until the raw aluminum gleamed. An artist painted a stylized Shelby logo on the hood and trunk lid, and of course the “Powered by Ford” badge produced by Shelby certainly made the directors in Detroit quite pleased. Sports Car Graphic was successfully won over, decisively stating, “. . . we can safely say that it is one of the most impressive production sports cars we’ve ever driven.” The colors red, then blue, and finally yellow all followed for its official unveiling at the New York Auto Show, but regardless of the livery, Shelby’s genius, publicity-savvy approach was generally the same. Journalists were generally treated to a tour of Moon’s shop, followed by an impressive demonstration of a Weber-carbureted 260 V-8 on the dyno and concluding with a high-speed test drive through those famous oil derricks. In June of that year, Car Life tested CSX 2000, running an astonishing 4.2-second, 0–60 time. Road & Track accomplished the same and for its September issue, featured the car in the same shade of bright yellow paint applied by Dean Jefferies prior to the 1962 New York Auto Show, recording a top speed of 153 mph with a standing quarter mile of 13.8 seconds at 112 mph. Writers from Hot Rod and Cars, even an early ad in Playboy, all followed, but according to Wyss, who wrote Shelby’s Wildlife, only Car and Driver, in a 1970 road test, described the car exactly as Shelby intended: “The Cobra is a shockingly single-purpose car. No frills, no extra sound deadening, only the implements (tube frame, four-wheel disc brakes, fully independent suspension) required for rapid transit. The flat instrument panel has single white-on-black gauges – one to monitor every factor you might need to check, including oil temperature. The external body sheet metal extends right into the cockpit to form the top of the instrument panel and the windshield clamps down on the cowl, in traditional British sports car fashion, just inches in front of your nose.” In fact, CSX 2000 was also the only Cobra in existence for the first five months. The stakes were high. Should CSX 2000 have been written off due to a breakdown in testing or an accident by a careless journalist (or even at the hands of Carroll himself), the company would have suffered a monumental setback, one that it might not have recovered from. In the years that followed, CSX 2000 has remained an irreplaceable part of the Shelby organization. According to the aforementioned Motor Trend article, the car was first relegated to storage, likely un-driven, for about 10 years, and it was used by employees at the Carroll Shelby School of High Performance Driving. In the years that followed, it participated in a long list of events that supported the history of and were related to Shelby American and certainly the sports car hobby and industry as a whole. From the extensive celebrations at the Monterey Historics and Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2012, as well as the New York Auto Show the same year, to being named the most significant car of the past 50 years by Motor Trend in 1999, the list of accolades and honors is extraordinary. As the car sits today, it is breathtakingly original with the workmanship of Shelby American visible throughout. Speaking to Motor Trend, Carroll Shelby recounted years later, “. . . we strengthened the chassis tubes, we had to put different spindles and hub carriers on it, we had to put a different rear-end in it . . . there were very few nuts and bolts in that car that were the very same nuts and bolts as in an A.C. Ace.” As one analyzes the car, from front to back, it is also immediately clear that this is the only Cobra to be produced by Shelby with inboard rear disc brakes. It has the first set of hand-built and welded tubular headers, and the motor is cooled by an AC radiator. The trunk lid is longer than on production Cobras and in fact, the trunk itself is upholstered. Other telltale AC signs are the Ace bumpers, the Ace dashboard, and the hinges, which are flat, as compared to the rounder style. Also of note is the gas filler cap, which is the only one in this location, as well as the black foot boxes and the steel hand-made scatter shield over the bellhousing for the four-speed transmission. Finally, it is particularly fascinating to see the completely original upholstery and the chips in the paint, where one can see the multiple paintjobs used to promote the car during its early days. Ultimately, no degree of hyperbole could ever truly summarize CSX 2000’s monumental importance to the automotive industry. Had it never been built, had it accidentally been crashed by an employee or even a journalist, the impact on Shelby American would have been clear: 289 Cobras would not have gone on to dominance in the USRRC and SCCA Championships, nor on the international stage that was the FIA World Sportscar Championship, and specifically the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans. Certainly there would never have been any 427 Cobras, or any of the tremendously successful GT350 and GT500 Mustangs that followed, including, of course, the cars that won the SCCA B-Production Championship. And what of General Motors? Would they have been motivated to build their Corvette Grand Sports had the Cobras not come onto the scene with such force? Lest we forget Carroll Shelby’s personal leadership in the Ford GT40’s win over Ferrari at Le Mans in 1966 and his involvement in 1967, then it is clear that, fundamentally, without CSX 2000, Mr. Shelby would not have become the only man to win Le Mans as a driver, constructor, and team manager. Shelby American aside, CSX 2000 is also the catalyst for such cars as the Dodge Viper that followed years later, and the GT350s, which, in and of themselves, generation after generation, represent the finest American performance cars, consistently beating out foreign competition, none of which would have been possible if Carroll Shelby had not installed a 260 V-8 into an A.C. roadster one fateful day in Southern California. It is RM Sotheby’s distinct honor, on a personal and professional level, to have been entrusted to offer CSX 2000 at auction. With 260 and 289 Cobras exceptionally and inherently valuable in and of themselves, how does one comfortably estimate CSX 2000’s offering at auction in Monterey? How would one treat the Mona Lisa being removed from the walls of the Louvre or the Declaration of Independence from within the National Archives? Simply put, this car is of such historic importance to an entire industry and generation that, with the entire world watching, collectors and aficionados will celebrate a man, a car, and his priceless legacy. Chassis no. CSX 2000

  • USAMonterey, USA
  • 2016-08-19

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

260 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 38 DC3 carburetors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. Placed 1st overall at the 1956 Tour de France Auto The actual car that instituted the “Tour de France/TdF” nomenclature Raced and owned by the legendary Marquis Alfonso de Portago The fifth of only seven Scaglietti-bodied first-series competition berlinettas Awarded First in Class at Pebble Beach and Meadow Brook and the Prix Blancpain Award at the Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance Cavallino Classic Platinum award winner A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the most historically significant competition Ferraris of all time THE 250 GT BERLINETTA If there was to be one positive outcome of the horrific accident at the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans, it was the FIA’s return to emphasizing dual-use grand touring cars. This stimulated a new chapter in the design and build of road going competition sports cars from manufacturers across Europe. During the 1955 season, Ferrari disproportionately focused on its grand prix program, and Armando Zampiero took advantage by winning the Italian Sports Car Championship in his Mercedes-Benz 300 SL. Keen to return the title to an Italian manufacturer, Ferrari commissioned Scaglietti to build a new series of competition berlinettas centered on the 2,600-millimeter-wheelbase 250 GT chassis, which already qualified for the FIA’s new GT-class formula. Based on a short progression of Pinin Farina show cars that were fashioned after the 250 and 375 MM designs, the new Scaglietti coachwork featured a truncated fastback rear end with a large glass section, a long front deck with curvaceous fenders, frontally placed headlamps, and a large egg-crate grille. Beginning with chassis number 0503GT, Scaglietti built just nine cars in this first style before subtle redesigns saw an increasing number of louvers in the rear sail panels. Zagato built coachwork for an additional five examples of the initial series, bringing the total number built to 14. The first few berlinetta examples faired reasonably well in various European hill climbs and sprints over the summer of 1956, but the new road going competition model experienced its greatest success at the Tour de France Auto in September, a six-day rally of hill climbs, drag races, and circuit competitions. Piloted by a flamboyant and daring Spanish marquis, the new berlinetta was to become synonymous with the French race itself. THE MARQUIS DE PORTAGO Few figures in racing history, which is given to be awash in extraordinary men of great accomplishment, could match the Marquis’ lust for life, his mercurial success in racing, or his tragic demise. Alfonso de Portago was officially named Alfonso Cabeza de Vaca y Leighton, Carvajal y Are, 13th Conde de la Mejorada, 12th Marquis de Portago; he was born in October 1928 to a long line of Spanish nobility that included famous New World exploration figure Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, a onetime governor of Rio de la Plata. Portago’s grandfather was the governor of Madrid, and he was named for his godfather, Alfonso XIII, the last king of Spain. Portago’s father, Antonio Cabeza de Vaca, led a larger-than-life existence as an accomplished gambler and polo player who starred in his own movies and once took boxing lessons from the controversial heavyweight champion Jack Johnson. Cabeza de Vaca’s example would seemingly play a huge role in the young Marquis’ casual disregard for danger, which was perhaps emphasized by his father’s early death from a heart attack during a polo match. Following the elder Marquis’ passing, his widow (an Irish beauty who had inherited a vast American estate from her first husband) moved the young Alfonso to America for schooling. After being expelled from The Lawrenceville School, it was clear that the Marquis did not take to such formality, and his mother was soon forced to relocate him to her residence within the Plaza Hotel in New York, where he befriended an elevator boy named Edmund Nelson. The two boys would become friends for life, eventually experiencing great racing thrills together before their ultimate bonding experience in death. Alfonso de Portago, known to friends as Fon, grew to be an athletic young man, excelling in swimming, jai alai, and polo. His equestrian skills were impressive, and he was one of the world’s leading steeplechasers in 1951 and 1952, despite sometimes being thrown from his horse. Portago seemed to routinely challenge himself to ever-more difficult feats, such as his bobsledding stint, where he learned the sport’s nuances in roughly two weeks in order to lead the Spanish national team at the 1956 Olympics. He was also an accomplished pilot, once flying beneath a bridge to win a bet. Despite the hours required for all of these pursuits, Portago always found the time to chase beautiful women, marrying New York socialite Carroll McDaniel in 1948, at the age of 20. Though the couple had two children, the Marquis could never resist the lure of the feminine chase, and he was known to be a regular philanderer. His courtships of Revlon spokesmodel Dorian Leigh (said to be a partial inspiration for Truman Capote’s Holly Golightly character from Breakfast at Tiffany’s) and actress Linda Christian (an early Bond girl on a television version of Casino Royale) were his most high-profile affairs. In a telling interview with automotive writer Ken Purdy, Portago once said, “The most important thing in our existence is a balanced sex life.” Meanwhile, the Marquis and his wife lived in Europe for most of their relationship, and he began experimenting with midget car track racing in Paris during 1953. In October 1953, while attending the Paris Salon, Portago had a chance meeting that would change his life, forming a quick bond with Scuderia Ferrari driver Luigi Chinetti. The famed North American Ferrari importer invited Fon to be his co-driver at the Carrera Panamericana, which was to be held two weeks later, and the Spaniard couldn’t resist the opportunity, holding on for dear life in Chinetti’s 375 MM as a passenger for the entire race. With his eyes opened to the art of racing, exercised at its finest by Chinetti, Portago was bitten by the racing bug and soon bought his own 4.5-liter Ferrari. Starting to compete in earnest in 1954, Portago passionately threw himself into each and every contest, as he did with everything he pursued in life. Not even yet knowing how to change gears at speed, the Marquis teamed with the well-known Harry Schell in a Ferrari 250 MM at the 1,000 KM of Buenos Aires in January 1954, finishing 2nd overall. After a DNF at Sebring in 1954, Portago sold the Ferrari in favor of a Maserati A6GS and began to learn the subtleties of the various circuits and needs of his cars. He was leading the first leg of the 1954 Carrera Panamericana when his Ferrari 750 Monza broke down. In November 1955, Portago placed 2nd at the Venezuelan Grand Prix in the Ferrari Monza, finishing behind only Juan Manuel Fangio’s Maserati 300S. Fangio would later say of Fon, “I considered him one of the most courageous of all the racing drivers…a good driver and an excellent comrade.” In December, the Marquis’ efforts saw real dividends, with three victories at the Bahamas Speed Week in his Monza. Portago was recruited in early 1956, on the basis of his growing success and prestige as a Ferrari customer, to serve as an official member of Scuderia Ferrari, racing Ferrari/Lancia D50 examples in F2 races over the next two years, as well as various sports cars. He continued to campaign an assortment of four-cylinder Ferraris (857 S, 860 Monza, 500 TR, and 625 LM) and started racing one of Maranello’s new 250 GT racing berlinettas, chassis number 0557GT (the feature lot), in October 1956, winning the Tour de France Auto and Coupes du Salon, as well as the Coupes du USA in April 1957. His victory at the 1956 Tour de France was the first of four consecutive victories for the mighty 250 GT Berlinetta model at the French race, a foundation of its legend and TdF namesake. By spring 1957, Portago was widely considered to be one of the ten best drivers in the world, a phenomenal accomplishment considering that he had never driven a real race car prior to 1954. His outsized personality played well in the media, where he was endlessly quotable, and he was even occasionally provoked into fistfights. In a highly publicized interview with Sports Illustrated magazine, Portago said, “Racing is a vice and as such extremely hard to give up.” Many writers and racing peers were convinced the Marquis had a death wish, as he frequently drove his cars to extremes, very aggressively, and with little regard for long-term consequences. All of these factors ominously bore down upon the Marquis at the Mille Miglia in May 1957, where his own temerity finally became his undoing. Portago already detested the notoriously dangerous Italian road race, once saying, “It’s a terrible thing, the Mille Miglia.” But matters were made even worse when the last-minute substitution of an ill Scuderia driver forced Portago to take the wheel of a model he already disliked, Ferrari’s 335 Sport. With long-time compatriot and frequent co-driver Edmund Nelson as his navigator, Portago set off with reckless abandon, unable to stifle his competitive instinct despite his misgivings about the car and the course. For several legs, Portago managed the 335 S quite admirably, but in typical style, he refused to listen to the admonition of pit crews who noticed one of the rear tires rubbing away from contact with the fender. The Marquis ironically refused to waste time with a tire change. A famous photograph was taken of Fon kissing Linda Christian during a late pit stop out of Florence; she had flown out to meet him. Minutes later, just 30 miles from the finish line, after clearing a curve outside of Mantua, the worn rear tire blew out while the car was doing close to 150 mph. The rear axle failed and sent the 335 into the air, through a concrete mile marker and a telephone pole, before it careened and rolled through two ditches. Nine spectators were killed in the accident, and both Portago and Nelson were killed almost instantly. The tragedy of the accident extended beyond the death of the young Marquis at just 28 years old, though. It signaled the death of the Mille Miglia itself, as the race’s organizers, finally bowing to growing pressure to banish the deadly event once and for all, canceled the legendary contest. In doing so, they ended a golden era in European sports car road racing. CHASSIS NUMBER 0557GT This long-wheelbase 250 GT may be the most important Tour de France example. As winner of the 1956 Tour de France Auto, it is the primary namesake of the TdF moniker. Chassis number 0557GT is the ninth example of fourteen first-series cars and the seventh of only nine to be clothed in Scaglietti’s louver-less coachwork. Originally sold to the Marquis Alfonso de Portago on April 23, 1956, the car took some months to prepare, with original build sheets showing the specification of the rear axle on August 28 and the Tipo 128B engine on September 10. Registered with Italian tags reading BO 69211 and decorated with #73, the ravishing Berlinetta was entered by the Marquis in the Tour de France Auto on September 17, where he was joined by Ed Nelson. The 1956 TdF was routed at 3,600 miles and included two hill climbs, one drag race, and six races at various circuits, including Le Mans, Comminges, Rheims, and Montlhéry. Portago and Nelson managed to win five of the six circuits, taking 1st overall in the Tour and beating both Stirling Moss’s Mercedes-Benz 300 SL and future three-time Tour winner Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari 250 Europa GT. On October 7, the Marquis drove the Berlinetta to a 1st overall finish at the Coupes du Salon at Montlhéry, while two weeks later the car achieved a 1st in class finish at the Rome Grand Prix. Portago’s final triumph in this car came the following year at the Coupes USA on April 7, where he once again took 1st overall. Sadly, this would be the car’s final outing with the Marquis at the wheel, as his tragic death in the 335 S would occur a month later at the Mille Miglia. Following Fon’s passing, chassis number 0557GT was returned to the Maranello factory and was offered by the Portago family to Alfonso’s friend, C. Keith W. Schellenberg, of Richmond, Yorkshire, England, a Lichtenstein-descended shipping magnate. Schellenberg kept 0557GT for over two decades, and the car was seen little before being offered for sale in 1983. Chassis number 0557GT was then purchased by the esteemed Peter G. Palumbo, of England, who sold the car in 1992 to Lorenzo Zambrano, the late and equally esteemed Ferrari collector who resided in Monterrey, Mexico. During his ownership, the car received a ground-up restoration by highly respected Ferrari restorer Bob Smith Coachworks, of Gainesville, Texas. Shortly after the restoration, a leather-bound book documenting the car’s history and restoration process was produced to showcase its amazing story and restoration, and this book still accompanies the car. Often seen during Zambrano’s ownership with California dealer plates reading 31333, the 250 GT was exhibited frequently over the following 12 years, starting with a First in Class win at the International Ferrari Concours d’Elegance at Monterey, California, in August 1994. A few days later, the car was displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, again taking home a First in Class award. Presented as a non-judged entry at the Cavallino Classic in February 1996, the Berlinetta then won the Prix Blancpain Award at the prestigious Louis Vuitton Parc de Bagatelle Concours d’Elegance in Paris in September. Shown at Rétromobile the following February, the car then returned to the United States and was exhibited at the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance in August 1997, where it garnered a Blue Ribbon award. Presented again at Pebble Beach in August 2004, the Berlinetta won a Third in Class award and then took a Platinum award at the FCA’s International Concours a few days later. Following Mr. Zambrano’s passing in May 2014, this exquisite and historically important 250 GT was domiciled within his estate and is now offered for the first time in 23 years. The car remains in excellent condition following a recent service and has clearly been very well maintained after its restoration by Bob Smith Coachworks. As the first 250 GT Berlinetta to win the Tour de France and the fifth of only seven Scaglietti-bodied first-series competition berlinettas, 0557GT is without exaggeration one of the most significant Ferrari competition sports cars to ever be offered publically. It holds a highly significant place in Ferrari history and stands head and shoulders above the rest of TdF production as the most important example of the model. Also claiming the unique original ownership of the fascinating Marquis Alfonso de Portago, one of racing’s most flamboyant fallen stars, this sensational TdF is accompanied by copies of its original build sheets and period photographs, affirming its fantastic history. Undoubtedly the most important of all the 250 GT Tour de France examples, this influential long-wheelbase Berlinetta should attract the interest of top-tier Ferrari collectors and connoisseurs worldwide, as it would comfortably join the most significant collections of Maranello’s finest. This very TdF gave the model its iconic nickname with its stunning victory at that race in 1956, and as such, it is not only a valuable piece of Ferrari lore but also a hugely significant and successful competition vehicle. This represents the first time chassis 0557GT has been offered for sale in over two decades, and it is very likely an opportunity that will never present itself again. Make no mistake, this is a singular opportunity to purchase an important piece of Ferrari history. Chassis no. 0557GT Engine no. 0557GT

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2015-08-13
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1953 Jaguar C-Type Works Lightweight

220 bhp, 3,442 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber carburetors, four-speed fully synchronized manual transmission, independent front suspension with upper and lower wishbones, torsion bars, and hydraulic dampers, live rear axle with trailing arms, ‘double-action’ torsion bar, and torque reaction member with hydraulic dampers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96 in. Finished 4th overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1953 The second of only three Works Lightweights One of the final C-Types built; the rarest of the racing Jaguars Campaigned to multiple wins by Ecurie Ecosse in 1954 Driven by the who’s who of Jaguar racing fame Expertly restored to 1953 Le Mans specifications Extremely well documented; available for the first time in 15 years A truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the most important Jaguars ever THE C-TYPE AND LE MANS Few sports-racing cars have achieved such legendary status as the Jaguar C-Type, which won the 24 Hours of Le Mans twice for Coventry during the company’s domination of the event in the 1950s. The C-Type began life as the famed XK120 roadster, which had taken the world by storm in 1948 with its revolutionary dual overhead-cam engine. Several privateering customers entered factory-supported XK120 examples at the 1950 Le Mans race, and Leslie Johnson’s car was remarkably competitive, spending considerable time in 4th place. After watching the event, Jaguar founder Sir William Lyons and engineer Bill Heynes were convinced that a lighter, more aerodynamic body with modified XK120 mechanics had a strong chance of winning the race. Development work soon commenced, starting with a new lightweight tubular space frame, one of the very first uses of the technique in sports car construction. The XK120’s rear suspension was redesigned with additional positioning links, and the 3.4-liter XK engine received a new cylinder head, high-lift camshafts, racing pistons, and an un-muffled dual exhaust system, raising the motor’s output to 200 horsepower. Most noticeable, however, was the new car’s exquisite coachwork: a fluid aerodynamic conjunction of curves and bulges penned by Jaguar stylist Malcolm Sayer. The first three cars were hand-built in only six weeks and were the first purpose-built race cars for Jaguar. That purpose was to win Le Mans, which they did twice. Initially known as the XK120C (C for competition), the C-Type debuted at Le Mans in 1951 with a team of factory-sponsored cars. While two of the three entries were forced to retire early with oil line issues, the car driven by Peter Walker and Peter Whitehead took the overall victory—the first British car to win Le Mans in nearly 20 years. Jaguar not only won Le Mans, but they did so handily, finishing 77 miles ahead of the 2nd place finisher and setting the following records: fastest lap speed of 105.232 mph, 24-hour speed record of 93.495 mph, and greatest distance traveled in 24 hours at 2,243.886 miles. The triumph spurred considerable customer interest, of course, and the new racing model was put into limited production, with 50 cars built by early 1953. The factory’s 1952 Le Mans campaign was less successful, with all three Works cars retiring early due to cooling system issues. Considering the domination of Mercedes-Benz’ 300 SL, Coventry’s engineers realized that the C-Type required a few upgrades to remain competitive for 1953, and a final run of three cars began development. XKC 052: ON THE TRACK Chassis XKC 052 is the second of those three lightweight Works examples that were prepared specifically for the 1953 running of Le Mans. These cars constituted the final examples of the mighty C-Type (a last development car wore a D-Type-style body) and featured a number of upgrades over the prior examples. Improvements included new thin-gauge aluminum coachwork, more powerful Weber carburetors, a fully synchronized gearbox and triple-plate clutch, an additional upper link to the rear axle, and a rubber aircraft fuel bladder, amongst other lighter, weight-saving components. Most importantly, the three cars were the only lightweight C-Types built by the factory and were the first disc-brake-equipped entrants to ever run Le Mans, being the only cars so outfitted among the 1953 field. This distinction proved to be quite significant in the race’s outcome. On February 12, 1953, chassis number XKC 052 was tested by Norman Dewis in preparation for the upcoming race. Wearing #19, the C-Type was entered with its two sister cars (XKC 051 and XKC 053) during the Le Mans weekend of June 13, 1953, piloted by Peter Whitehead and Ian Stewart. As the sun set on the first day of competition, Jaguar, Ferrari, and Alfa Romeo appeared to be the teams to beat. The Jaguar drivers soldiered on through the night, certainly battered but not to be defeated. With the rigors of endurance racing taking their toll, only one of the three Ferraris remained by daybreak, while all three Alfas retired early. The C-Types, essentially unmatchable through the curves with their low weight and disc brakes, continued to set the race-leading pace, with 051 and 053 in 1st and 2nd place, respectively, and 052 only a few laps behind in 4th. The Jaguars continued to run strong, fighting through the fatigue and exhaustion, and by the 24th hour, this order remained, with Briggs Cunningham’s C5-R preserving 3rd place to stave off a 1-2-3 sweep by the Coventry team. With Ian Stewart concluding driving duties at the end of the grueling 24 hours, XKC 052 completed 297 laps with an average speed of almost 167 km/h. Following this smashing success, XKC 052 continued its factory competition campaign, with appearances at Silverstone and Goodwood, but mechanical issues resulted in two DNFs. By the end of the 1953 season, Coventry was beginning development of its next sports-racing model (soon to be known as the D-Type) for the following year’s Le Mans, as the company was far more interested in competing at Sarthe than other venues or series. Consequently, in November 1953, chassis number 052 was prepared for private sale with a rebuild to Le Mans specifications and was sold to the famed Ecurie Ecosse. On December 12, 1953, the Scotland-based scuderia registered the Jaguar with tags reading LFS 672. Painted the Ecurie’s signature color of Flag Metallic Blue, XKC 052 was mostly driven by Jimmy Stewart, older brother of famed Jackie, through May 1954, finishing 1st three times at Goodwood and once at National Ibsley. In early June, future Le Mans winner Roy Salvadori took over for Stewart, winning two events at Snetterton on June 5 before Stewart returned to finish 1st at Goodwood two days later. Ninian Sanderson then became the car’s principal driver for the next month, taking 2nd place at National Oulton Park on June 12 and at the National Charterhall race on July 11. Salvadori claimed another checkered flag at National Charterhall on September 4, following it up with a 2nd place finish at the Penya-Rhin Grand Prix on October 10. In total, XKC 052 netted Ecurie Ecosse eight victories during 1954, with four 2nd place finishes, four 3rd place finishes, and three 4th place finishes, which is a remarkable overall record for a single season. In the October 22, 1954, issue of Autosport magazine, the Ecurie Ecosse advertised all three of its 1954 team cars for sale, and XKC 052 was soon thereafter purchased by well-known privateer Peter Blond. Repainting the C-Type green, Mr. Blond used the car for club racing throughout 1956, finishing 2nd at Goodwood in March 1955 and 5th at the Spa Grand Prix in May, with Hans Davids at the wheel. Three 4th place finishes at the Goodwood International, BARC Goodwood, and the Crystal Palace International rounded out the 1955 season. The following March, Mr. Blond improved upon his BARC performance with a 3rd place finish at the Goodwood event. By mid-April 1956, XKC 052 passed to Maurice Charles, who continued the car’s racing endeavors with appearances at Goodwood and the Aintree 100 and a 5th place finish at Brands Hatch on August 6. Mr. Charles offered the car for sale in October, and it was soon after purchased by Jim Robinson, of Northampton, who ran the car twice at the Evesham sprints, finishing as high as 2nd in class. The owner advertised the car twice in Autosport during 1957, eventually selling the C-Type to Alan Ensoll later that year. Mr. Ensoll somewhat renewed the car’s competition relevance with some stronger driving in various hill climbs and sprints, taking 3rd place at Charterhall in May 1958 and 1st in class at Barbon Hill and Yorkshire. Second place finishes were achieved at Charterhall and Catterick Camp, with an all-out victory earned at the Castlewick Hill Climb in June. In September 1958, Mr. Ensoll sold the Jaguar to Tom Candlish, and it remained competitive with a 4th place result at Charterhall and 1st overall finishes at the Rest-and-Be-Thankful Hill Climb Championship and the unlimited GT race at Charterhall in July 1959. During an outing around this time, XKC 052 was involved in a moderate accident, and in late 1959, the important race car was sold to Ian Denney, who completely restored it, including a new lightweight body. After passing in 1969 to Brian Classic, the car was acquired in 1970 by Paul Grist, who cosmetically returned it to its former Ecurie Ecosse livery. XKC 052: ON THE ROAD In 1971, the C-Type found a more permanent home when it was purchased by the esteemed Martin Morris, one of Britain’s more astute collectors of the period. The car remained in the Morris family’s purview for over 30 years, finally reaching the status of rare collectible. In one of the C-Type’s final period outings, Stephen Curtis ran it at the Le Mans 50th Anniversary event on June 9, 1973, finishing a commendable 11th place. In 1986, Mr. Morris commissioned a comprehensive two-year restoration of XKC 052 that was publicly enjoyed a few years later with the car’s participation in the Jaguar factory's Cavalcades to Le Mans in 1991 and 1993. In 2000, Morris’s son assumed control of the C-Type’s care, and he soon sold the car into American ownership for the first time in its existence. XKC 052 was purchased then by the consignor, one of the world’s foremost collectors of important vintage sports cars and a regular exhibitor at premium concours d’elegance, including Pebble Beach. The consignor’s first order of business was a proper renewal to 1953 Le Mans specifications, which he entrusted to John Pearson, of the United Kingdom. The C-Type was completely mechanically refreshed and mounted with new, completely accurate, lightweight thin-gauge aluminum coachwork built by RS Panels to the factory-correct thickness. This is typical of these types of race cars, as they saw a great number of years of competition; the lightweight aluminum bodies were never intended to outlast their racing careers. The body was finished in the Ecurie Ecosse livery, with a fresh coat of the famous blue paint and decorated with #19 roundels. The 1959 replacement body has been retained for the car’s overall historical record and completeness. Following the completion of Mr. Pearson’s exacting work, the consignor began to enjoy the Jaguar on various rallies and tours, starting with the factory's C-Type Cavalcade to Le Mans in June 2001. XKC 052 was also featured on the cover of the December 2001 issue of Classic Jaguar World magazine. In August 2002, the car was exhibited at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as a display-only, non-judged entry; while in April 2005, it participated in the California Mille. Four months later, the C-Type drove the prestigious Quail Rally, staged in conjunction with the Quail Motorsports Gathering in Carmel Valley, California. Furthermore, XKC 052 is eligible for just about any of the most prestigious and exciting events the world over. Enjoying climate-controlled storage and regular maintenance and attention as needed ever since, XKC 052 has benefited from a pampered life over the last 15 years and still displays the beautiful quality of Mr. Pearson’s restoration. Now publicly available for the first time in many years, this historically significant C-Type is one of those rare sports-racing cars that truly embodies a crowning acquisition. It is a very significant component of Jaguar’s storied racing history and remains one of the rarest and most significant race cars of that period, let alone one of the most timelessly beautiful sports cars ever designed. The apogee of the C-Type’s technical development, this highly desirable Works Lightweight would make a spectacular addition to the most pedigreed collections, being enjoyed for its brisk performance in vintage rallies throughout the world. XKC 052 also promises acclaim at the world’s finest concours, offering future ownership a singular and impressive landmark in the Coventry legend. Chassis no. XKC 052 Engine no. E 1055-9

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2015-08-13

1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti

320 hp, 3,286 aluminum-block V-12 engine with six Weber 38 DCN carburetors, five-speed transmission, independent suspension with front and rear unequal length wishbones with coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. The 19th of 32 examples constructed Retained for personal use by William F. Harrah Presented with Red Book certification by Ferrari Classiche Multiple-award winner at 2014 Cavallino Classic Displayed at the 1969 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Frequent concours and historic racing entrant Please note, internet bidding will not be offered on this lot. Interested parties wishing to bid remotely are encouraged to bid via telephone or absentee. Please click here to register. THE 250 LE MANS In the early 1960s, Ferrari owned the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Even though the manufacturer was considered to be a newcomer on the international racing circuit, Luigi Chinetti and Peter Mitchell-Thomson took the prize in 1949, at the first incarnation of the race following World War II, putting more established marques on notice. More wins followed in 1954 and 1958, and their win in 1960 marked the beginning of an era of domination for the marque. The 250 LM exploded onto the scene at the Paris Automobile Show in October 1963. It was built as the replacement for the 250 GTO, and it was intended to compete in the GT category of sports-car racing. Yet, Ferrari did not produce the mandated 100 examples for it to compete in the GT class, and the 250 LM was forced to compete as a sports-prototype. Nevertheless, it proved to be an excellent competitor on the race track, and, a 250 LM was actually the last Ferrari to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans, taking the crown in 1965, which would cement its place into Ferrari history for eternity. Thirty-two examples were built in all, and while the majority went directly to race teams for competition around the world, a select handful made it into the hands of private owners to see road use. Many would have argued that a car that won overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans would be simply unsuitable for road use, but for the few well-heeled enthusiasts that could afford to purchase a 250 LM for street use, there was nothing better. CHASSIS 6045 Chassis 6045 was the nineteenth example of the thirty-two 250 LMs produced, according to noted Ferrari historian and 250 LM authority Marcel Massini. As such, it was assembled by the factory over the course of the summer of 1964, and it left, finished in Rosso Cina with Bleu-trimmed fabric seats, and bound for the United States. After crossing the Atlantic and arriving at Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut, it was sold to Bill Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors in Reno, Nevada, for a price of $21,250. Even though Modern Classic Motors was an official dealership, this car would not be immediately sold, and it was instead used as a street car by Harrah himself, who kept the car until April 1966. Harrah had a fabulous collection of all types of cars, from classics to contemporaries, but there’s no doubt that a brand-new 250 LM would have been the most eye-catching vehicle on the streets of Reno. Around 1966, it was sold through Cris Vandagriff, of Hollywood Sport Cars, to its second owner, Dr. Hart Isaacs, of Beverly Hills, California, for $17,500. At that time, it was noted that the car had only accrued 800 miles, which was a fair amount for this particular car considering Harrah had access to many cars at the time. Isaacs went on to use the car much like Harrah, and he registered it for road use. Over the next few years, he had the car serviced by Sal di Natale’s S & A Italia Sports Car Specialists in Hollywood, and it was fitted with a pair of external rearview mirrors. In May 1969, Isaacs showed the car at the 19th annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where the car was awarded Second in Class in the Special Interest Cars class. However, misfortune struck 6045 less than a month after its showing at Pebble Beach. In June 1969, Isaacs had an accident in the car while driving on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood following another concours event, and the resulting damage caused the left-side fuel tank to be punctured. Due to gasoline leaking from the puncture, the car caught on fire shortly thereafter, and the delicate, thin-gauge aluminum body was badly burnt. Disheartened by the accident, Isaacs parted ways with the car, and it was sold to Donald D. Simpson, an automobile dealer based in Bellflower, California, in unrepaired condition. The following year, Simpson made a cine film of the car, and it was evident that the chassis damage was around the passenger-side fuel tank only. It was also evident that the damage to the rest of the car did not extend beyond superficial, that the brakes, suspension, steering, and interior were largely undamaged and intact, and that the car was still rolling. The lightweight aluminum body had simply melted onto the frame of the car. Simpson intended to restore the car and race it. However, he finally decided against it and listed the car for sale in 1971. The car was later purchased by Ron Kellogg in 1972, and at this time, the original engine was removed and sold it to Stuart H. Baumgard for use in his 250 GTO, chassis 3987 GT. One year later, Kellogg advertised 6045 for sale, and it was purchased by Dr. Hamilton Kelly, who also owned 250 LM chassis 6023. Kelly only collected a handful of its parts from Kellogg and then left the car for some time in Kellogg’s storage. Later, when Kelly sent someone to collect the car, a few minor chassis tubes from behind the rear engine mounts were separated in order for it to fit into a pickup truck for transport. These tubes, as well as the crucially all-important tube that had the chassis tag tacked onto it, were retained by Kellogg, along with those items of original bodywork that remained. It is most likely that Kellogg had previously cut out the chassis tag tube to ease the engine removal when it was sold to Baumgard. From there, the car passed through noted Ferrari restorers Charlie Betz and Fred Peters before it travelled back to Italy, where it was brokered by Carlo Frosini and sold to the Ferrari Main dealer Giorgio Schon, who finally began the car’s restoration. At this time, some crucial photographs were taken by Schon of the chassis in a stripped state, and these clearly showed the damaged area of the frame from the accident and where the rear section had been shortened. It was clear that the chassis was original at the time, as it still showed evidence of the 1969 accident and fire damage. The 6045 number had been stamped on a front anti-roll bar mount in order to identify the frame at the time of import to Italy. To be sure, the chassis was later inspected by Florini Gaetano, the director of Ferrari Assistenza Clienti, and he confirmed that the chassis was indeed original. The chassis was subsequently sent to William Vaccari, whose facilities built the original 250 LM chassis frames for Ferrari when they were new. Vaccari also determined that the chassis was genuine, original, and correct. As part of the car’s restoration, Vaccari was then authorized to carry out the necessary repairs to get the car back to its proper factory specifications. By 1988, 6045 was sold in partially restored condition once more, to Ulrich Guggisberg, who continued the restoration. He commissioned Bachelli-Villas Carrozzeria Auto Sport, of Bastiglia, Italy, to construct a new body, and the mechanical work was completed by Tony Franco, of Maranello. The restoration was completed four years later, and the car passed through several owners in Europe, the United States, and a large collection in Japan. The car was displayed and raced at the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in 2000, and it passed through two more owners before it was purchased by its current owners in the United Kingdom in 2007. In 2009, it was decided that the car should be fully restored in order to both display it at concours events and to campaign it in historic racing. DK Engineering carried out this restoration. During this time, it is important to note that the 6045 number was found stamped on the front steering rack mount on the chassis, confirming the chassis’ identity and that it was the same item that was imported to Italy in the early ’80s. DK Engineering repositioned the brake ducts at the front of the car’s bodywork, and the driving lights and their proper housings were fitted in order to bring the car in line with its original configuration. At this time, it was determined that the engine fitted to 6045, stamped 6045/2 at the time, was found to be a late 250 LM type or 250P type, based on the head stud length and configuration. The restoration was completed in 2010, and shortly thereafter, the car was shown at the Ferrari Owners’ Club of England’s annual meeting in July 2010. The car would also be raced at the Silverstone Classic and the Goodwood Revival that same year. The following year, the car was invited to race at the support race to the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and it was invited to attend the Syon Park Concours, currently known as Salon Privé, in London. In 2012, the car was driven by Octane magazine for a color feature in their July 2012 issue, and it also appeared in Auto Italia in May 2012. Retracing the car’s history back to 1973 shows that Ron Kellogg sold the remaining damaged bodywork and other minor parts, including the chassis tube that had the identity tag fixed to it, to Richard Freshman following the sale of 6045 to Hamilton Kelly. Freshman had purchased 6045’s original engine from the owner of 250 GTO number 3987. During the 1990s, Freshman proceeded to build a replica 250 LM chassis in the United States, which he numbered 6045, as the all-new car was built around the original engine from 6045. In order to acquire the original 6045 engine and any parts whatsoever that may have originated from 6045, the replica 250 LM that Freshman created was purchased by the current owners of the genuine chassis 6045 in 2011. This purchase was accompanied by the remains of the original body. Metallurgical tests were immediately undertaken in the presence of noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, and the results showed that no part of it whatsoever was consistent with the legitimate metallurgy that the chassis tubes of a 250 LM should be, with the exception of the vital tube that had the chassis number tag fixed to it. That particular tube was one of the items that had been supplied by Kellogg with the original body to Freshman. With this evidence, a case was put forward to the Classiche Department at Ferrari for the certification of the car, and as a result, the original engine was fitted to the genuine 6045, and together with the replica (as produced by Richard Freshman), it was sent to the Ferrari Classiche Department in Maranello. A full strip and inspection was set about by the Classiche Department, and during the certification process, the vital chassis number tube was removed from the replica and built back into the original car. Following this process, the replica was totally destroyed by the factory to ensure that only the original car would be identified as chassis 6045. It is important to note that the car retains as many of its original parts as possible, including its engine, chassis, suspension, and instruments, and it is even accompanied by the remains of its original body. Once the engine had been deemed genuine, the Classiche Department reassembled the car and granted it full Red Book certification. The recently sourced original 6045 engine was fully rebuilt to correct factory specifications as well. While there, Ferrari also took the time to further improve the previously repaired damaged areas of the car’s chassis and bring it back to as-new condition. The restoration and rebuild was completed by Classiche in November 2013, and after 100 kilometers of testing, the car was deemed complete and was returned to its owners. Just this year, 6045 made quite an impression back in its adopted home when it returned for the 13th Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach, Florida, in January. Not only was the car awarded Platinum in class competition, but it also received the Ferrari Classiche Cup, for the most outstanding factory-certified Ferrari; the La Coppa Per Dodici Cilindri, for the most outstanding 12-cylinder Ferrari; and the Jet Aviation Cup, for the most deserving Ferrari, as selected by all the participants in the show. This 250 LM has proved its worth by winning awards at international concours events and holding off competitors in historic racing events, and it even put on a few road miles in between. There’s no doubt that 6045 is one of the most compelling Ferraris offered for sale in recent memory. Please note that this car comes with a lengthy and detailed history file. Interested parties are strongly advised to contact an RM specialist on site to inspect the file. Addendum Please note that the 2.5% duty is not applicable to the hammer price of this lot contrary to what is stated in the catalog. This title is in transit. Chassis no. 6045 Engine no. 6045

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2014-08-15

1968 Ford GT40 Gulf/Mirage Lightweight Racing Car

440 bhp at 6,800 rpm, 289 cu in OHV V-8 engine, four 48 IDA Weber carburetors, ZF 5DS25/1 five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and Koni adjustable shock absorbers, independent rear suspension with trailing arms, unequal-length A-arms, and Koni adjustable shock absorbers, and four-wheel stage II Girling ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95" Please note that this vehicle will be sold on a Bill of Sale only. • Debut win at Spa 1967 with Jacky Ickx and Dr. Dick Thompson • Extraordinary racing history; ex-David Hobbs, Brian Redman, Mike Hailwood, and Paul Hawkins • The first win for the famed Gulf/Wyer Partnership • Only Gulf team car to win both as a Mirage (’67 Spa) and a GT40 (’68 Monza) • First of three lightweight production GT40s; one of two surviving • Early use of carbon fiber-reinforced bodywork • Famous Gulf camera car used in the epic Steve McQueen film, Le Mans • Distinguished provenance, including Sir Anthony Bamford, Harley Cluxton, and others • Complete with original 1967 Mirage bodywork • Countless books, models, awards, and event participations In March 2013, it will be 50 years since Ford instituted the GT40 program. The purposeful mid-engine sports coupe is the finest Anglo-American supercar of the last century, with four straight victories at the Le Mans 24 Hour endurance race between 1966 and ’69. In 1966 alone, it finished 1-2-3 against Ferrari, in one of the most memorable photo finishes in the race’s distinguished history, cementing the car’s place in motorsports history and on the postered walls of teenaged bedrooms the world over. Its genesis alone is the stuff of legends and the subject of countless books, summarized most succinctly as a failed buy-out of Ferrari by Henry Ford II. Blank checks were signed in Detroit, engineering and racing heavyweights were hired, and Lolas were modified and readied for testing. GT/101, the first prototype, was assembled in March 1964, in time for testing and the imminent Ford-Ferrari battle at Le Mans in the summer. Undaunted by a lack of wins, Ford regrouped for 1965 with Carroll Shelby—already a veteran with his Cobras—taking over the GT40 MK II program. He delivered a win at Daytona with Ken Miles and Lloyd Ruby in GT/103 and a Second Place at Sebring with Ken Miles and Bruce McLaren in the same car. Shelby also ran the first MK II at Le Mans in June of ’65. Meanwhile, John Wyer continued development of the customer 289 GT40 racing cars. The stunning GT40 offered here, chassis P/1074, is very well-documented in GT40 history. It began life as Mirage M.10003, and in its debut at Spa, in May 1967, the legendary endurance racer Jacky Ickx and the “Flying Dentist,” Dr. Dick Thompson, finished First Overall. This was also the first win for any car under the fabled powder blue (1125) and marigold (1456) Gulf livery. Such an accomplishment on its own would be sufficient to impress any enthusiast, but it marks only the beginning of P/1074’s storied history. It should be noted that Ickx was only in his early-twenties at the time, had just made his first Grand Prix start the same year, and was on the cusp of beginning one of the great careers in motorsports that, to date, includes an extraordinary six wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, 25 podium finishes in Formula One, factory racing for Porsche, and everything in between, not to mention winning the Paris-Dakar Rally and even piloting the famous Ferrari 512S for the Steve McQueen film Le Mans. Unfortunately, however, this particular car DNF’d later that year at Le Mans and Brands Hatch, and then won at Karlskoga and finished Second at Skarpnack, before finished with a convincing win at Montlhery. Quite the stunning debut for this exceptional racing car! Following the FIA’s regulation change for the 1968 season, which reduced prototype engine size to three-liters and five-liters for production (Group 4) sports cars, with a limited build of 25 examples, Mirage M.10003 was taken back to J.W.A. in England for its conversion into a Group 4 GT40. The conversion was completed on February 23, 1968, whereupon it became GT40 P/1074, but has since remained complete with its original Mirage bodywork and could easily be returned to that configuration. It was the first (by serial number) of three lightweight racing GT40’s built for the J.W.A./Gulf team. Its chassis retained the unique Mirage straight substructure forward of the windscreen. Specific to the car were Stage II ventilated disc brakes, a lightweight frame, and a lightened roof. The body was described as “super lightweight with carbon filament aluminum, fully-vented spare wheel cover, extra wide rear wheel arches, double engine coolers, and rear panel vented (sic) for brake air exit.” The carbon fiber-reinforced bodywork used on the Mirage M1s, now P/1074, P/1075, and P/1076, are reputed to be among the first, if not the very first, uses of carbon fiber panels in race car fabrication. Currently, P/1074 is fitted with an original, period correct GT40 Ford 289 cubic inch V-8 with Gurney-Weslake cylinder heads, four Weber twin-choke carburetors, and a 351 oil pump with an Aviaid oil pan. During its active career, P/1074 (M.10003) was powered by four other V-8 Ford push-rod engines, including a 289, a 302 (1074), a 305, and a 351 (M.10003). It was painted in powder blue Gulf livery, with a distinctive, constant-width, marigold (orange) center stripe, which instantly identified it as J.W.A’s number two car. On several occasions, it was raced with triangular nose-mounted canard fins to improve downforce. From the outset, 8.5-inch front and 11.0-inch rear BRM Mirage wheels were fitted. Soon after conversion to a GT40, driven by endurance racing greats David Hobbs and Paul Hawkins, P/1074 raced at Daytona (February 3, 1968), where it was a DNF. This record would soon improve. On March 3, 1968, with the same drivers, it finished 28th at Sebring, then ran at the Le Mans Trials with Jacky Ickx, where it set a 3 minute 35.4-second lap record. Driven again by Hawkins and Hobbs, P/1074 won at the Monza 1000 Kilometre on April 25, 1968. On May 19, 1968, competing at the Nürburgring, David Hobbs and Brian Redman finished in Sixth Place. Hawkins and Hobbs teamed up in P/1074 at Watkins Glen to finish Second. This was the first race that P/1074 was fitted with the larger 302 cubic inch V-8 engine. It DNF’d at Le Mans (September 8, 1968), which was the last race of the season that year, again with Hawkins and Hobbs driving. In October 1968, P/1074 was loaned to Ecurie Fracorchamps and to a Belgian racer, Jean (Beurlys) Blaton, as a replacement for his P/1079, which had been crashed at Le Mans earlier that year. Beurlys and DeFierlant ran the car at Montlhery on October 13th, achieving an Eighth Place finish. Early in 1969, J.W.A acquired P/1074 again, and in its only race that year, David Hobbs and Mike Hailwood finished Fifth at the BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch in April, still running the 302 V-8. McQueen This car’s life was about to change dramatically. In 1970, David Brown, of Tampa, Florida, purchased P/1074 and P/1076 from J.W.A. He in turn leased P/1074 to Steve McQueen’s Solar Productions, of North Hollywood, California, in May of that year. Under the care of J.W.A, it was to be used as a mobile camera car for McQueen’s epic production of the movie Le Mans. Steve McQueen had insisted that the cars be filmed at speed. This necessitated that the camera car be capable of very high performance and keeping up with the “star” cars. For filming purposes, the entire roof section was removed, which left P/1074 with a windscreen that was just a few inches high. It is believed that this operation rendered the doors inoperable. Period photographs of the car show the doors securely taped shut. At the same time, the car’s fully-vented spare tire cover was removed and replaced with the less aerodynamically-efficient “twin nostril” unit from a road-going Mk III GT40. The modified GT40 was tested at the Fighting Vehicle Research and Development Establishment (FVRDE) in Surrey England. The radical changes to P/1074 resulted in a race car with adversely impacted aerodynamics and, in the words of Jonathan Williams, “diabolical” handling. During a test, P/1074 ran over a section of tank tread, which punctured one of its racing tires, precipitating an off-road excursion that dented the belly pan in a few places. Its driver, John Horsman, author of Racing in the Rain, and the film’s director, who was accompanying him as a passenger, were unharmed. P/1074 was employed as a camera car at the start of the 1970 Le Mans 24-Hour race, where its former driver, Jacky Ickx, was coincidentally also in attendance, racing a Ferrari 512S, no less! Its spare tire cover was removed, and a pair of movie cameras were mounted securely in the spare tire well. Several runs were made up and down the pit lanes prior to the race. It’s uncertain as to whether the car actually ran during the race. A gyroscopically-stabilized, compressed air-powered, 180 degree rotating Arriflex camera was mounted on the rear deck, where it could be remotely-controlled by a dashboard-mounted TV screen. A 35 mm manually-rotated camera was securely mounted above the passenger side door. Its operation required intrepid cameraman Alex Barbey to crouch alongside it in a small rotating seat. But the combination of these heavy cameras, along with the car’s substantially reduced aerodynamics and now less rigid chassis, meant the car was very hard to control at the 150 mph speeds the filming required. At this time, Dutch skid-pad expert Rob Slotemaker replaced a probably very relieved Jonathan Williams as P/1074’s driver. The much-modified GT40 “roadster” was used in its altered configuration for some five months, until the filming of Le Mans was completed. It was still finished in powder blue and marigold. After the film wrapped production, Harley E. Cluxton III (then of Glenview, Illinois) bought P/1074 from Mr. Brown. He tested the car at the Glenview Naval Air Station and said that crossing the runway arresting cables at speed was what he could only describe as “interesting.” P/1074 was sold to noted collector Sir Anthony Bamford (Staffordshire, England) in 1972. It was subsequently reconstructed by Willie Green, of Derby, England, who did the rework using a new roof structure obtained from Abbey Panels Ltd. The cut-down doors were replaced with early GT40 units, which meant the car was now equipped with early type “rocker” door handles instead of the sliding levers that are found on later J.W.A. racers. Other body modifications performed at this time included new rear bodywork, fabricated from a “standard” GT40 production unit with widened wheel flares, so the transom lacked the additional outlet vents found on Gulf GT40s, and the rear wheel arches did not have carbon fiber reinforcement. Finally, the number plate location had to be modified to clear the exhaust pipes when the rear section was opened. Willie Green raced the reconstituted P/1074 at several UK racing events. Subsequent ownership history is well-documented and includes Mr. Cluxton’s re-acquisition of the car in 1983, prior to another restoration. The peripatetic P/1074 was present at the GT40 25th Anniversary Reunion at Watkins Glen in September 1989 and at the 30th Anniversary Reunion in July, 1994. It has appeared in numerous books, on the “Competition Ford GT40” poster, and it’s been replicated in several models, both as the topless Le Mans camera car and in “conventional” Le Mans racing configuration. The current owner bought P/1074, and sent it to Harley Cluxton for a complete restoration in 2002, where it received a straight nose stripe and a fully vented nose cover. The doors were replaced with units featuring the later rocker style handles (as the car’s original sliding lever handles). The infamous cut-down tail section, which was removed when the car was reconstructed, reportedly survives in France. P/1074 has since been fastidiously maintained by its current owner. In 2003, Jackie Oliver drove P/1074 at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Again in 2004, this well-known and highly-respected GT40 reappeared at Goodwood fitted with nose canard fins and an adjustable height rear spoiler. In 2009, it was driven by its original driver, David Hobbs, at the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance, where it was awarded Best in Class. For a fortunate bidder, the acquisition of GT40 P/1074 represents a special opportunity. Aside from its current, stunning presentation, the fact that it is one of only two surviving Gulf Mirage M1s, in which form it accumulated much of its racing history, renders it particularly attractive to an enthusiast who now has the option of relatively easily returning the car to this configuration and actively campaigning the car with its remarkable Jacky Ickx provenance. This car’s impeccable credentials, both as a winning racer and as the camera car for the legendary Steve McQueen film Le Mans, as well as its long documented history of prominent owners and its meticulous restoration in J.W.A./Gulf livery, mark it as one of the most desirable GT40s, and indeed endurance racing cars, ever built. Please note that a number of spare parts accompany the sale, including 1967 Mirage bodywork. Please consult an RM specialist for further details. Special thanks to the GT40 Registry, Ronnie Spain, author of GT40: An Individual History and Race Record, and John S. Allen, author of The Ford GT40 and The Ford That Beat Ferrari, for their help and research on this car. Chassis no. P/1074 (M.10003)

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2012-08-17

1953 Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta 'Competizione' by Pinin Farina

340 bhp, 4,494 cc overhead camshaft V-12 engine with triple Weber 40 IF/4C carburettors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs, live axle with parallel trailing arms and semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes, and tubular steel frame. Wheelbase: 2,500 mm (102 in.) One of three works 375 MM competition cars entered at the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans Integral part of Ferrari’s 1953 Manufacturer’s Championship Well-known racing history, including participation at the 24 Hour of Spa, the Carrera Panamericana, and winning the 12 Hours of Pescara Only works race car to have been driven in the World Sports Car Championship by three World Champions: Hawthorn, Ascari, and Farina Presented and awarded at numerous concours d’elegance, including Pebble Beach, the Louis Vuitton Classic, and the Goodwood Revival Combining rarity, powerful mechanical specifications, important racing history, and ravishing coachwork, 0320AM is one of three 340/375 MM works race cars that Ferrari entered at the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans in its efforts to counter mount competition from Jaguar, Maserati, and Lancia. All three cars featured a brand new Pinin Farina body derived from the 250 MM design. Both 0320AM and 0322AM were built on a late 340 MM chassis with a 2,500-millimetre wheelbase Tipo 340/MM/53, each carrying a 4.1-liter V-12 engine, whilst 0318AM rode on the same chassis type, but it was powered by a 4,494-cubic centimetre long-block Lampredi V-12 derived from the 375 Formula One cars. Wearing number 14 at the 13th June Sarthe race, and piloted by Mike Hawthorn and Nino Farina, 0320AM advanced to 2nd place after 12 laps, before being disqualified for adding brake fluid during a pit stop, violating an obscure and old rule that prohibited the addition of any fluids before the 28th lap. The following month, 0320AM underwent a number of factory upgrades. The original engine, internal number 70M, was disassembled, and the capacity was increased to 4.5 litres. The car also received body modifications during this time. A more-streamlined nose with recessed covered headlamps was added at the request of the drivers to improve the down-force at high speeds, and the wraparound rear glass was also replaced with a smaller glass pane abutted by larger sheet metal sections to reduce headlight glare during night-time racing. Following a DNF, due to rear-axle issues, at the 24 Hours of Spa on 25th July, 0320AM contributed to the 375 MM’s competitive distinction on 15th August with a 1st overall finish at the 12 Hours of Pescara, with Mike Hawthorn and Umberto Maglioli behind the wheel. Chassis 0320AM was then delivered by the factory to its first private owner, Tullio Pacini, of Rome, Italy, on 9th October. In late November of 1953, this 375 was one of five Ferraris entered in the legendary Carrera Panamericana, where Enzo Ferrari showcased his cars to the North American market. With all five 375 MMs competing under the private banner of Franco Cornacchia’s Scuderia della Guastalla, 0320AM began the race driven by Mario Ricci. During the fifth stage of the Carrera, Umberto Maglioli’s 375 MM, chassis number 0358AM, lost a rear wheel, and he then got behind the wheel of Ricci’s 0320AM. He advanced the car from 8th place to a respectable 6th-place finish. Averaging an unbelievable 138 mph for 223 miles, Maglioli and 0320AM set a public road stage record that has yet to be broken. In combination with Guido Mancini’s 4th-place effort in 0322AM, Maglioli’s finish garnered enough points to propel Ferrari to the 1953 Manufacturer’s Championship. Chassis 0320AM appropriately finished the 1953 campaign with a 1st-place finish at the Circuit of Guadeloupe in December, once again driven by Maglioli. In 1954, 0320AM was purchased by Luigi Chinetti Motors and was imported to the United States. Initially purchased by Walter Luftman, of Rye, New York, this important Ferrari was sold in late 1955 to Mark and Louise Schellenberg, of Denver, Colorado. Following a minor collision to the front-end, the nose was modified by Charlie Lyon, of Denver. At this time, the opportunity was also taken to return the rear glass to the large wraparound style originally designed by Pinin Farina. Soon thereafter, 0320AM was acquired by Richard F. Merritt and William Rhodes in 1958. They in turn sold the Ferrari to William de Creeft, of Santa Barbara, California. He enjoyed the car for 12 years, until it was purchased by Gene Curtis, of Manhattan Beach (notable as Ernie McAfee Engineering’s head mechanic during the Southern California Scuderia’s mid-1950s heyday). Chassis 0320AM was restored in 1974 by Steve Griswold, of Berkeley, California, and two years later, it was purchased by Robert Sutherland, of Denver. Campaigned in August 1976 at the 3rd annual Monterey Historic Races, 0320AM was concurrently presented at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, winning Best in Class. The car was exhibited and shown by Mr Sutherland several times over the next 17 years, also running at Watkins Glen, Elkhart Lake, and the 1989 Mille Miglia. In March 1993, 0320AM was sold to Jerome Sullivan, of Hartland, Wisconsin, and it was soon refurbished by the region’s premier Ferrari restorer, the renowned Wayne Obry. The 375 MM was displayed at several Cavallino Classic meets over the next few years, before being acquired in 1999, by Sir Anthony Bamford, of Stoke-on-Trent, England, who presented it on 4 June 2000, at the Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance, winning the Best of Show and the TAG Heuer “Cheating the Wind” trophy. Exhibited at several discerning European events during this period, 0320AM was also featured in the December 2000 issue of Classic & Sports Car magazine. Acquired by the consignor in July 2006, this breath-taking example of the legendary 375 MM was treated to exacting body restoration work in August 2006, care of Shapecraft Ltd. in England. This work entailed enlarging the rear-wheel arch intakes and reshaping the nose to its original style with non-recessed headlamps. Currently, 0320AM is finished in its correct livery, as it appeared at the 1953 Le Mans. Exhibited at the press days for the 2008 and 2010 Goodwood Festivals of Speed, this sensational Ferrari offers exceptional racing provenance that is equalled by very few sports cars of its era. It is a beautifully restored and well-documented example, and it is one of the three original factory competizione cars that ran at the 1953 Le Mans. Most notably, it is the only known Ferrari works race car to have been driven by three world champions: Alberto Ascari, Dr Nino Farina, and Mike Hawthorn. It would constitute a crowning acquisition for any significant automobile collection. Chassis no. 0320AM Engine no. 0320AM

  • CANHamilton, Kanada
  • 2013-05-25

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

300 bhp, 3,286 cc dual-overhead-camshaft-per-bank Colombo V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and front and rear disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. Delivered new to Hollywood and motoring icon Steve McQueen on the set of Bullitt; owned by McQueen for more than four years Subsequently owned by TV star Guy Williams, of Zorro and Lost in Space fame Restored by Ferrari Classiche to McQueen’s original specification; Classiche certified in the autumn of 2013 Currently owned by F1, Indy, and Le Mans racer Vern Schuppan With its history confirmed by Ferrari, the car was proudly displayed by the Maranello company in its own museum exhibit, From Cinecittà to Hollywood Please note, internet bidding will not be offered on this lot. Interested parties wishing to bid remotely are encouraged to bid via telephone or absentee. Please click here to register. Steve McQueen: Hollywood legend, racing driver, and car connoisseur extraordinaire. The Cooler King and the King of Cool. Few, if any, movie stars are so inextricably linked with classic cars and bikes than the star of Bullitt, The Getaway, The Thomas Crown Affair, Le Mans, and the brilliant motorcycling documentary On Any Sunday. Of course, many of the movie industry’s leading actors in the 1950s and 1960s enjoyed the glamour that came with exotic motoring, but only a handful were the real deal when it came to being fanatical about cars. Only a few of those actually convey historical importance and priceless desirability to a classic merely by their ownership, and at the top of that exclusive list is McQueen. The Indiana-born marine-turned-actor, who was just as likely to be found in a car lot as a movie lot, was an obsessive enthusiast. He owned everything from his beloved Jauar XKSS to a Mini Cooper to a Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso, which was the car that kicked off his devotion to Ferraris. When he was at the height of his powers in 1967—the year in which he filmed both Bullitt and The Thomas Crown Affair—McQueen, impressed by the car that was featured in the latter of those movies, ordered a 275 N.A.R.T. Spyder from Chic Vandagriff at Hollywood Sport Cars. However, disaster struck on pretty much its maiden voyage, when a driver went into the back of the N.A.R.T. on the Pacific Coast Highway. Chic’s son, Chris Vandagriff, remembers, “There were no pieces for the N.A.RT., and we had a guy, Clay Jensen, that worked on it at nights. It took an excruciating amount of time to repair. In the end, he [McQueen] was pretty burned out and sold it soon after.” Frustrated with the N.A.R.T. being off the road, McQueen quickly bought another Ferrari from Chic Vandagriff, via Bill Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors in Reno, and this time it was a 275 GTB/4. McQueen had already experienced the more “refined” Colombo V-12 in the 275, having tested a GTS for the August 1966 issue of Sports Illustrated. He noted then, “With more power than mine [referring to the Lusso] and a better power arc from its six-Weber carburetors…I was pushing 140 mph…It would take a lot of persuading to convince me that Enzo Ferrari can do anything wrong. To me, he is one of the finest engineers in the world.” For many cognoscenti, the Ferrari 275 was the best looking of all Ferrari GTs in berlinetta form, which is attested by a roll call of such celebrity owners as James Coburn, George Harrison, Miles Davis, Eric Clapton, Clint Eastwood, and Peter Sellers. In 1964, it boasted Ferrari’s first transaxle and all-round independent suspension, but after just a couple of years, it was majorly updated and uprated. Significant developments included not just the introduction of the smoother and more powerful dry-sump, four-cam engine but also a redesigned transaxle and steadying torque tube. With 300 brake horsepower at 8,000 rpm from the 3,286-cubic centimeter V-12, the 275 GTB/4 was capable of 0–60 mph in 5.5 seconds and a top speed of 163 mph. In all, fewer than 300 Ferrari 275 GTB/4s were built, and they could easily be identified by their longer boot hinges and longer nose, which was a feature that was introduced for the berlinettas in 1966 to prevent high-speed lift. These 275 GTB/4s remain as exotic and coveted today as they were in period. To fill the gap left by the damaged N.A.R.T., McQueen bought a four-cam, specifically this car, chassis 10621, which was supplied to Modern Classic Motors by Maranello on November 21, 1967, after having been ordered a month earlier by U.S. agent Luigi Chinetti. Interestingly, Ferrari’s documents record that the factory price for the car was $8,244, compared to Chinetti’s price of $14,400! The improved Berlinetta may have appealed to McQueen, but the color of his new car most certainly did not. It was delivered in Nocciola (“Hazelnut”), a sort of metallic gold, and before he even drove the car, the movie star ordered it to be changed. The job was entrusted to Lee Brown, who did a lot of work on McQueen’s cars at that stage and had prepped the Mustangs for Bullitt. Brown picked up the car from Hollywood Sport Cars and mixed a color he dubbed Chianti Red, which was very similar to that on the Thomas Crown Affair N.A.R.T., the vehicle McQueen walks past in one scene and refers to as “one of those red Italian things.” The actor agreed to the color and added some other changes, such as taking the Borrani wire wheels and bespoke wing mirror from the crashed N.A.R.T.. and transferring them to the 275 (the first model Ferrari supplied with Campagnolo alloy wheels, because it was feared wire wheels were not strong enough), as well as sending the Nero interior off to Tony Nancy for retrimming. Brown recalls, “Steve was broken-hearted over the N.A.R.T. getting smacked, but he just really wanted another Ferrari to drive. He was in San Francisco filming Bullitt when he phoned me to say that he’d just bought a car. [He] asked me to collect it from Hollywood Sport Cars in Beverly Hills and to drive it to my shop and repaint it.” McQueen was photographed with the repainted 275 GTB/4 during the filming of the movie, and many on the Hollywood car scene remember him driving it regularly and with his customary gusto, one of whom was paint guru Junior Conway, who worked on the star’s cars for years. Conway says, “He drove his Ferraris so hard he broke the spokes on the wheels all the time, so he wound up putting solid wheels on the 275 GTB Coupe.” Conway was also called in on one occasion to repair some minor front-end damage. Even when McQueen parted with the 275 GTB/4 in 1971, it stayed resolutely on the Hollywood scene, being bought by Zorro and Lost in Space star Guy Williams, who traded in his Maserati 3500 GT to buy it. In the five years of Williams’ ownership, the Ferrari was again well used, although it was resprayed bright red. Steve Catalano, a.k.a. Guy Williams Jr, who earned his allowance washing the Ferrari as a teenager, says, “I was a teenager when he got the car. I remember the racing gate on the shifter, and there was a magnetic St. Christopher medallion on the dash from the previous owner, who was Steve McQueen. I spoke with McQueen years later in the early 1980s, not too long before he died, and he remembered the car well.” In 1976, Williams sold the Ferrari to J.P. Hyan, but following rear-end damage, it sat in Conway’s bodyshop in primer for most of his ownership, until California-based trucking magnate Robert Panella bought it in October 1980 for $32,000. Interestingly, when Panella took on the 275 GTB/4, it had some 20,000 miles on the odometer, and considering its lack of activity in Hyan’s ownership, the mileage confirms that both McQueen and Williams got plenty of use out of it. It was during Panella’s ownership that Richard Straman was commissioned to carry out a $10,000 N.A.R.T. Spider conversion, using Scaglietti’s own bucks, before the 275 was resprayed in yellow. The Ferrari stayed with Panella for some 16 years, before it was bought by Eric Zausner, who owned it for four years, until it wound up with noted UK-based collector Andrew Pisker. During the nine years that Pisker kept the Ferrari, it had another colour change, this time to Argento Autil. This occurred before Australian yachtsman and historic racer Peter Harburg was put on to the car by a friend and fellow Aussie, 1983 Le Mans winner Vern Schuppan, in 2009, and he subsequenty bought it. Schuppan, a member of Australia’s motor racing elite, counts a Le Mans win, a top-three finish in the Indy 500, and driving for BRM in Formula One amongst his many career highlights. As a McQueen fan, Schuppan had the vision to return the 275 GTB/4 to Steve’s 1967 specifications, so he acquired the car from Harburg and began a process of restoration at Ferrari Classiche in Maranello, Italy. Most of the original parts that were removed during the N.A.R.T. conversion were located by Schuppan and reinstalled by Ferrari, including the pristine rear glass and chrome surround, the rear deck (trunk lid), and the internal roof buttress metal pressings. In order to achieve perfect alignment and fit of the roof panel, Ferrar’s experts built a full custom body jig. So meticulous was the process carried out by Maranello’s finest in-house craftsmen that the 275 GTB/4 was even part-sprayed in its original Nocciola for assessment before it was returned to “McQueen spec” and sprayed over in Chianti Red, based on a swatch provided by Lee Brown himself. While the Ferrari was at Classiche, all other necessary work was carried out to return it to exemplary condition. Its mechanical excellence was subsequently proven when it was “vigorously” tested at Ferrari’s Fiorano test track by the current owner and Classic & Sports Car magazine. The magazine noted, “It is no surprise that the 275 GTB/4 is quick, nor that it handles well, but as an out-and-out performance car, something you could just stick roundels on and compete in just as it is, the Ferrari far exceeds expectations. And yet, with its smooth ride, sharp, low-geared steering, and flat, neutral handling at sane road speeds, it similarly surpasses your hopes in how usable it might be off the track and in the real world.” Since then, the 275 GTB/4 has been meticulously researched by former Porsche factory driver Schuppan, and it has been fully authenticated and certificated by Ferrari. Subsequently, the car has starred not only in the Museo Ferrari in Maranello (where it was a huge hit with visitors and the company was keen to keep it, with the car only being removed due to its sale,) but also at the Petersen Automotive Museum in California, where it was displayed alongside McQueen’s XKSS. Even without the fantastically rich history that was painstakingly put together by Schuppan, which includes photos, parts, and interviews with just about everyone who has ever owned or been involved with the car, this 275 GTB/4 would be a compelling buy, because although always extremely desirable, in recent years there has been ballooning interest in Ferrari 275s, especially the coveted four-cam variants, which now rank among the most collectible of the Italian company’s road cars. Add in its King of Cool provenance—unrivalled in appeal when compared to sports cars owned by any other star—and it is something very special indeed. As chassis 10621 boasts known and transparent history from the moment it was purchased by McQueen until the present day, it presents a unique opportunity to own an exceptional example of an iconic Ferrari GT with full Ferrari endorsement and unsurpassed Hollywood history. The Ferrari comes with a very comprehensive and detailed file of documentation regarding every period of its history. Please consult with an RM specialist to inspect the file on site. Addendum We are pleased to announce that this car has been selected by Ferrari of North America to participate in the most important Ferrari concours held to date. The concours will be held October 12 on Rodeo Drive, will feature sixty of the most important Ferraris, and features dinner with Piero Ferrari and Luca di Montezemolo. This title is in transit. Chassis no. 10621 Engine no. 10621

  • USACalifornia, USA
  • 2014-08-15

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Special Roadster by Sindelfingen

115/180 hp, 5,401 cc OHV inline eight-cylinder engine with driver-activated Roots-type supercharger and two-barrel updraft pressurized carburetor, four-speed manual transmission with synchromesh on third and a dog clutch on fourth, independent wishbone coil front suspension, independent swing-arm rear suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 128 in. An original U.S.-delivery example, with known history since new The most desirable “longtail,” “high door,” left-hand-drive configuration; as original Believed to have traveled only 10,277 miles from new One of a handful of known pre-production examples of the 540 K An elite landmark, offered for sale for the first time in decades The Mercedes-Benz 540 K was one of the most prestigious and, in the eyes of many, the most beautiful automobile of the interwar years. Its combination of power, light weight, and sheer beauty made it the master of the road, and it was a testimonial to the astonishing capabilities of the German automotive engineers of the day. It was also breathtakingly expensive, guaranteeing exclusivity among its owners; just 419 chassis were built, and of those, only a handful carried the superlative longtail Spezial Roadster coachwork that may well have been the high point of the coachbuilder’s art at Mercedes-Benz’s own Sonderwagenbau in Sindelfingen. The Special Roadster is the ultimate Mercedes-Benz 540 K. Remarkably, it effectively accommodates only two passengers. Yet, the Sindelfingen designers succeeded in designing a car that looks much smaller and lighter than it is. The gently sloping and instantly recognizable Mercedes-Benz radiator is tucked back at the front wheels’ centerline behind sweeping front fenders. The fenders then dominate the long hood before gently curving up to create the rear fenders, which in turn flow delicately down, wrapping into the tail. Subtle bright accents complement and outline the form of the body elements, punctuated by functional and styling details that draw the eye and mitigate the effect of the roadster’s size. Two massive exhaust pipes emerge from the hood’s right side and disappear into the fender, suggesting the power that lurks inside. Exceptionally priced at 28,000 Reichsmark, or about $12,000 US at the prevailing exchange rate, the Special Roadster was priced by New York importer Mitropa Motors at about $14,000 landed in the United States—about 40 percent more than the most expensive catalogue-bodied Cadillac V-16. As a result, only a mere handful of supercharged eight-cylinder Mercedes-Benz automobiles sold in the United States were Special Roadsters. Among them is the exceptional automobile offered here. REGINALD SINCLAIRE AND HIS 540 K Chassis number 130894 is one of the earliest known examples of the 540 K known to exist. Jan Melin notes in the first volume of Mercedes-Benz: The Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s that the factory recorded cars up to chassis number 130900 as 500 Ks, with 13 examples having the 5.4-liter motor and being, in effect, pre-production 540 Ks. The possibility of 130894 having special status or being used for display purposes while still in the hands of the factory, like other closely numbered Special Coupes and Roadsters, is still being explored at the time of publication. It was subsequently delivered through Mitropa Motors, the aforementioned U.S. distributor, in New York City on April 24, 1937. The original owner of the car has long been believed to have been Reginald Sinclaire of Larkspur, Colorado. The Sinclaire name is one known in many circles. He was born in Corning, New York, the heir of Henry Purdon Sinclaire, one of the founders of Corning Glass. Prior to U.S. involvement in the First World War, Reginald Sinclaire became a member of the famous Lafayette Flying Corps, a group of American volunteers who flew in the French Air Force. He relocated to the Colorado Springs area in 1921 and, with the exception of further service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, remained on his beloved Larkspur Ranch for the rest of his life. The 540 K Special Roadster was not the first or last great automobile that Sinclaire owned. A man of means and with a keen interest in automobiles at a unique time in history, he is very similar to his East Coast contemporary in New York, William A.M. Burden, in having owned important luxury automobiles both before and after the Second World War. Among the cars that were counted in the Sinclaire stable were a 540 K Cabriolet B and a Duesenberg Model SJ. According to recent conversations with two of his grandchildren, he continued to indulge himself in the best new cars in the post-war era; they distinctly recall several Mercedes-Benzes remaining on hand, including a 300 SL Gullwing. He also enjoyed a Maserati, an Aston Martin DB4, and a Bentley S3 Continental. The Sinclaire grandchildren note that many of their grandfather’s cars were kept in a large garage at the ranch. Others were maintained at the Broadmoor, a luxury hotel and resort in Colorado Springs. For seven decades, the Broadmoor had a garage where its affluent clientele would have their cars stored and serviced. The hotel also stabled polo ponies for many of those same patrons. A recent conversation with the Broadmoor’s archivist confirmed that Reginald Sinclaire was a familiar name; he stabled both cars and ponies there and was a close friend of the Broadmoor’s colorful owner, Spencer Penrose. Reference to Sinclaire’s pair of 540 Ks appears in the June 1948 issue of the Horseless Carriage Club of America Gazette, as part of a mention of notable old cars in Colorado: “Robert Donner of Colorado Springs has a Duesenberg; so does Reginald Sinclaire of Colorado Springs, and two Mercedes-Benz cars to boot.” A photo of Sinclaire with the Cabriolet B while on a hunting trip appears in Life magazine in 1949. It is likely that he kept the Cabriolet B and Special Roadster until the mid- to late-1950s, around the same time that he is known to have sold the Duesenberg. A CENTERPIECE OF GREAT COLLECTIONS In 1957, the Special Roadster appeared at an exhibition of antique automobiles, “Horseless Carriage Days,” held at the Denver Art Museum, as is also documented in the HCCA Gazette. It was shown by James S. Harrison, of 1 Cheyenne Mountain Boulevard in the affluent Broadmoor neighborhood, who was vice president of Import Motors, a dealership that specialized in new foreign cars. It is likely, given his address and profession, that Harrison would have known Sinclaire and purchased this car directly from him, some time prior to display in Denver. Later in the 1950s, the Mercedes-Benz came into the ownership of E.W. Price, a great enthusiast in Boulder, Colorado, who counted two Duesenbergs, an Auburn, and a Cord among his fine collection. However, his daughter Layne recalls that the 540 K was his special pride and joy. It was sold around 1962 when Mrs. Price lobbied for their three daughters to attend private school. The purchaser was Irving Tushinsky of Sun Valley, California, passing next to his good friend Thomas Barrett III, the well-known antique automobile dealer. Barrett in turn sold the Special Roadster to his greatest client of the era, Axel Wars, as part of what became a magnificent collection of important pre-war automobiles, believed to have numbered over 100 specimens. At the time of the Wars Collection’s dispersal in the mid-1980s, the 540 K’s next owner commissioned the well-known Mike Fennel of Saugas, California, to restore the car in its current livery. The Sinclaire 540 K Special Roadster has been maintained in the collection of its current owner since 1989. It presents in wonderful condition, with the odometer displaying a mere 10,277, a figure that is believed to be original. The car retains all its original drivetrain components, including engine number 130894, and a recent inspection by an RM Sotheby’s specialist indicated numerous original wood components bearing the body number 200335. The typenschild on the firewall, bearing the chassis number and order number of 218872, is also the original plate installed by the factory in 1937! SUMMARY OF A LEGEND Few of the Special Roadsters were built in this most desirable configuration, with high doors, a long tail, and factory left-hand drive. It is believed that only six left-hand-drive longtail roadsters exist today. These cars are held in esteemed collections as centerpieces and seldom ever come to market. When they do, they are even less frequently truly great cars that have led relatively obscure lives, such as the Sinclaire Special Roadster. The offering of chassis 130894, after 26 years in the same stable, is sure to garner tremendous interest from the world’s most discerning Mercedes-Benz collectors, who recognize this as an automobile of unparalleled elegance and uniqueness, as well as one that will afford them an opportunity for display at any of the most prestigious motoring events around the world. It is many things, among them the finest design of Sindelfingen, the finest factory coachbuilder of them all. It is also an important historical artifact of the West, as the pride and joy of one of the most significant and fascinating automotive enthusiasts—the airplane-flying, cattle-ranching, supercharged-eight-loving socialite Reginald Sinclaire. Special is, quite simply, an understatement. Chassis no. 130894 Engine no. 130894 Body no. 200335

  • USAPhoenix, USA
  • 2016-01-28
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1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa

300 bhp at 7,200 rpm, 2,953 cc single overhead cam 60? Type 128 LM V-12 engine, six Weber 38 DCN carburettors, four-speed manual gearbox, unequal A-arms, coil springs, Houdaille hydraulic shock absorbers and anti roll bar front suspension, live axle, semi elliptic leaf springs, Houdaille shock absorbers with four trailing arms rear suspension, four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,350 mm (92.5 in.) “The result of a race is 50 percent due to the car. When the car has been made, you are only half way there. You now have to find a driver and it costs more to train a good racing driver than it does to make a car. When I decide to take part in a race, I don’t think about my competitors. I try to do my best, without telling myself ‘I must beat Mercedes or Maserati’. For me the importance of a race is the technical result, that is, whether – given the same course and the same atmospheric conditions – established records have been broken. If so, progress has been made.” Enzo Ferrari’s telling insight on his views of motor racing. In 1957 the Commissione Sportiva Internationale (CSI) had been contemplating new rules to make sports car racing safer after the disaster at Le Mans in 1955 and Alfonso de Portago’s crash in the 1957 Mille Miglia, in which he and his co-driver, along with nine spectators were killed. Despite this appalling accident, Ferrari went on to take The Sports Car Championship at the final round at Caracas. The team had begun the year with the 3.8-litre 315 S, which was later developed into the 4.0-litre 335 S. Ferrari’s mind was already on his next creation – which would be one of his finest. Anticipating a reduction in capacity for sports cars by the CSI for the 1958 season, Ferrari began working on a car powered by the 2,953 cc, 250 GT, V-12 engine. Ferrari first used the name Testarossa on the four-cylinder 500 TR. The name “red head” was used because the car’s cam covers were painted red. The new V-12 car, developed under Carlo Chiti’s engineering team, was intended by Enzo Ferrari as a more powerful version of the four-cylinder car retaining similar handling characteristics and tremendous reliability. This robustness had been proven on the 250 GT unit with a single overhead camshaft. Chiti revised the cylinder head design, fitted high compression pistons, special conrods and six Weber twin choke carburettors. The first prototype, chassis number 0666, fitted with an envelope body similar to the 290 MM, appeared at the Nürburgring in 1957 and was tried by all the Ferrari works drivers. Olivier Gendebien set the sixth fastest time, no small feat against the more powerful Aston Martins and sister Ferrari team cars. The car finished a disappointing tenth, driven by Masten Gregory and Olindo Morolli who was given the drive at the last minute and was somewhat out of his depth. The second Testarossa prototype, chassis number 0704, was bodied by Scaglietti and caused a sensation when it appeared at Le Mans. With its distinctive pontoon fenders, the car was said to be one of Scaglietti’s very favourite designs. Ferrari’s coach building artisan explained, “Formula 1 was the inspiration for the shape, there were pods on the sides of the F1 cars, (Ferrari Lancia D50) and while I wouldn’t call them aerodynamic, they went well. We used a similar idea by designing the body to bring air in towards the brakes to cool them. In many ways the Ferrari 250 Testarossa was a Formula 1 car with fenders.” At Le Mans in June 1957 both prototypes suffered problems with new pistons. 0666 failed to start and 0704 retired, having run as high as second place. In Venezuela, during the final round of the championship, its potential was finally proven. Wolfgang von Trips and Wolfgang Seidel finished third in 0666 with Maurice Trintignant and Gendebien in fourth with 0704. 1958 would prove to be the 250 Testarossa’s absolute pinnacle. The factory cars won four of the six races to secure Ferrari’s third consecutive World Sports Car Championship for Constructors. Phil Hill and Peter Collins won in Argentina and again at the Sebring 12-Hours. Victory at the Targa Florio was taken by Luigi Musso and Gendebien and the 24 Hours of Le Mans was won by Gendebien and Hill. For 1959 the Testarossa’s bodywork was redesigned by Pinin Farina and built by Fantuzzi, Scaglietti having been sidelined by the increased output of Ferrari road cars. While the TR59 of Dan Gurney, Chuck Daigh, Hill and Gendebien took victory at Sebring in March there were to be no further wins and Ferrari finished second to Aston Martin in the Championship. In 1960 Testarossas won at Argentina (Hill/Gendebien) and Le Mans (Gendebien/Paul Frere) and took the Championship once again. Although the 330 TRI/LM would win at Le Mans in 1962 with Hill and Gendebien, 1961 was really the car’s swansong as a works entered car. Hill and Gendebien won at Sebring and Le Mans and Lorenzo Bandini and Giorgio Scarlatti won at Pescaro in the TR61 prototype. Only 34 250 Testarossas were ever built, although this figure is debatable, as it also includes both prototypes as well as the 330 TRI/LM. Some were manufactured purely as customer cars. Many of these would continue racing for years to come, often with great success in national and international competition. The car presented here, 0714, is the fourth Ferrari 250 Testarossa built and the second customer car. Finished in white, it was sold new to Piero Drogo who was then living in Modena. Although born in Vignale Monferrato, a small town near Alessandria in Piedmont, the Drogo family emigrated to Venezuela. Drogo raced extensively on the South American continent in sports cars and saloons. He finished seventh in the 1956 Venezuelan Grand Prix and later returned to Italy where he worked as a mechanic for Stanguellini in Modena. In 1960 he drove a Cooper Climax in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza, finishing eighth. In the early sixties he started Carrozzeria Sports Cars. They produced bodies for the stunning P3 and P4 Ferraris and the square-backed car which became affectionately known as the “Breadvan”. Ferrari 250 Testarossa chassis number 0714 was immediately modified by Drogo after he bought it. He added air scoops underneath the doors to help cool the rear brakes. His first race in the car was the 1958 1000 Kilometres at Buenos Aires, Argentina. The car was shipped to South America along with a factory car, ready for competition. Drogo had a trouble-free race in 0714 finishing a highly credible fourth overall with co-driver Sergio Gonzalez. Drogo’s next race in this TR was at the infamous 1958 Cuban Grand Prix in Havana. Juan Manuel Fangio had been kidnapped by Fidel Castro’s revolutionaries and the race was marred by a terrible accident. The event was abandoned amidst chaos and Drogo was classified 13th. 0714 was shipped back to Europe and competed in some minor events before being rebuilt and eventually repainted red. Drogo raced the car for the last time at the XII Circuito Internacional Vila Real in Portugal. 0714 was then sold via Luigi Chinetti to Alan Connell of Fort Worth, Texas in November 1958. Piero Drogo was later killed driving his 365 GTC Coupé in 1973. He ran into the back of a truck that had broken down in an unlit tunnel near Bologna. He was 46 years old. In 1959, prior to campaigning 0714, Connell had the car painted black with a very distinctive red nose, in the same style as his Maserati 250S. Connell raced 0714 extensively across the United States in SCCA National events. At the Pensacola National he was third overall and second in class. Fourth overall and second in class at Virginia International Raceway. Tenth and second in class at Cumberland and at Bridgehampton was seventh and took his first class victory. Another class victory was achieved at the next race at Elkhart Lake, with fifth overall. Buckley, Colorado saw a fourth and second in class, a result repeated at Riverside. At the Riverside Kiwanis GP he was eighth and fourth in class and he finished fourth overall and first in class at Montgomery. Connell easily won the Class D Modified title in 1959 and he often raced the Testarossa at Regional events. He was a very capable driver and took an outright victory at Mansfield, Louisiana. Eventually this fabulous Testarossa was returned to Chinetti’s in New York. The car was rebuilt and sold to Washington, D.C. resident Charlie Hayes. Hayes dropped a valve at the Thompson National in 1960 but finished second in a Regional at Vineland, New Jersey and fifth at Marlboro, Maryland. Hayes had the car repainted white at the end of the season and sold it to Carl Haas in Chicago. It was then purchased by Wayne Burnett who repainted the car red. Burnett was a journeyman driver and while he competed in nine National events during the 1961/62 seasons his best finish was sixth at the Meadowdale National in 1962. He fared better in the Regionals finishing second at Wilmot Hills, second at Minneapolis, an outright win at Lawrenceville, Illinois, and a third back at Wilmot Hills. In 1962, the original engine 0714 was removed and the dry sump unit from 0770 TR was installed. Disc brakes were added as well as a clear TR59 type carburettor cover. Burnett raced the car six times in 1963, finishing eighth at Elkhart Lake and with Luke Stear co-driving, 12th in the 500-mile race at the same circuit. The car was eventually acquired by Robert Dusek of Solebury, Pennsylvania in 1970 and was restored back to its original specification and colour, reunited with engine 0714. In 1977 the Testarossa was shown by Dusek at the 14th Annual Ferrari Club of America National meeting at Watkins Glen. In August 1984 Ferrari 250 Testarossa 0714 was sold to Yoshijuko Hayashi in Japan and in January 1995 was acquired by Yoshiho Matsuda from Tokyo. The same year Matsuda showed the car at Suzuka at the Forza Ferrari meeting. Partnered by Oyaizu, this car competed in the Mille Miglia in 1995 and 1996. Matsuda also drove it at the Monterey historic races at Laguna Seca in 1996. In 1998 the car was back in action at the Neko Historic Automobile Event at Honda’s Twin Ring Motegi Circuit. It competed again the following year. Also in 1999, 0714 was at the tenth anniversary meeting of the Ferrari Club of Japan at Suzuka. In 2004 the car was shown at The Quail in Carmel Valley and displayed at the Ferrari Club of America Laguna Seca track event. More recently 0714 has benefitted from a re-spray back to black and red – the same livery in which the car competed in so many races in the 1950s and 1960s. Furthermore, the car has been overhauled by marque specialists ensuring that it is ready to be enjoyed on rallies or track events in America and Europe. RM Auctions has had the pleasure of test driving 0714 and confirms that the car performed beautifully. The steering is light and the throttle response is immediate, giving the driver the feeling that the 12-cylinder engine is more than willing to power through the revs to the 8000 rpm redline. The symphony of the powerplant matched with the growl from the megaphone exhausts will make any enthusiast’s hair stand on end. The reverse lock-out, four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox is very precise and confidence inspiring. Easier to drive than a Ferrari 250 GTO and perhaps much more rewarding thanks to its more favourable power to weight ratio, 0714 is a truly fantastic racing car. Not only is the performance breathtaking, but the view over the bonnet when driving is simply one of the best in the world. It is the fourth of about 34 cars produced and the second customer car built. Moreover, it is one of only 21 cars to feature the desirable pontoon fenders and as such is considerably rarer than the famed 250 GTO, of which 36 examples were built. With its Scaglietti bodywork, 0714 is truly stunning – like a great sculpture it begs to be touched. Its incredible racing history puts the car far beyond most other 250 Testarossas, if such a thing can be said. This car would be welcomed with open arms to all the great historic race meetings and events around the globe. As these cars rarely come to market, the Testarossa is one of the most coveted in the marque’s history. With breathtaking looks, fantastic performance and handling, this is a true connoisseur’s Ferrari. ITALIANTEXT 300 CV a 7.200 giri/min., motore V12 di 60° Tipo 128 LM di 2.953 cm³ con un albero a camme in testa per bancata, sei carburatori Weber 38DCN, cambio manuale a quattro marce, sospensioni anteriori a ruote indipendenti con molle elicoidali e ammortizzato oleodinamici Houdaille, assale posteriore rigido con puntoni laterali e triangolo di reazione, molle elicoidali e ammortizzatori oleodinamici Houdaille, freni a tamburo. Passo: 2.350 mm “Il risultato di una corsa lo si deve alla macchina per il cinquanta per cento. Quando si è creata l'automobile si è solamente a metà strada. È giunto quindi il momento di trovare il corridore e costa di più formare un buon conduttore di vetture da corsa che fabbricare un'automobile. Quando decido di partecipare a una corsa non penso ai concorrenti: tento di fare del mio meglio e non dico a me stesso "debbo battere la Mercedes o la Maserati". Per me l'importante di una corsa è nel risultato tecnico, e cioè, a parità di percorso e di condizioni atmosferiche, se i primati vengono abbassati: allora vuol dire che vi è stato un progresso” (da "Ferrari l'unico", di Gino Rancati) Questo il pensiero di Enzo Ferrari sulle corse. Nel 1957 la Commissione Sportiva Internazionale (CSI) aveva emanato nuove norme per rendere più sicure le vetture da corsa sia a seguito del disastro di Le Mans del 1955 sia dell’incidente alla Mille Miglia del 1957, quando De Portago, il suo co-pilota e nove spettatori rimasero uccisi. Nonostante questo spaventoso incidente, la Ferrari andò avanti e vinse il Campionato Marche all’ultima corsa a Caracas. La scuderia aveva iniziato l’anno con la 315 S di 3.800 cm³, in seguito sviluppata nella 335 S di 4 litri. Ma la mente di Ferrari era già alla prossima vettura, che sarebbe stata una delle sue migliori di sempre. Anticipando la decisione della CSI per la stagione 1958 di una riduzione di cilindrata per le vetture sport, la Ferrari iniziò a lavorare su una vettura mossa dal motore 250 GT, V12 di 2.953 cm³. Il nome “Testarossa” era già stato usato sulla 500 TR quattro cilindri, che aveva il coperchio delle valvole verniciato in rosso. Nelle intenzioni di Ferrari, la nuova V12, sviluppata da un team di ingegneri guidato da Carlo Chiti, doveva essere una versione più potente della quattro cilindri, ma con le stesse caratteristiche di guidabilità e affidabilità. Questa robustezza era già stata riscontrata sui motori 250 GT con un albero a camme per bancata. Chiti modificò il disegno della testa cilindri, montò pistoni ad alta compressione, bielle speciali e sei carburatori Weber doppio corpo. Il primo prototipo, telaio 0666, dotato di una avvolgente carrozzeria simile a quella della 290 MM, fu portato alla 1.000 Km del Nürburgring del 1957 e fu provato da tutti i piloti ufficiali della scuderia. Olivier Gendebien stabilì il sesto tempo più veloce, un risultato notevole contro le più potenti Aston Martin e le altre Ferrari ufficiali. La vettura terminò la gara ad un deludente decimo posto, guidata da Masten Gregory e Olindo Morolli, chiamato all’ultimo momento e probabilmente non all’altezza della vettura. Il secondo prototipo Testarossa, telaio 0704, fu carrozzato da Scaglietti e destò grande sensazione alla sua apparizione a Le Mans. Con i suoi caratteristici parafanghi aperti (denominati dagli inglesi "pontoon fenders") la vettura è sempre stata una delle preferite di Scaglietti, che in seguito ha dichiarato: “Mi sono ispirato alle Formula 1, ai serbatoi laterali delle Lancia Ferrari D50, che sebbene non si potessero definire aerodinamici, funzionavano bene. Usammo un’idea simile per disegnare la carrozzeria e portare aria ai freni per raffreddarli. Sotto molti aspetti, la 250 Testarossa era una Formula 1 con i parafanghi”. Alla 24 Ore di Le Mans del 1957 entrambi i prototipi ebbero problemi causati dai nuovi pistoni. La 0666 non si qualificò e la 0704 si ritirò dopo avere anche raggiunto la seconda posizione in gara. In Venezuela, ultima corsa del campionato, emerse finalmente il potenziale della vettura. Wolfgang von Trips e Wolfgang Seidel si classificarono al terzo posto con la 0666, e Maurice Trintignant e Gendebien al quarto con la 0704. La stagione 1958 fu assolutamente la migliore per la 250 Testarossa. Le vetture ufficiali vinsero quattro delle sei corse e la Ferrari vinse il Campionato Mondiale Marche per la terza volta consecutiva. Phil Hill e Peter Collins vinsero in Argentina e alla 12 Ore di Sebring, Luigi Musso e Gendebien alla Targa Florio, e Gendebien e Hill alla 24 Ore di Le Mans. Per il 1959 la carrozzeria della Testarossa fu ridisegnata da Pinin Farina e costruita da Fantuzzi, essendo Scaglietti molto impegnato nella costruzione delle vetture stradali, in aumento. La vittoria a Sebring della TR59 di Dan Gurney, Chuck Daigh, Hill e Gendebien rimase l’unica della stagione e la Ferrari si classificò al secondo posto del campionato, dietro l’Aston Martin. Nel 1960 la Testarossa vinse in Argentina (Hill/Gendebien) e Le Mans (Gendebien/Paul Frere) e la Ferrari vinse ancora una volta il campionato. Nonostante la vittoria della 330 TRI/LM di Hill/Gendebien alla 24 Ore di Le Mans del 1962, il canto del cigno della Testarossa come vettura ufficiale fu la stagione 1961: Hill e Gendebien vinsero a Sebring e Le Mans, e Lorenzo Bandini e Giorgio Scarlatti a Pescara con il prototipo TR61. Solo 34 250 Testarossa furono costruite, benché questa cifra sia discutibile in quanto comprende anche i prototipi e la 330 TRI/LM. Alcune vetture furono costruite nella versione “clienti” e molte di queste continuarono a correre anche negli anni successivi, spesso con grande successo, in corse nazionali e internazionali. La vettura offerta, telaio 0714, è la quarta 250 Testarossa costruita, la seconda della versione “clienti”. Finita in colore bianco, fu acquistata da Piero Drogo, che all’epoca viveva a Modena. La famiglia Drogo, originaria di Vignale Monferrato una piccola cittadina vicino ad Alessandria in Piemonte, era emigrata in Venezuela. Drogo corse intensamente in Sud America sia con vetture sport sia con le turismo; nel 1956 si classificò settimo al G.P. del Venezuela e in seguito ritornò in Italia dove lavorò come meccanico presso Stanguellini, a Modena. Nel 1960 si classificò ottavo al G.P. d’Italia a Monza alla guida di una Cooper Climax. Nei primi anni Sessanta fondò la Carrozzeria Sports Cars, che costruì anche le carrozzerie per le magnifiche Ferrari prototipo delle P3 e P4 e per la vettura, dalla linea posteriore squadrata, in seguito denominata “Breadvan” (furgoncino del pane). Subito dopo l’acquisto, la 0714 venne modificata dallo stesso Drogo, che aggiunse le prese d’aria nella parte sottostante le porte per migliorare il raffreddamento dei freni posteriori. La sua prima corsa con la Testarossa fu la 1.000 Km di Buenos Aires in Argentina. La vettura fu inviata in Sud America, assieme a una vettura ufficiale, già pronta per la gara. Drogo, in coppia con Sergio Gonzales, non ebbe alcun problema in corsa e conquistò un notevole quarto posto assoluto. La corsa successiva fu il tristemente famoso G.P. di Cuba all’Avana del 1958. Juan Manuel Fangio era stato rapito dai rivoluzionari di Fidel Castro e la corsa, funestata da un terribile incidente, fu interrotta nel caos più completo. Drogo fu classificato al tredicesimo posto. La 0714 ritornò in Europa e fu utilizzata in alcune corse minori prima di essere revisionata e riverniciata in rosso. Drogo la guidò per l’ultima volta al XII Circuito Internazionale di Villa Real, in Portogallo e quindi la vendette, tramite Luigi Chinetti, nel novembre 1958 a Alan Connell di Fort Worth, in Texas. Nel 1973, all’età di 46 anni, Piero Drogo morì per un incidente mentre era alla guida della sua Ferrari 365 GTC: si schiantò contro la parte posteriore di un autocarro rimasto in panne in una buia galleria nelle vicinanze di Bologna. Connell fece riverniciare la vettura in nero con il muso rosso, la stessa caratteristica livrea della sua Maserati 250S, e la utilizzò intensamente nell’arco della stagione 1959 in numerose corse del campionato nazionale americano SCCA, con ottimi risultati: - Pensacola National: terzo assoluto e secondo di classe; - Virginia International Raceway: quarto assoluto e secondo di classe; - Cumberland: decimo e secondo di classe; - Bridgehampton: settimo e, finalmente, primo di classe; - Elkhart Lake: quinto e primo di classe; - Buckley, Colorado: quarto e secondo di classe; - Riverside: quarto e secondo di classe; - Riverside Kiwanis GP: ottavo e quarto di classe, - Montgomery; quarto e primo di classe. Ottimo pilota, Connell si aggiudicò facilmente il titolo 1959 per la Classe D Modificate e spesso corse con la Testarossa anche in eventi regionali, aggiudicandosi la vittoria assoluta a Mansfield, Louisiana. Infine questa favolosa Testarossa fu rimandata da Chinetti a New York, che la restaurò e la rivendette a Charles Hayes, residente a Washington, D.C. Nel corso della stagione 1960, questi piegò una valvola al Thompson National, si piazzò secondo in una corsa regionale a Vineland, New Jersey, e quinto a Marlboro, Maryland. Alla fine della stagione, riverniciò la vettura in bianco e la rivendette a Carl Haas di Chicago. In seguito la vettura fu acquistata da Wayne Burnett che cambiò nuovamente il colore in rosso. Burnett era un mediocre pilota e pur partecipando a nove corse nazionali nelle stagioni 1961 e 1962, ottenne come migliore piazzamento un sesto posto al Meadowdale National del 1962. Fece meglio nelle corse regionali, con due secondi posti a Wilmot Hills e Minneapolis, una vittoria assoluta a Lawrenceville, Illinois, e un terzo posto ancora a Wilmot Hills. Nel 1962 il motore originale n. 0714 fu sostituito con il motore a carter secco proveniente dal telaio 0770TR, furono montati i freni a disco e fu aggiunta una copertura trasparente per i carburatori tipo TR59. Nel 1963 Burnett partecipò a sei corse, finendo ottavo a Elkhart Lake e 12mo, in coppia con Luke Stear, alla 500 Miglia sullo stesso circuito. Nel 1970 la vettura fu acquistata da Robert Dusek di Solebury, Pennsylvania, fu restaurata nelle sue specifiche originali, compreso il colore, e nuovamente dotata del motore n. 0714. Nel 1977 fu esposta da Dusek alla 14^ edizione del raduno annuale del Ferrari Club America a Watkins Glen. Nell’agosto 1984, la 0714 fu venduta a Yoshijuko Hayashi in Giappone e nel gennaio 1995 fu acquistata da Yoshiho Matsuda di Tokyo. In quello stesso anno Matsuda portò la vettura al raduno Forza Ferrari di Suzuka e, in coppia con Oyaizu, alla Mille Miglia storica; nel 1996 la guidò ancora alla Mille Miglia storica e alle corse storiche di Monterey a Laguna Seca. Nel 1998 la vettura fu riportata in corsa al Neko Historic Automobile Event sul circuito Twin Ring di Motegi, di proprietà della Honda; nel 1999 corse di nuovo a Motegi e quindi a Suzuka al raduno del Ferrari Club Giappone. Nel 2004 fu esposta a The Quail, nella Carmel Valley in California, e al raduno del Ferrari Club America sul circuito di Laguna Seca. In anni più recenti, la 0714 è stata nuovamente riverniciata in nero e rosso, la stessa livrea con la quale aveva corso in tante gare fra gli anni Cinquanta e Sessanta. Inoltre, è stata revisionata da specialisti della marca ed è pronta per essere utilizzata in manifestazioni su strada o in pista in America e in Europa. RM Auctions ha avuto il piacere di effettuare una prova della 0714 e può confermare che la vettura si comporta in maniera egregia. Lo sterzo è leggero e la risposta dell’acceleratore è immediata dando al pilota la sensazione che il motore 12 cilindri è ben disposto a salire fino al limite degli 8.000 giri/min. La sinfonia del motore accoppiata con il brontolio dei tubi di scarico a megafono farà rizzare i capelli a ogni appassionato. Il cambio sincronizzato a quattro marce, con il blocco per la retromarcia, è molto preciso e dà confidenza. Più facile da guidare di una 250 GTO e forse molto più gratificante grazie al suo rapporto peso/potenza più favorevole, la 0714 è veramente una fantastica vettura da corsa. Non solo per le prestazioni mozzafiato, ma anche per la vista oltre il cofano da dietro il volante che è semplicemente una delle più belle del mondo. È la quarta di circa 34 vetture costruite e la seconda della versione “clienti”. In più è una delle sole 21 vetture con la carrozzeria “pontoon fender” e come tale è molto più rara della 250 GTO, costruita in 36 esemplari. Con la sua carrozzeria Scaglietti, la 0714 è veramente meravigliosa, e come una bellissima scultura chiede solo di essere toccata. La sua notevole storia agonistica la pone ben al di là della maggior parte delle altre 250 Testarossa, se ci è consentito dire. Questa vettura sarà accolta a braccia aperte a tutte le maggiori rievocazioni e manifestazioni storiche del mondo. Poiché raramente vetture di questo calibro arrivano sul mercato, la Testarossa è uno dei più desiderati modelli della storia della casa. Con una linea mozzafiato, prestazioni fantastiche e grande guidabilità, quest