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Babe ruth 1920 game bat signed and presented to chicago mayor william
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Babe in the Big Apple "They all flock to see him,” because the American fan "likes the fellow who carries the wallop." – Miller Huggins In a time when baseball, reeling from the 1919 Black Sox scandal, declining attendance and declining credibility, needed a revitalization, Babe Ruth's bat saved the day. By destiny’s hand, the most visible, dominating, and popular athlete in American history was brought to New York City to play on baseball’s biggest stage. At the dawn of the Roaring Twenties, Babe Ruth turned baseball on its head, sparking fan interest and excitement, and the birth of the most enduring dynasty in sports history. As one of the games most promising young pitchers, Babe Ruth had led the Boston Red Sox to World Series titles in 1915, 1916 and 1918. Ruth's pitching mark was 89-46 with the Sox, but his booming bat was too loud to be heard only every four days. Red Sox manager Ed Barrow, at the suggestion of outfielder Harry Hooper, began playing the Babe in the outfield in-between his starts. \n\nBy 1919, he played 130 games and was now an everyday player hitting home runs with unprecedented regularity. The long balls that flew from Babe Ruth’s bat also flew in the face of the games convention, changing its very nature with each successive clout. He seemed poised to lead the Red Sox to the top of the league for years to come. But, despite the Babe's obvious value as a slugger, he was dealt to the New York Yankees prior to the 1920 season, in a deal that would haunt Boston owner Harry Frazee forever. America was in a social revolution as the 1920’s began – Prohibition went into effect on January 16, just days after the announcement of Ruth’s sale to the Yankees – and baseball turned around as radically as the country did. The game changed more between 1917 and 1921 than it did in the next forty years. Despite the high-profile presence of such outstanding batters as Cobb, Wagner, Lajoie, Speaker, Jackson, and a few others, during the first two decades of the century hitting was a lesser art in a game that honored pitching and low scores. The term “inside” baseball was almost sacred, and John McGraw was its high priest. It meant playing for a run, a single run. Bunting, base-running, sacrificing were the core elements of baseball offense. All of this changed after Ruth’s breakthrough in 1919. It was not a gradual evolution but sudden and cataclysmic. Crushed by his sale to the Yankees, Ruth was uncertain of his future upon his arrival in New York City. But his doubts failed to affect his performance in 1920. During his first season in pinstripes Ruth clouted 54 homers, surpassing the combined totals of every other team in the majors except one. That same season, Ruth slugged an astonishing .847, a record that stood for more than 80 years. In 1920, the Yankees, coincidentally, became the first team to draw more than one million fans to a ballpark, more than double the attendance of any other club. In the media capitol of the world, the combination of Ruth’s boundless charisma and unmatched prowess on the diamond, elevated him to a level of popularity in his day greater than that of any public figure in American history.                       The Babe Meets Big Bill “My greatest desire is that no shadow of corruption, dishonesty or wrong-doing shall cloud any of the varied and multitudinous activities of the city government during my term of office.” – Chicago Mayor William Thompson in his Inaugural Address, April 26, 1915 William Hale Thompson, also known as 'Big Bill' Thompson, was one of Chicago's most interesting, colorful and eccentric mayors. He was known as the Builder Mayor, taking the mayoral oath of office a mere three short months before the city’s Eastland disaster. His corresponding actions and reactions immediately following the disaster and are a measurable and irrevocable part of Chicago history. Much like Babe Ruth, Big Bill was a larger-than-life demagogue. As a brilliant chameleon of a politician, he brought excitement and theatrics to the office and was renowned for his showmanship. Thompson once staged a "debate" between himself and two white rats, which he carried on stage to represent his political opponents. His speeches on many occasions provide a great insight into the period, the politics, and the mayor himself. However, in spite of many notable achievements throughout his three terms in office, Thompson’s tenure is characterized by controversy.\n\nChicago in the twenties was ruled by gangsters - first Johnny Torrio, and then his successor Al Capone. Mayor Thompson was suspected of being in the pocket of both. During Big Bill's reign as mayor, the police were ineffective in combating organized crime. Bribery and corruption were rampant. Thompson was reputed to allow the gangsters free rein over the city. His critics said he ignored crime, concentrating instead on his own issues - including more anti-British saber rattling, and threats to "punch King George in the snoot." Thompson’s memorable political career ended after losing the race for governor in 1936 and a fifth campaign for mayor in 1939. On March 19, 1944, he died at the Blackstone Hotel at the age of 76. At the time of his death, though never factually linked to the underworld figures he was presumed to be beholden, two safe deposit boxes in his name were discovered to contain nearly $1.5 million in cash. While in office, the flamboyant Thompson never missed an opportunity to attract attention, regularly rubbing elbows with members of Chicago’s high society. In 1920, when Thompson’s home town White Sox hosted the Yankees at Comiskey Park, a press opportunity presented itself that Big Bill could not resist. No spotlight shone brighter than that which followed Babe Ruth, the most popular and enigmatic baseball star in the world.  Thompson sought to meet the great slugger, knowing full well that such a meeting of moguls would be great fodder for the local media. A Gift For the Ages Accepting a gracious invitation on the part of the Mayor of Chicago, Ruth was escorted to the office of Big Bill after an afternoon game on September 17th, 1920, which saw the Yankees fall to the White Sox by the score of 6-4 at Comiskey Park. He arrived bearing a gift of his game bat. Prior to handing over his embattled club in front of ready cameras, Ruth inscribed the barrel, “To Mayor Thompson, From ‘Babe’ Ruth September 17th, 1920”. No finer present could a baseball fan receive. Immediately, a place of prominence was designated for it, so that all whom entered the Mayors office could see that considered among Big Bill’s friends was the greatest ballplayer in the world. Things began to sour for Thompson in 1923. In the midst of campaigning for a third consecutive term, he learned that he was being investigated for fraud by the State's Attorney. Upon learning of this investigation, Thompson withdrew from the mayoral race. Going out with a flourish, the former mayor announced that he was leaving to head an expedition to the South Seas to find tree-climbing fish. "I have strong reason to believe that there are fish that come out of the water, can live on land, will jump three feet to catch a grasshopper, and will actually climb trees" he proclaimed. Prior to leaving office, Thompson asked his longtime secretary, one of his most loyal employees, if there was a certain memento he’d like to have as a keepsake from their years of working together. Having admired the bat every day since it was delivered by Ruth himself, it was given to him as a symbol of gratitude from the former Mayor. Babe Ruth 1920 Game Bat Signed and Presented to Chicago Mayor William “Big Bill” Thompson This bat is offered here on behalf of the family of this former secretary of Mayor Thompson. It is a monumental revelation in the field of sports memorabilia. In the category of Babe Ruth game used bats it stands near the pinnacle.  Condition wise, the 35 ¾ inch, 42 ½ ounce relic has few peers.  The markings, finish, and overall quality of the Hillerich & Bradsby Co., “dash-dot-dash” model 125 are extraordinary. The usage wear is magnificent, indicating it was a favored weapon of Ruth’s. Furthermore, with provenance that is beyond reproach, it is one of a precious few legitimate Ruth game bats that bear his signature. An accompanying photograph of Ruth presenting the bat to the Mayor is detailed enough to show its grain pattern (a veritable “thumbprint” for bats). The addition of this “photomatch” elevates the status of this Ruth gamer into rarified company. It is a museum caliber treasure from Ruth’s pivotal first season as a Yankee, and arguably the most important of his storied career.  LOA’s: SCD Authentic (grade: A10* - Dave Bushing, Dan Knoll & Troy Kinunen), PSA/DNA (John Taube & Vince Malta), PSA/DNA (Steve Grad), Consignor Manufacturer Characteristics: Center Label: Louisville Slugger, Louisville, Ky. Label Description: Hillerich & Bradsby Co., 125 dash dot dash.  Trade Mark Reg. US Pat Off. Labeling Period: 1917-1921 (early Ruth signature model) Bat Weight: 42 ½ ounces Bat Length: 35 ¾ in. Finish: Standard Wood: Professional Grade Ash
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*Beachten Sie, dass der Preis nicht auf den aktuellen Wert umgerechnet wird, sondern sich auf den tatsächlichen Endpreis zum Zeitpunkt des Verkaufs des Objekts bezieht.


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