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  • Spielzeug & Sammlerobjekte

    3 283 Zum Verkauf

    163 141 Verkauft

  • 0—936 000 EUR
  • 22 Mär 1989—18 Jun 2017

CLARK GABLE

CLARK GABLE The gold plated brittania statue with the engraved front plaque, ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES FIRST AWARD 1934; between the base and the statue the engraved band CLARK GABLE. Under the base of the statue, the circular engraved plaque ACADEMY FIRST AWARD TO CLARK GABLE FOR HIS PERFORMANCE IN IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT--12 in. high; together with a black and white photograph of Mr. Gable holding his Academy Award the night he received it in Hollywood--10 x 8 in. Although Clark Gable will always be remembered for his portrayal of the dashing blockade runner "Rhett Butler" in Gone With The Wind, it would be for a role he did not want to accept that he would win Hollywood's highest Award. The actor starred as the just-fired reporter who chases runaway heiress Claudette Colbert across the country on a madcap journey. In classic "boy meets girl" style, Frank Capra's directing effort firmly established Columbia Studios as a major Hollywood studio. Considered one of the first screwball comedies of the Thirties, It Happened One Night made an overnight sensation of the thirty three year old Clark Gable, who was loaned out to Columbia from M.G.M. for the project. Louis B. Mayer thought so little of the film that he felt it "punishment" for the actor who had pleaded sick to Mayer before beginning his last film. It would be the only Academy Award that the "King Of Hollywood" would ever receive in his illustrious forty year career. The film is noted for several progressive moments, including the classic "Walls Of Jericho" scene where Gable and Colbert throw a throw a blanket over a rope to separate their motel room as they undress; the actor takes his shirt off to reveal that he is not wearing an undershirt. Reaction to the scene was so strong by the movie going public that sales of men's undergarments allegedly dropped 40.

  • USAUSA
  • 1996-12-15
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GEORGE HARRISON BEATLES OWNED AND PLAYED GUITAR

GEORGE HARRISON BEATLES OWNED AND PLAYED GUITAR 1966 - 1969 A 1964 Gibson SG Standard guitar, Serial No. 227666, translucent cherry finish, double cutaway solid body, Schaller machine heads, 22 fret fingerboard with mother-of-pearl inlays, Gibson logo inlayed to head, duel humbucker pickups, four rotary controls, selector switch, Gibson/Maestro Varitone wrap around tail piece and whammy bar, together with original hardshell case and six original Kluson tuners. Played by George Harrison from 1966 through 1969 during various Beatles appearances and recording sessions which include the last official United Kingdom concert at the NME Poll Winners Concert and during the Revolver recording session. It was also used by Harrison in two Beatles films used to promote "Paperback Writer" and "Rain" in 1966 and later played by John Lennon during the White Album sessions in 1969. Also present is a thirty-nine page custom binder which includes excellent documentation, featuring several reproduction images of Harrison playing the guitar with The Beatles as well as documentation from the book Beatles Gear: All the Fab Four's Instruments, from Stage to Studio (Andy Babiuk) and two letters verifying the guitar's authenticity. Together with additional related documents of the guitars subsequent owner, Pete Ham of Badfinger, to whom Harrison bestowed the guitar to in 1969. In 2002, the guitar was loaned to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland Ohio where it has been on display ever since.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-17

JOHN LENNON HANDWRITTEN LYRICS TO BEATLES' SONG 'NOWHERE MAN'

JOHN LENNON HANDWRITTEN LYRICS TO BEATLES' SONG 'NOWHERE MAN' 1965 A piece of paper with John Lennon's handwritten lyrics to the Beatles' song 'Nowhere Man.' Penned in black ballpoint ink, the manuscript reads in full: 1) He's a real Nowhere Man Sitting in his nowhere land Making all his nowhere plans for nobody Nowhere Man please listen You don't know what your [sic] missing Nowhere Man the world is at your command 2) Doesn't have a point of view Knows not where he's going to Isn't he a bit like you and me Nowhere Man don't worry Take your time don't hurry Leave it all till [sic] somebody else lends you a hand 3) He's as blind as he can be Just sees what he wants to see Nowhere Man can you see me at all? This is not a work-in-progress set of lyrics, rather it is the finished song that Lennon neatly wrote out and then used during the recording session at Abbey Road Studios in October 1965. 'Nowhere Man' is considered by many to be one of Lennon's most important songs lyrically as it represents a turning point in the evolution of The Beatles. It was their first song not directly dealing with romantic love and it opened the doors for the Beatles (as well as numerous other groups) to address more serious and poignant issues in pop songs. It is no surprise that Lennon composed this song alone; the subject matter of alienation and sadness is typical of many of his compositions. When asked about the song, he said it was about himself and that he was the 'Nowhere Man.' Although John Lennon seems like the antithesis of a 'Nowhere Man' now, knowing that he sometimes felt like this just adds another dimension to his already complex legend. 10 x 7 inches Please note the paper has been folded three times, has tea stains in the lower left-hand corner and has slight staining throughout, though the handwriting is not affected.

  • USAUSA
  • 2003-11-18

HERGE LE CRABE AUX PINCES D'OR

HERGE LE CRABE AUX PINCES D'OR Encre de Chine et mine de plomb pour la couverture de l'album ' Le Crabe aux Pinces d'Or ', publiée aux éditions Casterman en 1942 en version dite ' Grande Image ' et en 1943 pour l'album couleurs. L'album est encore édité de nos jours avec cette couverture. Pièce de musée. Format : 42 x 31 cm. Encadrée. Le Crabe aux Pinces d'Or est à plus d'un titre un album charnière dans l'œuvre d'Hergé. Tout d'abord, cet album voit l'apparition du Capitaine Haddock ; d'abord relégué à un rôle mineur, il s'affirmera comme le compagnon d'aventures le plus fidèle de Tintin et Milou. Seules 6 couvertures d'albums représentent ces 3 personnages de face. Les autres couvertures sont soit axées sur Tintin et Milou seuls ou représentent nos héros de dos, au mieux de profil. Le Crabe aux Pinces d'Or est par ailleurs le premier album à être réalisé dans un contexte de guerre et d'occupation, celui de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale et de l'occupation allemande. L'occupation de la Belgique contraint Hergé à abandonner les aventures de ' Tintin au pays de l'or noir '. La fin du journal ' Le Vingtième Siècle ' et de son supplément amène Hergé à rejoindre le journal d'occupation ' Le Soir-Jeunesse ' dans lequel il publiera à partir du 17 octobre 1940 ' Le Crabe aux pinces d'or '. Tout d'abord à raison d'une double page par semaine puis une demi-feuille pour finir par un strip quotidien de 4 cm sur 17 dans le Journal ' Le Soir ' à partir du 3 septembre 1941. Cette contrainte amènera Hergé à développer une nouvelle technique narrative afin d'entretenir un suspens à la fin de chaque strip et non à la fin de chaque double page comme c'était le cas pour les albums précédents. De par cette contrainte, cet album s'avère être l'un des plus denses, des plus riches, des plus efficaces et des plus rythmés. Le journal Le Soir publiant à 300 000 exemplaires, la visiblité des aventures de Tintin s'en trouve accrue. C'est à partir de la sortie de cet album que les ventes commenceront à décoller. Le succès éditorial ne se démentira pas par la suite. Cet album sera par ailleurs le dernier à paraître en noir et blanc.

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2009-03-14

Circa 1919-22 walter johnson washington senators road jersey

Walter Johnson: “The Big Train” Hailing from tiny Weiser, Idaho, 19 year old Walter Johnson was signed by the lackluster Washington Senators to shore up their pitching woes. The Senators needed a shot in the arm. After all, the American League team had losing records in each year since they joined the league in 1902. Initial expectations of the young man some called a country boy was mixed. On the one hand, team officials were overjoyed when they received news that Walter had pitched 75 scoreless innings in the Idaho State League without giving up a single run. On the other hand, one of their more cynical scouts thought that trying to tame the pitchers fast ball in the big leagues was like going on “a wild goose chase”. However, fate blessed not only the Capital City but anyone who loved the game of baseball when Walter came to the District of Columbia to hone his skill on the mound in 1907. Sure he spent each of his magnificent seasons with only one team, the Washington Senators, but he, in a sense, belonged to all. He became, simply, the number one baseball pitching star in a galaxy of stars with names revered a century later, names like Cy Young, Grover “Old Pete” Alexander and Christy Mathewson. By the time “The Big Train” finished his spectacular playing career, he had notched 416 victories backed by a generally weak hitting team with 110 of them by shutout, struck out over 3,500 batters and led his team to a Worlds Championship. The modest gentleman became an idol to millions nationwide. Walter Johnson, the greatest right handed pitcher of them all, was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1936, among the first class of men selected for baseball’s greatest honor. “Swat” In late 1922 Eric “Swat” Erickson retired to his farm in the small town of Jamestown, New York after concluding a solid seven-year career in Major League Baseball.  The crafty right-handed pitcher appeared in 145 games in the “bigs” winning 40 and losing 50 as a member of the New York Giants, Detroit Tigers and Washington Senators. When Erickson stepped out of the baseball limelight and settled back into the “country life” of farming and raising his family, he brought home to Jamestown memories and stories of having played with and against some of the greatest baseball players of the first quarter century. Among those recollections recorded in an interview by his hometown newspaper, in the 1970’s Erickson stated unequivocally ”Ruth was the greatest slugger of them all, don’t ever let anyone tell you any different, but Walter Johnson was the greatest pitcher.” Few could offer such an appraisal with better perspective. From 1919-1922 Eric Erickson and Walter Johnson had the privilege of each other’s company as friends and teammates with the Washington Senators. Erickson a solid contributor in his own right to the Senators pitching staff, witnessed Johnson at the height of his greatness from a vantage unlike any other. Their time together with the Senators coincided with the twilight of Johnson’s reign as the games dominant hurler. In Johnson, Erickson bore witness to a living legend. The impression was lasting.  In addition to the memories from which countless tales would be spun, Erickson carried home with him to Jamestown in 1922 other career mementos, which he tucked away in the farmhouse he had built himself by hand. The modest accumulation included typical objects such as photographs, programs, articles, pins and ticket stubs. One other item made its way back to the farm from Washington – an item that today stands as one of the games greatest treasures. For Erickson, in spite of having worn many different jerseys throughout his professional baseball career, carried home with him a single jersey, and it was not his own. “A Washington Monument” After more than 80 years of preservation by Eric “Swat” Erickson and his heirs, we are privileged to present the only known game worn Walter Johnson jersey in private hands. Manufactured by Spalding, the grey pinstriped road jersey is constructed of thick flannel. Underneath the manufacturers tag in the collar in Johnson’s last name in finely scripted red stitching. A heavily embroidered “W” adorns each of the three-quarter length sleeves in black. The present state appears to have changed little since it was last worn by Walter. Every aspect of the jersey is unchanged, including all six original buttons. Its condition is superb, with substantial, but not excessive wear that gives it ideal display quality. Outside of the only other known Walter Johnson jersey that resides in the National Baseball Hall of Fame, this is the finest object ever discovered related to “The Big Train” and it is a national monument to baseball greatness. Articles of provenance include: A notarized letter of provenance form Eric Erickson’s granddaughter. Copies of original newspaper articles related to Erickson and Johnson. Copies of photographs of Erickson and Johnson, including two of them together (shown). A comprehensive LOA from Dave Grob, Dave Bushing and Troy Kinunen of MEARS (Grade A10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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"Shoeless" Joe Jackson 1917-21 Signature Model "Black Betsy" Game Bat - Only Known Career Contemporary Example

"Shoeless" Joe Jackson 1917-21 Signature Model "Black Betsy" Game Bat - Only Known Career Contemporary Example, "Shoeless Joe" His name forever will be associated with the messiest episode in baseball history. His lifetime ban and exclusion from Hall of Fame consideration are viewed by many as a travesty of justice. But there's one thing nobody can take away from Shoeless Joe Jackson: his reputation as the greatest natural hitter in the game's long history. Ty Cobb thought he was. An impressed Babe Ruth copied his batting style. Other contemporaries, such as Tris Speaker, Nap Lajoie and Eddie Collins, marveled at the slashing line drives that whipped off his oversized bat that he affectionately dubbed "Black Betsy". During the 13 years (1908-20) he starred for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox, the lefthanded-hitting, righthanded-throwing left fielder never met a pitcher he couldn't hit. Jackson stood well back in the box, feet close together, and unleashed his big, even swing—unlike the short, punching jabs of other top dead-ball hitters. The only thing missing from the 6-1, 200-pounder's offensive arsenal was the great speed that gave Cobb the additional hits he needed to win 12 batting championships. Jackson, who topped the 200-hit plateau four times, batted .408 for the Indians in 1911—losing the batting title to Cobb's .420— and .395 the following year en route to a whopping .356 career mark, third all-time behind Cobb and Rogers Hornsby. Jackson, who earned his nickname as a minor leaguer when he played a game in his stocking feet because of a blister, helped the White Sox to a championship in 1917. But his exact role in the 1919 Black Sox scandal will never be known. There's no doubt the illiterate country kid from the Carolina hill country, perhaps caught up unwittingly in something he did not fully understand, enjoyed an outstanding World Series against Cincinnati (.375, a record 12 hits, no errors) while teammates were helping the Reds to victory. One of eight White Sox players banned for life by then-commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Jackson never played another big-league game—a punishment, right or wrong, that continued long after his 1951 death. "Betsy" After his expulsion from the majors, Jackson fell from grace in the eyes of some, but had become a folk hero to many. His nickname "Shoeless Joe", his infamy, and even the identity of his famous bat "Black Betsy" contributed to that folklore. Of the latter, no other player in sports history ever had a piece of equipment with its own identity of the magnitude of Joe Jackson's bat. The Joe Jackson professional model bat presented here is one of two known bats, and the only full name signature model, manufactured by Louisville Slugger Inc., that can be attributed to being used by Joe Jackson during his active Major League career. The other bat, a factory side written and vault marked J13 model (with Jackson's last name stamped in block letters on the barrel), was returned by Jackson to then J.F. Hillerich & Son Company, in June of 1911, so that more bats of the same model could be made. The specifications of this bat, including its 35.5 inch length and 39.2 ounces weight, are nearly identical to the referenced J13 model that is noted in factory records. This bats 1917-1921 labeling period coincides not only with some of Joe Jackson's most prolific offensive seasons, but also with the White Sox Championship season of 1917 and of course, the infamous 1919 campaign. The bat shows evidence of outstanding use with a substantial handle crack. Many ball marks are visible on the right, left and back barrel. Also visible on the bat are cleat marks and some fading to the finish on the front barrel. Judging by the appearance of the wood, some drying or grain swelling on a section of the barrel could have been reduced by buffing or rubbing with an improvement to the finish having been made in that area. The handle has been scored to enhance the grip. The bat has Jackson's familiar dark barrel and natural handle, which has been characterized as his "Black Betsy" finish. The discovery of this bat is believed to trace back to a large find made at the Louisville Slugger Kentucky headquarters in the mid 1980's. It was first sold publicly by Leland's as part of The Goldstein Collection in 1994, where it was purchased by Bill Nowlin. We are privileged to offer it here as one of the most historically significant game used baseball bats in existence. LOA from John Taube of PSA/DNA (Graded GU7).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24

GONE WITH THE WIND

GONE WITH THE WIND Clark Gable's personal script for Gone With The Wind, 1939. The cover of the maroon leather bound script is embossed GONE WITH THE WIND SCREEN PLAY and CLARK GABLE, on the inside cover, the actor's personal bookplate; the text pages bound with eight black and white stills from the film featuring the actor as "Rhett Butler" with Vivien Leigh as "Scarlett O'Hara". Inscribed and signed by producer David Selznick on the first page of the script: For Clark, Who made the dream of fifty million Americans (who couldn't be - and weren't - wrong!), and one producer come true! With gratitude for a superb performance and a happy association, David Xmas, 1939 By the late 1930s millions had read a sensational book by Atlanta author Margaret Mitchell. "Gone With The Wind" was an overnight success, selling millions of copies and immortalizing it's characters. Selznick International Pictures was overwhelmed from the start with letters from the public suggesting casting possiblities for it's beloved Scarlett and Rhett. While everyone wanted Clark Gable as the dashing leading man, there was only one problem; Gable did not want to play Rhett Butler. He was quoted as saying, "It wasn't that I didn't appreciate the compliment the public was paying me, it was simply that Rhett was too big an order. I didn't want any part of him, Rhett was too much for any actor to tackle in his right mind." Since he was signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, who did not want its' star making money for anyone else, Gable felt safe that he could avoid taking on the role. Fate had a different idea when David Selznick and M.G.M. Studio head Louis B. Mayer made one of the most infamous deals in Hollywood history. For the services of Clark Gable and a cash investment of over one million dollars, M.G.M. would receive the distribution rights and one half of the profits for Gone With The Wind. In August 1938 Gable signed on; "I could have put up a fight," the actor said, "I didn't." As they say, the rest is history.

  • USAUSA
  • 1996-12-15
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CITIZEN KANE

CITIZEN KANE Dateline -- New York City, 1941. "Citizen Kane is far and away the most surprising film and cinematically exciting motion picture to be seen here ... As a matter of fact, it comes close to being the most sensational film ever made in Hollywood." Bosley Crowther 'New York Times'. "Staggering and belongs at once among the great screen achievements." New York 'World Telegram'. "Not since Chaplin's A Woman in Paris, has an American film struck an art and an industry with comparable force" Archer Winston, 'New York Post'. CITIZEN KANE Gold plated metal statue on black base with front plaque inscribed "Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences First Award 1941" and plaque on opposite side inscribed "Academy First Award to Herman J. Mankiewicz for Writing Original Screenplay of Citizen Kane". Statue is a substantial 7.5 lbs, lightly patinated and bears the inscription 'G. Stanley". Citizen Kane tells the story of an American icon and begins simply enough, with a man's death, and a news reel obituary, in which he is alternately vilified for being a communist, a fascist, a vulgar man of the people, a robber baron and a number of other contradictory stereotypes. When a reporter finds the story intellectually unrevealing, he sets out to penetrate the enigma of the great man. A team is assembled to find people who were close to Kane. And so begins a perplexing journey of discovery to uncover the nature of the enigma known as Charles Foster Kane and, by extension, of America itself. It was not, strictly speaking, a commercial success. It was densely detailed and structurally unfamiliar for the audiences of the day, more used to stories with a straight line of advance. But more to the point, it was the object of a smear campaign directed by the man it was popularly thought to portray. William Randolph Hearst, marshaled all the considerable resources of his media empire to do his utmost to undermine and destroy the film. Those theaters that showed the picture did so at their peril, and were denied advertising in the pages of Hearst newspapers. In one particularly obscene gesture, Louis B. Meyer offered to pay RKO the full amount of its investment in the picture, if it would destroy the negative before the film could be released. The picture so many tried so hard to destroy is viewed differently today. The American Film Institute has ranked Citizen Kane as the greatest American film of all time -- this in a field where Selznick's Gone With the Wind is ranked number four behind Kane, Casablanca and The Godfather. Citizen Kane was different from any movie made previously in the United States. It was a radical departure and in a sense, an awakening of what film was capable, and incapable of achieving under the studio system. The actors were virtual unknowns, indeed, totally inexperienced in the movie business having been veterans of Welles' New York theatre company. Greg Toland was hired for his revolutionary lighting techniques and his brilliance behind the lens, many of which he manufactured himself from his own designs as they did not yet exist commercially. And, finally, for his most important acquisition, Herman J. Mankiewicz who would in seclusion in the desert town of Victorville, California conceive and write his most brilliant and subversive work -- American. Herman Mankiewicz *(1897-1953) began his career as a reporter for the New York Tribune, and after serving in the marines during WWI, worked in Paris and Berlin, eventually finding his way back to New York where he wrote for the New York Times, and later became the first drama critic for The New Yorker. In 1926 he moved to Hollywood, and over the next quarter century wrote or co-wrote nearly 50 films. Although he was often uncredited, he had a hand in some very good pictures, including Horsefeathers, Duck Soup, The Wizard of Oz, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Dinner at Eight and others. But his supreme achievement was American, later retitled Citizen Kane for which, perversely enough, he was still almost dealt out of the credits. It may also worth mentioning that the year after he took the Oscar for Kane, he was again nominated for Best Screenplay for Pride of the Yankees. Propelled by American, Citizen Kane forever changed the character of American cinema. Sound, cinematography, direction, casting were all approached in new ways. And although nominated by the Academy for Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Score, and Best Screenplay, it won only the latter. The award was shared with Welles, largely because his RKO contract had required that he act, produce, direct and write the film. But it was Mankiewicz whose original conception culminated in the magnificent script for which recognition -- despite all the hostility, distrust and animosity of the Hollywood and Hearst forces -- could not be denied. And was Hearst's aversion justified? Was Charles Foster Kane really William Randoph Hearst? It can be said that Mankiewicz, a brilliant man and serious student of American history, had chaffed in his part as a bit player in a system which treated the writer as a necessary if contemptible evil. He knew Hearst and of his film mogul pretensions. He had been to San Simeon. He was, in fact, a frequent dinner guest at the castle, and usually sat at Hearst's right hand at the grand table. Where Kane's story departed from Hearst's, Hearst saw misrepresentation; where it paralleled his own, he saw insult, ingratitude and invasion of privacy. Who knows what Mankiewicz saw, but it's clear how he felt. In many respects he represented a whole generation of disenfranchised, and neglected writers. He had here got his revenge, and provided Welles his magnum opus. Welles himself had written about how Mankiewicz felt in these words: "The big studio system often made writers feel like second-class citizens a lot of them were pretty bitter and miserable. And nobody was more miserable, more bitter, and funnier than Mank ... a perfect monument to self-destruction." Kane undoubtedly was a product of both minds. Yet Rita Alexander, who typed the original script and had custody of all the drafts through shooting, has said that Orson Welles did not write "one single word." Richard Corliss of 'Time' writes, "The obvious answer to the dilemma is that Herman Mankiewicz wrote the film, and Orson Welles directed it." In the end, both men had made history. And how does Citizen Kane truly stand the test of time, and where is it really in the pantheon of American cinema, and popular culture? David Thomson, the respected film historian and author of highly acclaimed books on Welles and Selznick both, writes in his 1996 biography Rosebud, that "[Citizen Kane is] the greatest movie that ever has been or will be made, the work that sums up the entire medium and holds it in reserve for those prepared to look and consider the ultimate destruction of the thing called cinema." For this, the most important American film ever made, there exists but two gold statues. Of the two, the one belonging to the Mankiewicz heirs is offered here, while Welles' award is the subject of litigation between the Estate and those currently holding it in their possession. Rosebud? What is the central enigma that is Kane, which at heart is beyond a simple and ubiquitous case of lost innocence? "The structure is very intricate; the dialogue is brilliant; the overall view of America and its functioning is ironic; and the mood is pessimistic - not just in wondering whether this man was happy or fulfilled but in its suspicion that meaning itself, and human purpose, is a vain hope. The script's role and originality can never be denied, for Kane is nearly the only movie to suspect that power, wealth, prowess and ambition are forlorn engines, the noise of which tries to hide silence and emptiness." David Thomson -- "Rosebud" Citizen Kane Citizen Kane Citizen Kane Citizen Kane

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-11-18

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Joe DiMaggio's 1936 New York Yankees Rookie Home Uniform

Joe DiMaggio's 1936 New York Yankees Rookie Home Uniform, "I'm just a ballplayer with one ambition, and that is to give all I've got to help my ball club win. I've never played any other way." Joe DiMaggio From 1936-1951, less three years in the service during Word War II, Joe DiMaggio gave his all to the New York Yankees, helping them win 9 World Championships. Joe began his pro career with the San Francisco Seals in 1933, where, as an eighteen-year old rookie, he set a Pacific Coast League record by hitting safely in 61 consecutive games, a portent of his future success. "Baseball didn't really get into my blood until I knocked off that hitting streak," DiMaggio said. "Getting a daily hit became more important to me than eating, drinking or sleeping. Overnight I became a personality." After the 1934 season, the Yankees bought DiMaggio for a reported $25,000 and five players. They kept Joe in San Francisco for another year of seasoning, where, in 1935, he starred with a .398 average, 34 homers and 154 RBI. 1936 While DiMaggio was tearing up the PCL, the Yankees were struggling to recapture their championship identity. In the spring of 1936, they were a team that in the past seven years had won only one pennant and World Series. They had played the 1935 season without Babe Ruth who, after being insulted by Jacob Ruppert's $1 offer, left to play briefly for the Boston Braves before retiring for good. While Lou Gehrig continued his quiet excellence and George Selkirk picked up a bit of the Bambino's slack with 94 RBI's, in 1935 the Yankees once again finished second to the World Champion Detroit Tigers, led by their quartet of slugging Hall of Famers, Cochrane, Greenberg, Goslin and Gehringer. Could the San Franciscan rookie lead the Yankees back to the World Series? The anticipation that surrounded DiMaggio's debut with the Yankees was without precedent. The frenzy, perpetuated among fans, team officials, and especially the media, was heightened by an unexpected delay as a result of a foot injury that kept DiMaggio sidelined for the first few weeks. While the star rookie mended what one New York paper dubbed "The Most Famous Hot-Foot in Yankee History" the Yankee Box office got hundred of letters asking: When would DiMaggio play? The papers covered his medical exams, his every appearance at the ballpark, even satirically speculating on the new layers of skin on his foot. The New York Times ran a lively exchange of letters from readers arguing out the pronunciation of "Dee-Mah-Jee-O". The Yanks were playing well, but not well enough: after eighteen games, at eleven and seven, they were just where they'd finished the last three years-second place. Finally the papers trumpeted the glad news: the kid would play on Sunday, May 3 against the St. Louis Browns. A crowd of more than twenty -five thousand (by far the largest since Opening Day) braved cool and showery weather to cheer the debut. "An astonishing portion of the crowd," said the New York Post "was composed of strangers to sport-mostly Italians- who did not even know the stadium subway station." Perhaps it was these fans who rose to their feet along with the rest, whose cheers were heard above all others when young Joe, wearing number 9, made his first plate appearance-with Yankee runners on first and third. Even as Joe grounded a tame "fielder's choice" to third, the electricity of the moment was sustained. Later, in the sixth, Joe got a hold of a pitch from "Chief" Elon Hogsett and drove it, as the Post remarked, "like a cannon shot between the center and left fielders," and DiMaggio had his first big-league triple. The game as a whole was never in doubt: the Browns' pitching was awful; but who cared? The daily news ran DiMaggio headlines three inches high, but in the lead tried to keep matters in perspective: "This is the story of Joseph DiMaggio, a kid from San Francisco, though it might be proper to mention that the Yankees beat St Louis 14-5, at the stadium yesterday." From the moment DiMaggio first put on his pinstripes, he made the Yankees "his" team. By late May, Joe was leading the league with a .411 average, and the Yankees were streaking. On the last day of May, they won their fifth straight, to sweep the Red Sox (whom they now led by four and a half games), when DiMaggio singled in the seventh to tie, and tripled in the twelfth to win the game. Almost forty-two thousand fans, including Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, left Yankee Stadium to tell of the rookie's glory. Young Joe had to leave the ballpark in a phalanx of cops, to protect him from adoring fans. It was seldom mentioned all year that Gehrig was having an AL MVP season, that Dickey was pounding the ball flat: or that the whole Yankee offense was producing runs at the rate of the mighty '27 Yanks. The story was painted in bold black and white: The Yanks, resurgent, were racing toward a pennant. And the reason for the resurgence was Joe. DiMaggio and the Yanks were the story everywhere in the country. Writers in every AL town used the coming of the rookie wonder to build attendance for their local clubs. In the month before the All-Star Game, the AP baseball feature named the rookie DiMaggio seven times (Dizzy Dean, with four mentions, ranked a distant second.) Little wonder, in the count of two million ballots from fans in forty-eight states and Canada, Joe led the voting for the 1936 AL All-Star outfield. And in case anyone had missed the story, in its July 13th issue, Time Magazine took the occasion of the All-Star Game to look in on baseball- and on the cover there appeared a full length photo of DiMaggio, swinging ferociously in his rookie pinstripes. The 1936 Yankees won the pennant by a whopping 19 ½ games over the Tigers, largely due to Joe's .323 average, 29 HRs, and 125 RBI and league leading 22 assists. Had there been a Rookie of the Year Award in 1936 it would have been Joe's. In the 1936 Series match up with the cross town Giants, Joe added the exclamation point on his extraordinary rookie campaign, hitting .346 in the six game series, helping secure a World Series title for the Yankees, the first of four consecutive championships. His rookie year of 1936 was the first of many spectacular seasons for DiMaggio, in a career that would include a litany of feats and eight more World Series rings. When DiMaggio retired in 1951, he had a lifetime average of .325. He won two home-run crowns (1937 and 1948) on his way to 361. DiMaggio hit over .300 eleven times and won two batting titles - .381 in 1939 and .352 in 1940. In 1941, he hit in 56 consecutive games, a record to this day. He knocked in more than 100 runs nine times, leading the American League with 125 in 1941 and 155 in 1948 and finishing second with 167 in 1937. He won three Most Valuable Player Awards (1939, 1941 and 1947). But for DiMaggio himself, 1936 would forever remain his most dear season in baseball. His fond reflections of 1936 later in his life are well documented. Those who knew him best have recalled that a picture of the 1936 Yankees team was among the few baseball-related photographs that hung in his home. And of all the rings, hardware, and other honors bestowed upon one of baseball's most highly decorated players, it was his 1936 World Series ring he cherished above all others, worn with pride until it was removed from his finger on the day he died. Charles "Smoke" Mason Growing up in the Ozarks area of southwest Missouri, Mason's live arm earned him the nickname "Smoke" and took him to the University of Missouri. After his final season there in 1938, he was approached by Yankees scout Bill Essick. Signed in May of 1938 for $1,300, including $1,200 to pay off school debt and $100 for his pocket, Mason boarded a bus to Joplin, Missouri to play for the Yankees' Joplin Miners farm team. When he arrived in Joplin, Mason met the equipment manager, who chose a work out uniform for Mason from a mound of used uniforms that had been sent down from New York by the big league club as a cost saving measure. In a decision that took but a moment of thought, with consideration given only to size and shape, Charles Mason was handed what, unbeknownst to him, would someday be looked upon as a national heirloom. Mason worked out in his designated uniform only for a few weeks before the Joplin season began and he donned the official Miners team uniform. He kept the pinstriped "workout uniform" in his locker throughout the 1938 season, with little use for it then and virtually no sense of its significance. It stayed with him through a second season with Joplin in 1939, during which he experienced the one and only encounter of his life with Joe DiMaggio in person. During spring training in Kansas City, Florida, DiMaggio, taking a break from preparing for his fourth big league campaign, paid a visit to the aspiring Yankee prospects. Mason recalled that he was seated in the dugout along with five other players when the Yankee Clipper strolled by, pausing to greet them casually. According to Mason he simply said, "Hello fellas", but the impact was lasting. The impression left by DiMaggio, whose legend was rooted, but far from fruition at that time, abolished Mason's obliviousness to the old uniform, which bore this man's name in red stitching. At seasons end, Mason asked Mr. Becker if he could keep it. Becker said "Well, what the heck are you going to do with it, Charles?" Charles said, "I need a uniform to wear when I go back to Willow Springs. We play a lot of ball down there in the hills." Years later, Mason would reflect that his being allowed to keep the uniform was not customary; attributing Mr. Becker's exception to his feeling that he had a good prospect on his hands in "Smoke" Mason.  Upon his return to Willow Springs in 1939, baseball became secondary in Mason's life. His father took ill, passing away shortly thereafter, and the uniform was relegated to a closet at his parent's house. The next drastic turn in his life came with World War II when Mason went to serve in Panama. After the war, he met and married Frances Cochran in 1950. The forgotten uniform lay dormant until sometime in the 1950's when Frances discovered it in the corner of the closet, while helping clean out his mother's house. Its fate resting in her hands, she opted to save what another might have deemed disposable.     Number Nine Manufactured by Spalding, the uniform, consisting of a jersey and pants is one of only two home pinstriped uniforms issued to Joe DiMaggio for the 1936 season (He was also issued two road uniforms, one of which resides in the Hall of Fame). Tagged exclusively for DiMaggio, the uniform features red chain stitching in the collar that reads "Joe DiMaggio 9", while similar chain stitching in the pants reads, "Joe DiMaggio 9, 36" referencing the player, uniform number, and year of issue. DiMaggio was only assigned the uniform number 9 for his rookie season, after which he would don number 5 for the remainder of his career. It is important to note that in 1936, uniform numbers were issued based on a player's appearance in the batting order (ie: Gehrig's number 4 denoting his position in the clean-up spot). For incoming rookies who had not established such a position within the order, numbers were assigned in ascension based on their status as a prospect. DiMaggio was so highly touted that he was issued number 9, the lowest number available to a rookie. Every technical aspect of this uniform is as it was when Joe DiMaggio made his Yankees debut with the exception of the sleeves having been cut and the customary removal of the "NY" logo from the front of the jersey, which was done upon its designation for minor league service. No other lettering was ever applied to the front, and the "NY" outline is still clearly visible on the left breast. The jersey and pants retain superb visual appeal, demonstrating substantial, but not excessive usage wear.  Team repairs appear on the pants and a few rust spots on the uniform have been cleaned. In addition to the jersey's documented lineage, it is supported by no less than half a dozen "photo matches". Every Yankee pinstriped flannel garment of this era is as unique as a snowflake because each jersey and pants were hand stitched, so the pinstripe patterns vary from uniform. The alignment of the pinstripes on both the pants and jersey (most readily apparent at the seams of the shoulders, collar, number, and 'NY' outline) and pants (waistband, belt loops, inseam) provide exact matches to several photos of DiMaggio from 1936, many of which are presented here. Among the most compelling photo matches is an image catalogued by Corbis as being taken during the 1936 World Series (shown), providing clear evidence that this jersey was worn by Joe during his first appearance in the Fall Classic. LOA from MEARS.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Fine and Important Märklin "Lusitania" Ocean Liner

Fine and Important Märklin "Lusitania" Ocean Liner Germany, circa 1912 , The first class passenger's acronym for the most desirable cabins, P.O.S.H. (Portside Out, Starboard Home) has become synonymous with sumptuous luxury. This is an apt description for the "Lusitania," one of Märklin's most important ocean liners crafted at the height of their creative genius. The deck, finished in faux wood planking, is fitted with a host of elegant and intricate details including working anchors and chain, tall foremast fitted with searchlight and crow's nest set just before a multi-tiered superstructure. This is fitted with a bridge with stairs and an observation post, four top quality funnels and over two dozen ventilators of various shapes and sizes, a walkway incorporating a cabin and domed panel skylight, and ship's wheel controlling the rudder bearing the Märklin logo. The hull is handsomely finished in white with portholes over a blue lower deck with portholes over copper red over brick red at keel and two hinged gates on railing with gangway secured below. Marked "Lusitania" in gold at bow on either side. There is a view of the lower deck made possible by small cutouts in the hull on both sides. This adds to the toy's realism on one hand while stirring the imagination on the other. Electric (dry cell) motor housed in hull. In the case of the "Lusitania" what is often said about wine is true of the toy's finish. Age has improved it. Its gentle fading and crazing add to its appeal and enforces the feeling that it is a regal survivor of a long ago era.   Length: 37 ½ inches

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-12-17

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Circa 1931 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Home Jersey

Circa 1931 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Home Jersey, Lou Gehrig will forever be lost in the glare of New York Yankees teammate Babe Ruth's vast spotlight. But nothing about Gehrig's accomplishments should be minimized, from the 2,130 consecutive games he once played as the “Iron Horse” to his longtime link with Ruth as the enforcer of baseball's most prolific slugging duo. Gehrig was a rock-solid 6-foot, 210-pound left-handed slasher who rocketed line drives to all sections of the park, unlike the towering, majestic home runs that endeared Ruth to adoring fans. And unlike the gregarious Ruth, Gehrig was withdrawn, modest and unassuming, happy to let his teammate drink the fruits of their tandem celebrity. But those who played with and against Gehrig understood the power he could exert over a game. As the Yankees' first baseman, cleanup hitter and lineup protection for Ruth, Gehrig was an RBI machine. He won four American League titles and tied for another and his 184-RBI explosion in 1931 is a still-standing A.L. record. His 13 consecutive 100-RBI seasons—he averaged an incredible 147 from 1926-38--were a byproduct of 493 career home runs and a not-so-modest .340 average. It's hard to overstate the havoc wreaked by Gehrig's bat. He topped 400 total bases in five seasons, topped 150 RBIs seven times, hit a record 23 grand slams, won a 1934 Triple Crown, hit four homers in one 1932 game and cranked out a World Series average of .361 with 10 homers and 34 RBIs. In 1927, when Ruth hit his record 60 home runs, Gehrig batted .373 with 47 homers and 175 RBIs winning the MVP award. The Ruth-Gehrig relationship powered the Yankees to three World Series championships, and when Ruth left New York after the 1934 season, Gehrig and young Joe DiMaggio powered the team to three more. But Gehrig is best remembered for the iron-man streak that lasted from 1925-39, when Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis— now known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, ended his career prematurely and tugged at the heart strings of a nation. Gehrig, finally accorded the recognition that long had eluded him, died two years later. This is one of only a handful of known examples of a Lou Gehrig game used Yankees home pinstriped jersey. Based on a thorough inspection of jersey’s own physical traits as well as documented photographs of Gehrig wearing what appears to be an identical jersey, we have identified its era of usage to the 1931 season. In a career full of great seasons, 1931 was a watershed for Gehrig. He batted .341 and led the league with 184 RBIs setting a still-standing single season record. During the 1931 season, Ruth and Gehrig combined for 92 home runs and 347 runs batted in, the most ever by a pair of teammates. The Yankees, as a team, averaged more than seven runs a game. Gehrig, having never won a home run title, finally notched a league leading total of 46 in 1931. However, Gehrig had to share the title with Ruth who matched his output of 46. In April of that season an event occurred that can be viewed as a capsulization of Gehrig’s subordination to Ruth. With Lyn Lary on base, Lou Gehrig hit a home run into the stands at Washington. The ball, however, bounced back on the field and Lary saw a Washington outfielder catch it for what he believed was the last out of the inning. Gehrig circled the bases, but was called out when he "passed" Lary on the basepath as Lary headed for the dugout. Instead of a home run, Gehrig was credited with a triple, costing him the single home run he needed to claim sole ownership of the home run title at seasons end. Manufactured by Spalding, this jersey is tagged exclusively for Gehrig featuring red chain stitching in the collar that reads “L. Gehrig.” Every technical aspect of the body of this uniform is as it was when last in the custody of Gehrig with a few exceptions. All of the seams and tagging are original and unaltered. Gehrig’s own customization of cutting the sleeves can be validated by the photograph presented in the catalogue. Appropriately, there is no evidence of an “NY” logo ever having appeared on the front since this feature was not instituted on Yankees uniforms until 1936. Post-Gehrig alterations to the jersey include the removal of the felt portion of Gehrig’s number 4 on the back, although remnants of black stitching still reveal the outline of the numeral. Secondly, the outline of lettering that appears to be “STANTON” appears faintly on the front of the jersey indicating its one time designation for service in a minor league. The jersey shows signs of extensive use and wear including general and consistent soiling throughout the jersey. Significant fabric stress/damage appears in the upper back portion of the jersey as well as in the front shoulders with a 1/2”  hole on the left shoulder and fabric tears on the left. Most of these damaged areas have been professionally restored and reinforced in some cases by the addition of supportive fabric applied to the interior.  There are a few areas of red staining/fabric bleed in the lower 1/3 portion of the jersey. The second button from the top has been replaced, but this appears to be a vintage repair. In spite of these technical imperfections the jersey retains excellent visual appeal. In the pantheon of sports memorabilia a jersey worn by Lou Gehrig has few peers. Columnist Jim Murray called Gehrig "Gibraltar in cleats" and sportswriter John Kieran said of him, "His greatest record doesn't show in the book. It was the absolute reliability of Henry Louis Gehrig. He could be counted upon. He was there every day at the ballpark bending his back and ready to break his neck to win for his side. He was there day after day and year after year. He never sulked or whined or went into a pot or a huff". Gehrig was the same in baseball as he was when he faced a fatal disease that struck him in the prime of his life. Ruth may have been rightfully dubbed “The Sultan of Swat” or the “The Colossus of Clout” among other things, but Gehrig’s acclaim as “The Pride of The Yankees” has never been disputed. LOA from MEARS.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05

Babe ruth’s 1938 brooklyn dodgers full uniform

In 1933, with Ruth aging and Gehrig slumping, the Yankees fell to second place. By this time the Babe seldom played an entire game, often being removed for defensive reasons in the late innings. His playing career clearly winding down, Ruth set his heart firmly on becoming the manager of the Yankees. After making his wishes known, they suggested he manage their Class AAA club in Newark to get some experience. With injured pride he refused.  After the 1934 season Ruth, somewhat sulking with an uncertain future, led a group of Americans on a tour of Japan. Upon his return, Ruth, the greatest star the game has ever known, was presented with a contract offer for $1 dollar by the franchise he had almost single-handedly built into a dynasty. The Yankees offer was a mere formality, enabling Ruth to refuse, and thus retire on his own recognizance. In 1935 the Braves came forward and offered Ruth what they described as a three-level position: player, assistant manager, and vice president. The last two were a sham. Boston was only trying to beef up their attendance by using the aging legend as a gate attraction. In spite of his rapidly diminishing skills, Ruth showed one last glimpse of his former greatness. On May 25, 1935, in Pittsburgh, Ruth homered in his first two trips to the plate, singled in his third appearance, and in the seventh inning hit a ball over the right field roof of Forbes Field. It was his final major league home run, and it was, typically, a monster shot. He played in only a handful of games after that for the Braves. The closest Babe Ruth ever came to realizing his managerial dream came three years later when he returned to New York as a coach with the Dodgers in 1938. Ruth’s hope was renewed briefly, as he proudly donned this Brooklyn uniform, hoping to parlay the position into something bigger. During his first and only return to Major League baseball after his official retirement in 1935, Ruth was a tremendous drawing card for the talent starved Dodgers, and the Brooklyn front office made sure he kept very high profile. Not only was Ruth appointed first base coach, (where the fans would be sure to see him throughout the entire game), but he was also ordered to take pre-game batting practice with the club so the fans could once again witness the “Sultan of Swat” hitting a few balls out of the park. In spite of the “side show” atmosphere, Ruth clung to hope. But when the club’s managerial post opened the next year Leo Durocher got it, and Ruth wasn’t rehired. He hung up his Brooklyn Dodgers uniform after one season. This would be the last baseball uniform he would ever wear as a professional. Ruth spent the next ten years of his life waiting for the call to become a manager, but it never came. Ruth’s last major league uniform, from his lone season with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1938, consists of his jersey, pants, and socks. The heavy white flannel Spalding jersey and pants each feature Ruth’s name in red chain stitch. Other significant features include the 1939 World’s Fair patch on the left sleeve of the jersey, and custom lacing affixed to the tail allowing Ruth to keep it neatly tucked into his pants. The royal blue matching socks are stitched with separate numbers “14” and “26”, differing from Ruth’s uniform number 35. Consistent wear is evident throughout, and many characteristics of the uniform can be matched to accompanying vintage photos of Ruth wearing it. It remains in its original state, unaltered since the day removed it for the last time, thus ending the greatest career in sports history. LOA: SCD Authentic (A 9.5).

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10

Casey Stengel’s 1951 New York Yankees World Series Ring

Casey Stengel's 1951 New York Yankees World Series Ring, Nineteen fifty-one will forever stand as a definitive year in the history of the New York Yankees franchise. Not only does it represent the hub of the Yankees record run of five consecutive titles, but it also signifies the lone convergence of three of the team's most iconic figures. Casey Stengel, whose tenure with the Yankees would prove to be the most successful in team history, had managed DiMaggio for two seasons since Casey took the helm after the departure of Bucky Harris in 1948. They had won the World Series twice together in two tries. However, by 1951, the great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. His retirement was also hastened by bone spurs in his heel. The 1951 season would be the curtain call of the "Yankee Clipper". However, it also marked the arrival of the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, who bore the weight of unbridled expectations to fill the gap in centerfield. Word had spread that this young phenom’s monumental power and blazing speed might actually make him a viable replacement to the irreplaceable Joe DiMaggio as the "new" Yankee idol. So convinced of this were the Yankees that they assigned their young prodigy uniform number "6," the next in a sequence that included Ruth (#3), Gehrig (#4), and Joltin' Joe (#5). Though some referred to 1951 as a season of change for the Yankees, the end result was more of the same, another championship title. The Yankees dispatched their cross-town rival New York Giants in 6 games, ending their Cinderella season ("The Giants Win The Pennant!"). It was a sweet ending for some and a new beginning for others; Game 6 marked the final Major League game for DiMaggio, who was headed for retirement at age thirty-six, while Mantle would appear in eleven more World Series. The Yankees were now 14-4 in World Series appearances and 1951 marked the solidification of the second coming of a baseball dynasty. This is Casey's own 14k gold 1951 Yankees Championship ring, remaining in virtually the same condition as when he received it. A shimmering .30-carat diamond rests in the center of the ring's face. The manufacturer's stamping "Dieges & Clust" and his name "Charles D. Stengel" appear inside the size 10 band. Classic design elements include the proclamation "New York Yankees World Champions" encompassing the face, and the year "1951" on both sides above the Yankees top hat logo. Casey's ultimate prize ranks among the most important World Series rings ever offered for sale publicly. LOA from the Stengel family.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05

Unverkauft

Circa 1933 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Road Jersey

Circa 1933 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Road Jersey, Lou Gehrig will forever be cast in the glare of New York Yankees teammate Babe Ruth's vast spotlight. But nothing about Gehrig's accomplishments should be minimized, from the 2,130 consecutive games he once played as the "Iron Horse" to his longtime link with Ruth as the enforcer of baseball's most prolific slugging duo. Gehrig was a rock-solid 6-foot, 210-pound left-handed slasher who rocketed line drives to all sections of the park, unlike the towering, majestic home runs that endeared Ruth to adoring fans. And unlike the gregarious Ruth, Gehrig was withdrawn, modest and unassuming, happy to let his teammate drink the fruits of their tandem celebrity. But those who played with and against Gehrig understood the power he could exert over a game. As the Yankees' first baseman, cleanup hitter and lineup protection for Ruth, Gehrig was an RBI machine. He won four American League titles and tied for another and his 184-RBI explosion in 1931 is a still-standing A.L. record. His 13 consecutive 100-RBI seasons (he averaged an incredible 147 from 1926-38) were a byproduct of 493 career home runs and a not-so-modest .340 average. It's hard to overstate the havoc wreaked by Gehrig's bat. He topped 400 total bases in five seasons, topped 150 RBIs seven times, hit a record 23 grand slams, won a 1934 Triple Crown, hit four homers in one 1932 game and cranked out a World Series average of .361 with 10 homers and 34 RBIs. In 1927, when Ruth hit his record 60 home runs, Gehrig batted .373 with 47 homers and 175 RBIs winning the MVP award. The Ruth-Gehrig relationship powered the Yankees to three World Series championships, and when Ruth left New York after the 1934 season, Gehrig and young Joe DiMaggio powered the team to three more. But Gehrig is best remembered for the iron-man streak that lasted from 1925-39, when Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis' now known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, ended his career prematurely and tugged at the heart strings of a nation. Gehrig, finally accorded the recognition that long had eluded him, died two years later. The style of this road grey Yankees flannel jersey dates it to the pivotal 1933-34 period, when Ruth was in his final seasons in New York and the torch of Yankee greatness was being passed into a single hand. Manufactured by Spalding, this jersey is tagged exclusively for Gehrig featuring red chain stitching in the collar that reads "L. Gehrig." A "Spalding" manufacturer's tag resides to the right. Every technical aspect of the of this jersey appears as it was when last in the custody of Gehrig with the exception of the letters "YO" of "New York" on the front and Gehrig's number "4" on the back having been expertly restored. Each sleeve has been trimmed of approximately two inches of length, a customization attributed to Gehrig, and supported by numerous photographs from the era. Several small holes on the front and back have been patched on the interior with vintage material. The jersey shows signs of usage wear to an awe-inspiring degree, yet retains outstanding display quality and a sense of timelessness. In the pantheon of sports memorabilia a jersey worn by Lou Gehrig has few peers. Columnist Jim Murray called Gehrig "Gibraltar in cleats" and sportswriter John Kieran said of him, "His greatest record doesn't show in the book. It was the absolute reliability of Henry Louis Gehrig. He could be counted upon. He was there every day at the ballpark bending his back and ready to break his neck to win for his side. He was there day after day and year after year. He never sulked or whined or went into a pot or a huff". Gehrig was the same in baseball as he was when he faced a fatal disease that struck him in the prime of his life. Ruth may have been rightfully dubbed "The Sultan of Swat" or the "The Colossus of Clout" among other things, but Gehrig's acclaim as "The Pride of The Yankees" has never been disputed. LOA from Richard Russek/Andy Imperato.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24

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Henry “hank” aaron 1954 milwaukee braves rookie road jersey

Henry Louis Aaron, born in 1934, grew up as one of eight children in Mobile, Alabama. As a youngster he worked hauling 25 pound blocks of ice, building strength in his wrists that would serve him well when he became a professional ball player. Like many resourceful children without money and material things, he did what he could do to hone his skills, including swatting bottle caps with a broomstick for hour on end. Though Hank never played for his high school baseball team (they did not have one), he participated in sandlot contests where he could, and by age 16 was good enough to join a semi pro club, the Mobile Black Bears. A year later in 1951, the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro Leagues signed Hank.  They put him at shortstop though they were sure he could play anywhere and signed him for $200 a month. Henry’s major league break came a year later when the Boston Braves signed him in 1952 and sent him to Eau Clair Wisconsin of the Northwest League. He hit an impressive .336 and was named to the Leagues All Star team as well as its Rookie of the Year. A year later, he was one of a trio of African Americans to break the color line in the South Atlantic “Sally” League. Racial animosity was constant on road trips through the South, but the baseball diamond proved to be Hank’s refuge from a sometime distressing life.  The game was his personal tonic and Hank led the circuit with a .362 batting average with 125 RBI and 115 runs scored. In 1954, fate pointed its finger Hank’s way when Bobby Thompson, the Braves starting left fielder broke his ankle. Even the gracious Thompson years later said “Magic is the only way to describe it” when recalling his raw 20 year old replacement. Hank’s Braves debut took place not in Boston, but in Milwaukee where the team had recently moved. For that 1954 season alone Aaron was assigned jersey number 5, which would later be changed to the number 44 he is most readily identified with. Hank’s .280 average, 13 homers and 69 RBI in 122 games in ’54 were impressive for any rookie, but for Aaron it was just an adjustment period. Soon, as history tells us, Hank became as formidable as any hitter in baseball, frustrating even the games most experienced pitchers. “Throwing a fastball past Henry Aaron is like tying to sneak the sun past a rooster”, said the St. Louis Cardinals fireballer Curt Simmons, speaking on behalf of shell shocked pitchers throughout the National League. Sheer ability, consistency and resilience were the earmarks of Aaron’s prolific career. For 20 consecutive seasons he totaled more than 20 home runs; 15 times topping the 30 homer mark, and eight times he walloped 40 or more home runs. As Aaron biographer Lonnie Wheeler wrote, "(Hank) Aaron's excellence was not expelled in blinding bursts of energy, but rather played out, patiently and inexorably, over a whole generation." It is from 1954, Hank’s rookie year that we offer one of the finest game used jerseys ever presented at auction. Manufactured by Wilson, the size 40, zip-front flannel survives in outstanding original condition, with solid evidence of game use. Tagging on the front tail includes Aaron’s name and year “’54” chain stitched on a felt backing. Among its superb design features are the team name and tomahawk logo embroidered on the front, and the colorful Braves patch on the left sleeve. Aaron’s number “44” adorns the front and back, which was changed by the team from his original 5 at the end of the 1954 season. A portion of the outline of the original number “5” is faintly visible behind the “44” on both sides of the jersey. As was common in this era, Aaron likely donned this jersey for spring training the following season in 1955, and perhaps a portion of that regular season as well. Aaron’s vintage signature and “Best Wishes” salutation appear on the left side of the front. LOAs from MEARS (Grade A9), PSA/DNA and JSA. NOTE: A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this jersey are being donated by consignor Steve Myland to the Big Brothers and Sisters of America, an organization for which both Mr. Myland and Hank Aaron have been longtime supporters through time and personal resources.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24

Babe Ruth 1921-31 Louisville Slugger Professional Model Bat (Graded A10, GU10)

Babe Ruth 1921-31 Louisville Slugger Professional Model Bat (Graded A10, GU10), Babe Ruth played baseball like he lived life: with loud, gaudy, entertaining gusto. There was nothing subtle about the happy-go-lucky Sultan of Swat, who paraded through his career, forged an enduring relationship with adoring fans and then withstood the test of time as the greatest power hitter in baseball history. Ruth's legendary home run totals-714 in his career, 60 in 1927—are no longer records, but they still stand as milestone numbers by which all power hitters are judged. His legendary carousing still enhances the irascible image that colors his aura. More than anything, the magnetic Ruth is hailed as the savior of the game, the man who ushered in the longball era and revitalized baseball when it was mired in the bog of the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Ruth became a New York icon as he powered his way through the Roaring '20s and the Great Depression, posting shocking homer totals of 59 (1921), 60 (1927) and 54 (1928) while leading the Yankees to four World Series championships and anchoring one of the most devastating lineups in history. Lost in the fog of Ruth's 12 American League home run titles, 13 slugging championships, four 50-homer seasons and six RBI titles was a career .342 average that still ranks 10th all time. No single sports memorabilia item consistently inspires more awe than a bat used by Babe Ruth. For veteran hobbyists or casual fans, the allure of a bat wielded by Ruth in his prime, the ultimate tool of his trade, is unfailing. For many reasons this example is among the finest of known Ruth gamers. The first and most identifiable feature of this George "Babe" Ruth professional model bat is its rich, dark “Hornsby” finish, so described because it was a preferred finish on bats used by fellow batting legend Rogers Hornsby. Its usage characteristics are ideal. Manufactured during 1921-31 period, the uncracked 35 1/4", 40 oz. club shows many ball marks visible throughout the barrel. A close examination of the handle indicates there was once three rings of tape, of which the 'ghosts' are still visible. Available photos show Ruth holding a bat with similar tape present. All barrel brands are deeply burned with no visible flaws. Enhancing the considerable physical qualities of the bat is its spectacular provenance. This Ruth game used bat is accompanied by a letter from former Brooklyn Dodger, Tony Cuccinello, who was given the bat by the Babe when he was a coach for the Boston Braves in 1936. Cuccinello's letter of authenticity is dated November 21, 1981. We must note there are two typos in Cuccinello's letter, both of which are innocent in nature and in no way alter the spirit of the letter. In his letter Cuccinello mistakenly refers to Ruth being coach with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1936, as opposed to the correct year of 1938. Also, he erroneously refers to the 1938 Boston Bees as the "Braves." In a third party assessment conducted by both SCD Authentic (precursor to MEARS) and John Taube of PSA/DNA, it earned their highest marks of “A10” and “GU10” respectively. Its physical attributes notwithstanding, rarely do game bats of this importance include player provenance of this magnitude. A remarkable gift from the Babe to Tony. LOAs from David Bushing and Troy Kinunen of SCD Authentic (Grade A10), and John Taube and Vince Malta of PSA/DNA (Grade GU10) and Tony Cuccinello.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05

1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Card Complete Set of (176) In Original Cracker Jack Album

1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Card Complete Set of (176) In Original Cracker Jack Album, The Gill Collection - 1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Cards As an eleven year-old in Kingston, Ontario, Canada in 1914, young Ernie Gill pulled his first few Cracker Jack cards out of boxes of his favorite caramel coated popcorn treat. As with many young boys of the period who nurtured both a sweet tooth and love of baseball, he was captivated. The next year, inspired by the offer printed on the back of each card, he scraped together the requisite 25 cents to mail away for the entire 1915 set of Cracker Jack baseball cards and the additional 10 cents for the "Handsome Album" to keep them in. A keen collector, he carefully recorded the name and card number of each player in the album beneath their card. The set stayed with Ernie through several moves through the years, including his first move from Kingston to a boarding house in Toronto in the early 1920s. After graduating from Queen's University in Kingston, a gold medalist in mathematics, Ernest moved to Toronto to work for the Canada Life Assurance Company and to write his actuarial exams. He eventually became CEO and Chairman of the Board of Canada Life. In his spare time, he maintained his boyhood interest in baseball, playing the same position of catcher for Canada Life in the insurance league in Toronto that he had for the local Kingston area league teams of his youth. In the late 1980s, Ernie's cards came to light again with his final move and were subsequently passed down first to his daughter, Mary Byers, and then to his grandson, Christopher Byers, in whose care they have remained until being offered here publicly for the first time. The Cracker Jack baseball card series of 1914 and 1915 are the most popular caramel cards ever produced. Accurate player depictions replicated from photographic images set against a brilliant red background is the hallmark of the series. Their timeless design and ideal player selection has made the issue a favorite among collectors since the earliest beginnings of the hobby of card collecting. In 1914, cards from the series could only be obtained as inserted "surprises", one per every box of Cracker Jack. As a result, most of the Cracker Jack cards retrieved from boxes were already affected by some degree of staining even prior to being subjected to handling by sticky fingered children. The same one per box distribution method was employed in 1915, however, the newly established redemption offer for a complete set, gave ambitious kids like Ernie Gill the opportunity to get a complete series of 176 pristine cards that never had to be subjected to contact with the caramel coated product. This complete set of (176) 1915 Cracker Jack Baseball cards appears in predominantly the same uncirculated condition in which it was received and placed in its paper album by Ernie Gill in 1915. The whiteness of the white borders and redness of the red backgrounds are as vibrant as if time stood still. Typical of the issue, centering varies somewhat throughout, but is better than average overall. It is important to note, that the album was designed to secure the cards on its pages through paper corner mounts (tabs) and no adhesives have been utilized. The cards were inserted in two different ways, one way in which the corners of a card were slid behind the tabs, showing the corner tips. The other way was to insert the cards over the corner tabs, hiding the corner tips. In many cases, mostly when the corners were slid behind the tabs, faint marks and even line impressions appear on the cards. A more complete technical description of this set is available online. It is our pleasure to offer this heirloom on behalf of the family of the late Ernest Clark Gill (1903-1992).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24

The extremely rare and important 'Gardiner' Märklin American-market Gauge V (120mm.) spirit-fired Steam Passenger Train, circa 1906

The extremely rare and important 'Gardiner' Märklin American-market Gauge V (120mm.) spirit-fired Steam Passenger Train, circa 1906 Comprising: 4025 'Mignon' Locomotive and six-wheel Tender 41A 1st and 3rd Class Corridor Car 42A 1st Class Dining Car with Verandah 44A Smoking Car with Luggage Compartment Track and Points Details: Locomotive and Tender Paintwork details: The locomotive hand-painted throughout in black with gold banding to boiler, side footboards, borders to cab sheets, windows and roof, smoke box saddle and horizontal dome straps, generally with straw lining above and red lining below, cab interior in terracotta and boiler frames and wheels in red, with black edging to driving wheel spokes. The tender with gold painted rivets, some also embossed, gold banding to tender base, horizontal banding under top flaring, side and rear sheets with juxtaposed wide and thin straw lining, the frames with red edging and silver details and wheels in red. Mechanical Details: The brass locomotive boiler with brazed and crimped end plates, domed fire box, single fire tube to chimney, transverse water tubes and 'U'-bend hot-steam boiler feed to cylinders. Fitted with safety-valve filler, pressure gauge, sight glass (glass missing) and fittings for cab-floor mounted feed-water pump (missing). Body of heavy gauge sheet steel. Chassis fitted with twin double-acting cylinders, each with two piston valves and pivoted rocker arms, reverse activated from cab or track through centrally-mounted steam reverse block. Cylinders, cylinder-lubricators, guides and motion all in nickel-plated brass, with cast iron locomotive wheels. The tender body of heavy gauge tinplate, with water tank and feed pipe and cast iron wheels and frames. --Locomotive and tender 52in. (132cm.) long overall (Locomotive structure generally sound, cab roof slightly dished, probablty from use a ride-on train. Paintwork original, surface rusting and paint loss to frames and some horizontal surfaces, fair to good on cab sheets, roof, lower half of boiler and domes. Lining still visible on corroded surfaces. Lacks cowcatcher (pilot), front bogie, vaporising spirit lamp, bell, whistle, sight-glass and feed-water pump. Boiler tubing repaired. Tender with paintwork dry-flaking and corrosion, rust to interior and water tank. Part of tender body coming loose from frames). Coaches: 41A bogie clerestorey 1st and 3rd Class Corridor Car Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in tuscan red panels including upper sides, doors and ends, all lined in gold and lower side panels bordered in black, the inset window frames with vermilion red edging. The roof, with five vents, painted in shades of tan brown with clerestorey sides in tuscan red, with ten hand-painted skylight panels edged in vermilion red. The coach side frame-boards and cast iron bogie side-frames in vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside with wall surfaces in light blue, the pressed tinplate button-back seats textured in bottle green, surmounted by ornate luggage racks, coat and hat hooks and ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The wash-room with lavatory, wash basin, tap and ledge, in ivory, simulated wood and gold. The windows with simulated curtains in shades of green painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (Paint flaking, some corrosion and paint loss, minor damage, some paint loss to interior and curtains, lacks two footsteps, one coupling, two vents and light bracket, sides and part of ends split at solder-join along base, one door window cracked) 42A bogie clerestorey 1st Class Dining Car with Verandah Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in light brown, with simulated match-board sides shaded in mid-brown and tangerine, with horizontal bands continuing across doors and over coach ends, with door panels and upper coach sides lined in straw, the inset window frames in brown, edged in vermilion red. The roof, with five roof vents, painted in shades of tan brown, with clerestorey sides in light brown, with ten painted skylight panels edged in vermilion red. The coach frame-boards in dark brown and cast iron bogie side-frames in vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside, with wall panels in light lime yellow, the pressed tinplate button-back seats textured in dark red with gilded ornamental finials, table tops in marbled white with ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The kitchen compartment fitted with cooking range with hinged lid, dresser, wash basin, tap, towel rail and etched glass sliding service hatch to dining area. The windows with simulated curtains in shades of green painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (General paint loss and surface corrosion, interior paint flaking and fragile paint loss to simulated curtains, lacks verandah structure, couplings and two vent tops, crease damage to one door, one side split from base, set of steps damaged and loose) 44A bogie clerestorey Smoking Car with Baggage Compartment Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in shades of green, with ivory lining on lower panels and simulated fielded rectangular panels on lower baggage compartment sides, doors and ends, the inset window frames in dark green edged in vermilion red, surrounded by ivory lining. The roof, with five vents, painted in shades of tan brown, with clerestorey sides in green, with ten painted skylight panels edged in vermilion. The coach side frame-boards in ivory-edged dark green, with the cast iron bogie side frames vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside, with wall surfaces in yellow ochre, furnished with individual tinplate wicker seats in tuscan red with green textured seats, two green textured sofas and ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The baggage compartment fitted with two sets of double doors, wall desk, pigeon holes, table and lamp bracket. The coach windows with simulated curtains, the baggage compartment with blinds, all in shades of light green and ivory painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (Some corrosion and wear to paint, some crease damage to baggage end door, clerestorey section rusty, some corrosion to interior and paint loss to floor, some splitting of solder joint to lower coach sides at base, minor damage, three door window glasses, two frames and one coupling missing) Overall length of train --12ft.1in. (369cm.) Track and Points (Gauge V - 4 3/4in./120mm. rail centre to rail centre, 4 5/8in./11.75cm. inside rails) Sturdy fabricated steel flat-bottom 'T'-section rail made to special order. Painted in grey, with outside flat-section fish-plates with bolt holes for each connection, five sleepers per rail, riveted through rail bottom. Points fitted with hinged blade sections, activated by lever mounted on solid elongated sleeper. With detachable lever-operated track ramp to engage locomotive track reverse mechanism. Thirty-six straight sections --each 39 1/2in. (100cm.) long Twenty-five curved sections --each 42in. (107cm.) long Two left-hand points --each 42in. (107cm.) long Two right-hand points --each 42in. (107cm.) long Total length of track, including points --220ft. (67m.) (Considerable paint loss and some rusting, some bending to fishplates)

  • GBRGroßbritannien
  • 2001-12-17

CECIL BEATON TRYPTICH PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE

CECIL BEATON TRYPTICH PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE A 1956 photograph of Marilyn Monroe Miller taken by society photographer Cecil Beaton. In one of her most famous sittings, the actress is posed reclining, holding a rose. The photograph is signed on the mat Cecil Beaton and is accompanied by two page autograph letter signed from Beaton. He describes his fascination and perspective on his subject in detail, "Miss Marilyn Monroe calls to mind the bouquet of a fireworks display, eliciting from her awed spectators an open mouthed chorus of ohs and ahs... In her presence, you are startled, then disarmed, by her lack of inhibition. What might at first seem llike exhibitionism is yet counterbalanced by a wistful incertitude beneath the surface. If this star is an abandoned sprite, she touchingly looks to her audience for approval. She is strikingly like an overexcited child asked downstairs after tea. The initial shyness over, excitement has now gotten the better of her. She romps, she squeals with delight, she leaps onto the sofa. She puts a flower stem in her mouth, puffing on a daisy as though it were a cigarette. It is an artless, impromptu, high spirited, infectiously gay performance. It may end in tears. Equally impromptu is her general appearance. This canary blond nymph has been so sufficiently endowed by nature as to pay no attention to the way she looks. Her hair, her nails, her make-up, have a makeshift, spontaneous attractiveness. It is all very contemporary: Marilyn Monroe conjures up two straws in a single soda, juke-boxes, sheer nylons and drive- in movies for necking (does she not project a hynotized nymphomania?). This, then, is the wonder of the age - a dreaming somnabular, a composite of Alice in Wonderland, Trilby, or a Minsky artist. Perhaps she was born the post war day we had need of her. Certainly she has no knowledge of the past. Like Giraudoux's Ondine, she is only fifteen years old; and she will never die." Cecil Beaton, June 1956. Encased in a silver tryptich, engraved on the center panel To Marilyn Monroe Miller Love Nedda and Joshua Logan. Gelatine silver print. 1956. Signed "Cecil Beaton" in red pencil on the mount.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-10-27

* Bitte beachten Sie, dass der Preis sich nur auf den tatsächlichen erzielten Endpreis zum Zeitpunkt des Verkaufs bezieht.

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