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The iconic original Robby the Robot suit and Jeep from Forbidden Planet

The iconic original Robby the Robot suit and Jeep from Forbidden Planet Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1956. Original Robby the Robot suit consisting of three main interlocking sections: His intricate "head," the upper torso with bellows-jointed arms, and the legs; constructed of Royalite plastic, metal, rubber, wood, acetate, and Perspex, with a 1950s pair of men's size 10.5B black leather loafers located inside Robby's feet; with Robby's original Jeep, control panel, alternate original "claw" hands, alternate original "Uncle Simon" The Twilight Zone head, and original wooden shipping "stage crates" with original painted studio transmittal information and shipping labels. Originally created for M-G-M's outer space epic Forbidden Planet, Robby the Robot ranks among the single most iconic props in science fiction film history and arguably is the cinema's most famous and instantly recognizable robot. Bonhams is proud to present Robby, his Jeep, and his other major components at auction for the very first time. Forbidden Planet finds the crew of the spaceship C-57D (led by Leslie Nielsen) discovering a scientist, Morbius (Walter Pidgeon), his daughter Altaira (Anne Francis), and Morbius' robotic servant, Robby, on the distant planet Altair-4. In the (literally) electrifying climax, the astronauts are confronted by the horrible "Id" creature that wiped out the extinct Krell species who once populated Altair-4. Robby was built at M-G-M for around $100,000--a gigantic sum for a science fiction prop in those days. Designed by Robert Kinoshita, Arnold Gillespie, Irving Block, Mentor Huebner, and Arthur Lonergan, Robby was a quantum leap in futuristic movie robot design, breaking from earlier clunky "tin-can" mechanical man designs. His "sax valves," "gyroscopes," and other marvelous trappings are a pinnacle of 1950s futurism. Robby's comical, winning personality also marked a major shift in movie robots. All of Robby's parts were created in M-G-M's prop shop, primarily the leather shop because of its advanced tooling capabilities. Royalite plastic was used for his head, feet, and upper and lower torso. All of the spheres on Robby (arm gimbals, legs, and dome) were made of Lumarith (acetate). Metal, rubber, wood, and Perspex were also used in Robby's construction. Resistors on either side of Robby's front neon tubes blink, giving him the appearance of talking. Robby ran on five 12 volt DC motors, which were originally World War II military surplus. Robby was also sometimes powered by a cable run from his remote control panel on wheels (included here) to his heel. The cable is visible in Forbidden Planet when Robby enters Morbius' house and says "Something is approaching from the west. . ." Actor/stuntman Frankie Carpenter and former child star Frankie Darro alternately wore the Robby suit in the film. The bulky suit weighs approximately 120 pounds, which Carpenter or Darro had to shoulder using a "flying harness," akin to the ones worn by the Flying Monkeys in The Wizard of Oz (1939), made of metal with back padding and leather padded shoulder straps. The tiring task of playing Robby necessitated a rack for them to rest in between takes. (A similar rack, which was used during production of the film The Invisible Boy (1957) is included here; it also appears onscreen briefly in The Invisible Boy. It is uncertain whether or not it was used on Forbidden Planet.) Robby's huge Jeep was built on a Crosley car body; its futuristic adornments are mainly painted wood. The Jeep does not run because M-G-M cannibalized its steering mechanism and motor for another production. Forbidden Planet was a colossal hit, and Robby figured heavily in its ad campaign. (The film's one sheet poster gave the false impression that the benign robot is a monster.) Since Robby was in many ways the film's "star," he was present at the film's Los Angeles premiere at Grauman's Chinese Theater. During the film's original release, Robby was shipped around the country on a promotional tour; his original wooden shipping "stage crates" are part of this lot. Like many of Forbidden Planet's elaborate props and costumes, Robby was reused frequently; he "starred" in The Invisible Boy (1957) and appeared in many TV series, including Lost in Space, The Addams Family, and The Twilight Zone. An alternate, simpler Robby head was used on the suit for its appearance in the The Twilight Zone episode, "Uncle Simon," and it is present here. In 1970, Robby and his Jeep were purchased privately from M-G-M by Jim Brucker and both were displayed throughout the 1970s at Movie World/Cars of the Stars. By 1979, Robby had fallen somewhat into disrepair; filmmaker and collector Bill Malone, who had previously built the first full Robby replica, acquired him that year. Using original spare parts included with Robby, Malone restored him to his full glory. (Robby's current hands are recasts from his original hands; the originals were rubber and naturally deteriorated over time. The "bubble" dome on Robby's head is not an original but was made from an original M-G-M studio mold. An original Robby dome is included which has yellowed with age.) After Robby's restoration, he occasionally cameoed in films like Gremlins (1984) and periodically made public appearances at conventions, screenings, and other events, including the 2016 Turner Classic Movies Film Festival. He has been replicated countless times as toys, model kits, and other memorabilia. Robby was also recently honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in a special retrospective of Forbidden Planet; he remained on display at the Academy for two months. The original Robby is fully operational, has been carefully maintained for nearly four decades, and is as stunning as ever. Robby: 29 x 38 x 71 in. [with arms forward]; Jeep: 52 x 60 x 72 in.; claws: 3.75 x 13.5 in.; alternate head: height: 26.5 in.; diameter: 22.5 in.; flying harness: height: 12 in.; diameter: 17 in.; control panel: 17 x 23.75 x 39 in.; stage cases: 38 x 40 x 61 in.; smaller "Robot Head" case: 30 x 30.5 x 30 in.; rack: approximately 24.5 x 31.75 x 43.5 in.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-11-22

The iconic lead statuette of the Maltese Falcon from the 1941 film of the same name

The iconic lead statuette of the Maltese Falcon from the 1941 film of the same name Warner Bros., 1941. Cast lead with dark patina, figure of a falcon on a pedestal with smooth breast feathers, almond eyes, and rounded tail feathers. With Warner Bros. prop department inventory number "WB 90067" to rear tail feathers and underside. Some scratches to head and chest, lower right tail feather visibly bent. A copy of the DVD of the film and a reproduction still accompany this lot. Dimensions: 12 in. h. x 4 1/2 in. d. x 5 in. w. Weight: approx. 45 lbs. One of two known cast lead statuettes created for use in John Huston's screen version of The Maltese Falcon, the "bent tail feather" bird, and THE ONLY STATUETTE CONFIRMED BY WARNER BROS. ARCHIVES AS HAVING APPEARED ON SCREEN. Humphrey Bogart plays San Francisco detective Sam Spade in John Huston's directorial debut. Spade tangles with three nefarious characters played by Mary Astor, Sidney Greenstreet, and Peter Lorre, all of whom are chasing a statuette they believe to be a gold and jewel-encrusted figure of a falcon, but which ultimately is revealed to be made of lead. The WB 90067 falcon was purchased privately by the present owner in the 1980s, and has been in his collection or on exhibition at the Warner Bros. Museum and other prominent institutions since that time (see full exhibition history below). Accompanying the falcon is correspondence from Warner Bros. Archivist Leith Adams confirming that WB 90067 is seen on screen in the classic 1941 film, and that the present owner is the rightful owner of the piece. Additional statuettes made of other materials1 have come to market in the past two decades, but only the lead statuettes bear the smooth breast feathers, almond eyes and rounded tail feathers that match the falcon seen on screen during the credits and in Sam Spade's apartment. Additionally, at least three publicity department memos of the period written by Robert S. Taplinger, Warner Bros. Director of Publicity (today part of the Warner Bros. Archive housed at USC; copies are available for review), state that the falcon used on screen was made of lead or metal. Furthermore, one of the film stills showing Greenstreet, Astor and Lorre examining the bird on the table in Spade's apartment shows that the blotter paper on the table has ripped under the weight of the bird as it is turned, suggesting that only one of the lead versions can have been used. The second lead falcon with a consecutive Warner Bros. inventory number (WB90066) to its rear tail feathers and underside sold at auction in 1994, and is identical to the present lot except for the damaged right tail feather. The bent tail feather of our bird, however, sets it above even its twin. One of the Taplinger memos mentions a significant incident during filming of the finale: actress Lee Patrick (as Spade's secretary Effie, the woman who delivers the falcon to his apartment) dropped the statuette while handing it over to Bogart. Bogart pushed Patrick out of the way of the falling bird, but in so doing his own foot caught the brunt of the falcon's weight, causing him to injure two toenails. The right tail feather of the falcon was reportedly damaged in the fall, and the damage is visible2 as Sam carries the bird out of his apartment at the end of the film (see next page for detail). Given the exact visual match to the film, the extensive archival evidence, and the long exhibition history of WB 90067, its authenticity is beyond reproach. Long celebrated as one of the greatest pieces of movie memorabilia of all time, its appearance at auction marks a major event. This rare bird with the bent tail feather truly is—to quote Sam Spade in the final moments of the film—"the stuff that dreams are made of." Selected exhibition history: France, Paris 1991-1992: Homage a la Warner Bros. exhibit at Centre Georges Pompidou, October 16, 1991 to March 5, 1992 United States, New York City 1992-1993: Warner Brothers: Behind the Shield at the Museum of Modern Art, June 4, 1992 to March 1, 1993 j Germany, Berlin 1995: Kino - Movie – Cinema: 100 Jahre Film at Stiftung Deutsche Kinemathek, April 7 to July 2, 1995 United States, Burbank, CA 1996-2013: continuously on exhibition loan to Warner Bros. Studio Museum since its opening in 1996 United States, San Francisco, CA August 1, 1997: United States Postal Service release of Humphrey Bogart postage stamp United States, Los Angeles, CA 2004: Turner Classic Movies' In the Picture, An Exhibition at The Grove, October 4 to December 31, 2004 United States, Los Angeles April 11, 2013: Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences opening of fund drive for new Museum on the LA County Museum campus Publication history Adams, Leith. "From the Archives ... The Maltese Falcon." In WB Highlight (July/August 1996). "The Dream Factory, Reborn." Fortune Magazine (February 16, 1998), p. 106. Broadcast history: The History Channel, "Stones, Bones and Missing Links," 1990 The History Channel, "History, Lost and Found," 1999 "The Oprah Winfrey Show," June 10, 1997 "The Connie Chung Show," c.2002 Turner Classic Movies, "What Dreams Are Made Of," October-November 2013 Turner Classic Movies, November 19, 2013 Estimate: refer to department.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-26

The piano from Casablanca on which Sam plays "As Time Goes By"

The piano from Casablanca on which Sam plays "As Time Goes By" Warner Bros., 1942. A "studio" 58-key piano on wheels, with wood and plasticine keys, likely manufactured by Kohler & Campbell, 1927, serial # 252636, with label of Richardson's of Los Angeles to interior case, and with "FNP" (for First National Pictures, which merged with Warner Bros. in 1927) marking to rear of piano. With original stool. Lid of piano hinged at center as is usual with uprights, but also entirely detached from upper case and instead secured with hook and eye (altered for the production of Casablanca so that Rick can open the piano lid from the rear and hide the transit papers). One-inch notch to center left piano leg (visible onscreen) and three small holes to piano lid (also visible onscreen). Petrified chewing gum wad stuck to underside of keyboard with faint impression of a fingerprint visible under magnification. Moroccan paint restoration executed in the early 1980s under the direction of Warner Bros. studio. Together with a signed photograph of Dooley Wilson as Sam at the piano and a copy of the film. 39 x 41 x 22 in. Sam's piano is central to both the plot and the overall mood of Casablanca. Many of the major plot machinations take place on or near the piano, and Sam's tasteful melodies frame every scene in Rick's. We hear the strains of "It Had to Be You" as we first enter Rick's Café Américain, following the camera past Sam (Dooley Wilson) leading the big band, and then focusing on the variously desperate European refugees who haunt the cafe. It's Rick's place, but Sam is the star attraction (earning 10% of the profits, we later learn), and his music dominates the room. Moments after the oily Ugarte (Peter Lorre) gives Rick (Humphrey Bogart) the transit papers to hold, Sam leads the cafe in a boisterous rendition of the novelty tune, "Knock on Wood." In the middle of this performance, Rick casually walks up to the piano, opens the lid from the rear and slides the stolen transit papers inside. About 12 minutes later, Victor (Paul Henreid) and Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) walk into Rick's, and Sam again is at the piano, this time playing a solo tune; he falters just a bit as he catches sight of Ilsa. Moments later, Ilsa approaches him and asks him to play "As Time Goes By." He does so, stopping only when Rick comes storming out to say, "Sam, I thought I told you never to play that song...." Sam does play the song a few scenes later, at Rick's behest ("Play it!" Rick snarls, not "Play it again, Sam," as is often thought) as Rick drowns his sorrows ("Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into mine!"), and remembers his brief, passionate affair with Ilsa in Paris. The piano also plays a role in the greater tension between occupier and occupied: late in the film, when Sam and the band are on break, a group of German soldiers commandeer the piano and sing and play "Wacht am Rhein" loudly. In a bold move, Victor Laszlo crosses to the band and demands that they play the French anthem "La Marseillaise," and soon the band, the refugees and the staff have drowned out the Germans with their patriotic song. The history of the piano: This piano and another were pulled from the Warner Bros. prop room for the film (our piano still has the "FNP" marking on the verso). George James Hopkins, the set decorator on this and many other Warner Bros. films, checked out a book from the Warner Bros. reference library, La decoration Marocaine (Paris: 1925) by Joseph de La Nézière to help him design the look of the film. Inspired by the patterns and colors illustrated in this book, Hopkins created the elaborate Moroccan designs that grace the piano. (The owner confirmed this information via a personal interview with Hopkins in the early 1980s.) What sets this piano apart from the other--aside from the fact that ours appears throughout the film, rather than in a single flashback--is that the lid has been altered to accommodate a pivotal plot point. Even in the stage version, Everybody Comes to Rick's, the piano was always the hiding point for Ugarte's transit papers. In the film, however, the writers come up with the clever "misdirect" of having Rick hide them in plain sight of the entire room by depositing the papers quickly under the lid of the upright as Sam plays. The only way this works, however, is if the lid opens from the rear: otherwise Rick would have to reach over Sam's shoulder to hide the papers, a hardly subtle move. The solution to this staging problem was to have the prop department completely remove the top of the piano, leaving the piece secured by a hook and eye only. The other piano from Casablanca, which appears onscreen briefly in the Parisian flashback sequence, sold most recently at auction in 2012. The present piano, Sam's piano, has never sold at auction before, though it does have a long exhibition and publication history (see below). Selected exhibition history: France, Paris 1991-1992: Homage a la Warner Bros. exhibit at Centre Georges Pompidou, October 16, 1991 to March 5, 1992 United States, New York City 1992-1993: Warner Brothers: Behind the Shield at the Museum of Modern Art, June 4, 1992 to March 1, 1993 Germany, Berlin 1995: Kino - Movie – Cinema: 100 Jahre Film at Stiftung Deutsche Kinemathek, April 7 to July 2, 1995 United States, Burbank, CA 1996-2013: continuously on exhibition loan to Warner Bros. Studio Museum since its opening in 1996 United States, Los Angeles, CA 2004: Turner Classic Movies' In the Picture, An Exhibition at The Grove, October 4 to December 31, 2004 United States, Los Angeles, CA 2006: Celebrating Max Steiner at the Hollywood Bowl United States, Los Angeles April 11, 2013: Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences opening of fund drive for new Museum on the LA County Museum campus Publication history: Webb, Michael, ed. Hollywood: Legend and Reality. (Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Catalog.) Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1986, pp 125, 148, 149 Rose, Frank. The Dream Factories Reborn. Fortune Vol 173, no. 3 (February 16, 1998), pp. 107-115. Harmetz, Aljean. The Making of Casablanca. NY: Hyperion, 2002 Broadcast history: "The Oprah Winfrey Show," June 10, 1997 Turner Classic Movies, "There's No Place Like Hollywood" interstitial, August-November, 2014 Turner Classic Movies, Night of Programming (Casablanca), November 18, 2014

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-25
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Bert Lahr's Cowardly Lion costume from the Wizard of Oz

Bert Lahr's Cowardly Lion costume from the Wizard of Oz Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1939. Designed by Adrian and constructed of lion skin and fur, featuring a hidden zipper front and an attached tail verso, now displayed on a custom figure featuring a photo-realistic head sculpture cast directly from actor Bert Lahr's son replete with optical glass eyes and Italian human hair wig & mane and footwear constructed out of lion pelt. Initially conserved at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, this costume has been examined recently and is thought to be in exhibit-ready condition, and includes a professional fine art shipping crate. Provenance: Discovered carefully bundled up in one of the oldest buildings on the MGM lot. Acquired by The Comisar Collection, leading curators of Hollywood ephemera, who supervised the costume's initial conservation and ongoing collection care over the past two decades. Publication history: Stillman, William & Scarfone, Jay. The Wizard of Oz: The Official 75th Anniversary Companion (NY: 2014); Stillman, William & Scarfone, Jay. The Wizardry of Oz: The Artistry and Magic of the 1939 MGM Classic (NY: 2004); The Hollywood Reporter; The Los Angeles Times; and others. Featured on various television programs including "The Today Show"; "The Oprah Winfrey Show"; in documentary segments on The History Channel and The Learning Channel; and others. For most of us, the Cowardly Lion is the most endearing character in Oz: we can all identify with being crippled by irrational fear and desiring more courage. The film's production team had no option (in the days before synthetic fur) for creating a realistic lion costume other than fashioning it out of real skins, and the challenge then became to find lion hides that visually matched each other close enough so that several costumes could be made and used interchangeably throughout filming. This proved to be impossible, as each available lion hide had very particular hair patterns, swirls, coloration, scars, abrasions, fur loss, etc. that were unique to the one animal; and the only solution was for actor Bert Lahr to primarily wear one costume throughout filming and for stunt and stand-in performers to wear another (though at least one other Lion costume was constructed during pre-production, used for test shots, but ultimately never used during filming). As a result, after each long day of filming under early and unbearable Technicolor lights, the Lahr Lion costume had to be placed in an industrial drying bin overnight so that the perspiration could be dried before the next production day. This costume—with the hides' very distinctive matching properties— has been attributed through screen matches to over a dozen different scenes in which the Cowardly Lion character portrayed by Lahr appears, including his first meeting with Dorothy when he sings, "If I Only Had the Nerve"; as he skips with his friends down the Yellow Brick Road; as he sings "If I Were King of the Forest"; as he visits the Wash & Brush Company; as he meets the Wizard of Oz; as he helps rescue Dorothy; as the Wicked Witch of the West melts; as the humbug Wizard awards him his medal for conspicuous acts of bravery; and finally as Dorothy says goodbye to her friends and clicks her heels together returning to her Kansas farm home. Indeed, these are not only the most iconographic scenes of The Wizard of Oz—the most watched film of all time—but they are among the most memorable in cinematic history. A detailed analysis of the matching properties of the costume, a collection care report and an insurance appraisal are available upon request.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-25

An Abbey Road Studios EMI TG12345 MK IV recording console used between 1971-1983, housed in Studio 2, the console which Pink Floyd used

An Abbey Road Studios EMI TG12345 MK IV recording console used between 1971-1983, housed in Studio 2, the console which Pink Floyd used to record their landmark album, The Dark Side of the Moon. Also used by many other artists including: Paul McCartney and Wings, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Kate Bush and in later years The Cure, the desk comprising: 40 channels with limiter/compressor on each, 4 echo returns and 16 monitors, MK3 feature cassettes, track monitor cassettes, dual channel 16 track sync mixer, two banks of 12 pairs of microphone channels, 8 pairs of main channels to centre section, monitor level controls for tracks 1-8 on left and 9-16 on right side, Ernest Turner manufactured VU meters comprising 16 full size VU meters and approximately 50 channel VUs, quadrant radial faders by Painton, with approximately 1600 capacitors (many original), housed in the original semi-wrap-around frame made of block board with teak and mahogany veneer, which disassembles into three parts, together with a patchboy of steel encased in industrial standard flight case and made-to-measure freight crates for the console parts (speakers in the illustrated image not included); accompanied by letters concerning the provenance, including one from Ken Townsend, the Abbey Road Studio Manager at the time and future Chairman; a documented history from Brian Gibson, the renowned Studio Technician for Abbey Road and TG console world authority; a current technical appraisal stating the console is in working order; PDF manuals for the equipment; and a copy of the album The Dark Side of the Moon (1973) Harvest pressing. Images of the console in Abbey Road available on request. Please note: This lot will be on view at Bonhams Knightsbridge in London March 19-27, and will not be on view in our New York offices. The EMI TG 12345 MK IV console has been referred to as the greatest console ever constructed due to the collaboration with Abbey Road and EMI engineers, with the production of every component being built to military precision. Abbey Road studios was the recording studio of choice for experimental and progressive artists to use throughout the 1960s-1970s and is still a busy venue today. The sound recording of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon is testament to the superior engineering of this recording equipment. This recording console, located in Studio 2, was one of only two custom made by EMI engineers for Abbey Road studios. It was commissioned by Abbey Road to update the previous recording/mixing equipment from the MK II model, an eight-track console that had been well used from 1968, but which had become obsolete. David Gilmour recalls attending a meeting with the key staff at Abbey Road around 1967 to discuss the equipment upgrade. Abbey Road and their EMI engineers in Hayes wanted to go from their in-house designed REDD Valve mixing desk with four-track outputs to one with eight-track outputs. Gilmour remembers, "I said that they should ignore eight-track altogether and switch from four-track to 16-track; doing that would have saved them money and put them in front of most other studios." Pink Floyd wound up recording most of their 1971 album, Meddle, at George Martin's Air Studios, which already had the required 16-track setup. EMI's engineers in Hayes got the go ahead to make a 16-track console, the MK III version, to follow the outdated MK II. This was, however, done without consulting the studio and did not meet the needs of their sound engineers and producers. The console was thus rejected by Abbey Road and in its place, EMI created the present MK IV using the key elements that Abbey Road loved from the MK II and combining it with components from the MK III. In 1972 Pink Floyd was back at Abbey Road Studios ready to put down what was to be their momentous album, The Dark Side of the Moon. It had taken some time for the band to get over Syd Barrett's departure in the late 1960s. In his absence, Roger Waters and Dave Gilmour became the creative forces of the band. Waters devised the theme behind Dark Side. Author John Harris reports Waters saying, "I remember sitting in [Mason's] kitchen and explaining this idea; that the whole record might be about the pressures and preoccupations that divert us from our potential for positive action, if you like." Nick Mason elaborates in his book, Inside Out, A Personal History of Pink Floyd, that the album encompasses "Deadlines, travel, the stress of flying, the lure of money, a fear of dying, and the problems of mental instability spilling over into madness ... Armed with this list Roger went off to continue working on the lyrics." Following their live performances at the Rainbow Theatre in North London, they devised the tracks and some of the sound effects and were ready to start recording in the studio. The entire album was recorded at Abbey Road, the majority using the console in this lot from Studio 2. Alan Parsons, the album's producer, commented in an interview with Premier Guitar in 2012, "... the band members were experienced in the studio. They arguably were the most technically minded band out there. They knew what a recording studio was capable of, and they took full advantage. And they worked me hard—they always worked their engineers hard to push the barriers...." The superior production and engineering of this concept album produced a continuous flow of five tracks on each side. The quality and clarity of the recording has been praised, as Mason discusses: "Alan had acquired – as all EMI trainees did – a remarkably thorough knowledge of all aspects of working in a recording studio. He was a bloody good engineer. But he also had a very good ear and was a capable musician in his own right." The ethereal nature of the sound effects, the heartbeat that resonates in the intro and outro of the album as an undertone throughout, juxtaposed with the alarm clocks and sound of people running, had not been present on a concept album like this before. The clarity and depth of the effects obtained through the state-of-the-art equipment made them stand out all the more. The album was released to critical acclaim and saw a huge turning point in the band's commercial success. Through this visceral album, they tapped into the feelings, imaginations, political endeavors and mysticism of the era. Released against a backdrop of the Vietnam War, the recent landing of man on the moon and a move from the era of flower power, this album hit the popular consciousness of the youth at the time. It remained on the charts for 741 weeks and was voted the number 1 Rock Album of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine in 2015. Brian Gibson, the world authority on TG consoles and an ex-engineer from Abbey Road, has stated that the TG MK IV is recognized by the recording industry as the best sounding console in the world. The document included in this lot from Gibson states, "There had often been problems in the past with noise and extraneous noise pickup (radio signals) on the TG consoles and the MK IV continued this tradition ... In an attempt to solve these noise pickup problems the second MK IV console which was destined for Abbey Road studio 2 ... featured a revised interconnection design. Rather than a largely unsupported cable loom, the main interconnection wiring was built into steel trunking which was fixed to the inside of the console frame." The famous Studio 2 at Abbey Road gained notoriety following the Beatles' numerous recordings there during the 1960s; so much so that many artists insisted on using only this studio. It was also the hub for Paul McCartney and Wings, Ringo Starr, George Harrison and Kate Bush for some of their independent/solo work, all of whom recorded through the years while this MK IV was in use. (Images of McCartney and Kate Bush, both with this console, are available to view on request.) In the letter from renowned ex-Abbey Road Studio Manager Ken Townsend, which accompanies this lot, he states, "I can further guarantee that this console was installed in Studio 2 from 1971 to 1983. It is one of two which differed by their internal cableform." In 1983 the TG MK IV console was deemed out-dated and an upgrade was necessary to meet current recording requirements. The vendor of this lot, Producer Mike Hedges, was working at Abbey Road at the time and purchased the console directly from the studios. Since then Hedges has housed the iconic console in his personal recording studio and has maintained it in excellent working condition. Some of these features can be viewed working in the recent footage recorded by Hedges in February of this year. The sister console is currently housed at Prime Studios in Austria. It was brokered in 2011 between a studio in LA and a dealer of studio equipment. Estimate: Refer to department Technical disclaimer Electronic or mechanical parts may not operate or may not comply with current statutory requirements. You should not assume that electrical items designed to operate on main electricity will be suitable for connection to the main electricity supply and you should obtain a report from a qualified electrician on their status before doing so. If you yourself do not have the expertise regarding this lot, you should consult someone who does to advise you. We can also suggest experts relating to this specific console. Literature MASON, Nick. Inside Out, A Personal History of Pink Floyd (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2011). SOUTHALL, Brian, VINCE, Peter & ROUSE, Allan. Abbey Road (London: Brian Southall, Omnibus Press, 2002). POVEY, Glenn. The Complete Pink Floyd: The Ultimate Reference (New York: Sterling, 2016). Pink Floyd: The Making of The Dark Side of the Moon (Iris Productions and Eagle Rock Entertainment, released 2003). www.musictech.net/2015/06/landmark-productions-pink-floyd-the-dark-side-of-the-moon/ www.premierguitar.com/articles/Studio_Legends_Alan_Parsons_on_Dark_Side_of_the_Moon?page=2 www.europe.newsweek.com/eclipse-330540?rm=eu In total: Height: 47 in; width: 125 in; depth: 55 in.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-27
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1961 MERCEDES BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER

1961 MERCEDES BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER Document de circulation européen Châssis n° 19804210002820 Moteur n° 19898010002891 - Matching numbers - Rare version à freins à disques, hard-top et valise - Restauration complète en Allemagne par un des meilleurs spécialistes - Modèle mythique, performant et confortable - Restauré par le spécialiste allemand Lars Romblesheim, freins à disques, hard-top et valises En 1951, Max Hoffman part à Stuttgart et réussit à obtenir la fabrication de deux voitures dont il pressent le besoin: la 190 SL, confortable et solide mais trop peu sportive, et une version des voitures de course qui s'illustrèrent à la Panaméricaine, la 300 SL, mise au point par Rudy Ulhenhaut. Pour obtenir gain de cause, Hoffman achète ferme et comptant les mille premiers coupés 300 SL. 1400 coupés "Papillon" furent construits en quatre ans. Mais la dernière année, la demande baissait quand, pour relancer les ventes, fut présentée la version roadster à Genève, en mars 1957. La voiture était allongée de cinq centimètres. Le moteur était équipé de l'arbre à cames le plus performant, disponible seulement en option sur le coupé, et surtout le train arrière fut amélioré. Le point d'articulation des deux demi-arbres de roues fut abaissé et un original troisième ressort compensateur fut placé transversalement. Le châssis fut bien sûr transformé et renforcé. D'après les archives Mercedes, ce roadster 300 SL est sorti d'usine le 4 mai 1961, de teinte "bleu-gris" (code DB166), avec sellerie en cuir crème, (code DB209). La voiture est équipée d'origine des désirables freins à disques, et comporte quelques options: équipement US, spécifications Export, autoradio Becker Mexico et extincteur. Elle est alors équipée d'une capote noire et d'un hard-top. Livrée aux États-Unis, elle revient en Allemagne dans les années 1990, entre les mains du spécialiste Lars Romblesheim. Chez lui, elle bénéficie d'une restauration complète au cours de laquelle la coque est mise à nue. Chaque boulon est démonté, refait, rien n'est laissé au hasard, dans la grande tradition des restaurations de haute qualité allemande. Elle reçoit une peinture gris métallisé avec sellerie en cuir rouge. Côté mécanique, la voiture est équipée d'un allumage électronique et de nouveaux axes de transmission. Le pont arrière est restauré et le moteur ne réclame pas de reconstruction particulière, mais Lars Romblesheim pense que la culasse a été revue ou remplacée. A l'intérieur, la voiture est équipée d'un volant Nardi, qui correspond à une option d'époque, et d'un discret tripmaster, pour participer aux rallyes historiques. La voiture est ensuite cédée à Rolf Elzer, de Kiel, puis en 2003 à Lebek Bekleidunsind, suivi du Dr Michael Wollrath-Roediger, de Hanau. Lors de cette dernière, le compteur de vitesse a été remis à zéro, ce qui permet de vérifier que, depuis, la voiture n'a parcouru que 18 000 km. Elle est accompagnée de son dossier historique, d'un certificat d'authenticité émis par Mercedes-Benz, des factures de remise en état et d'un manuel d'utilisation. Équipée de sa capote, d'un hard-top et de bagages (sauf la petite valise), ce roadster 300 SL se présente dans un état rare et saura satisfaire le plus difficile des amateurs. Le Roadster 300 SL, avec sa grande sœur Papillon, fait partie de ces voitures légendaires qui ont construit l'histoire de l'automobile. Elle est présente dans l'inconscient collectif de plusieurs générations, des femmes comme des hommes, au même titre qu'une Ferrari 250 California. Sa beauté est immense, son élégance intemporelle, et pour toutes ces raisons, elle représente un placement sûr et prospère. European Registration Chassis n° 19804210002820 Engine n° 19898010002891 - Matching numbers - Rare version with disc brakes, hard-top and suitcase - Completely restored by renowned German specialist - Legendary model, high performance and comfortable - Restored by the German specialist Lars Romblesheim, disc brakes, hard-top and suitcases In 1951, Max Hoffman left Stuttgart having succeeded in arranging the manufacture of two cars he saw a need for: the 190 SL, comfortable and solid but unsporty, and a version of the 300 SL race car, developed by Rudy Ulhenhaut, that had made a name for itself in the Panamericana. To ensure its success, Hoffman ordered the first thousand 300 SL coupés. In total, some 1,400 Gullwings were built in four years. During the final year, demand for this model dropped when the roadster version was launched in Geneva in March 1957 to boost sales. The car was lengthened by 5cm, and the engine was fitted with high-performance overhead cams (available only as an option on the coupé), and the rear axle was updated. The suspension was lowered and a third compensating spring was fitted lengthways. The chassis was transformed and strengthened. According to Mercedes archives, this 300 SL Roadster left the factory on 4 May 1961, liveried in blue-grey (code DB166), with cream leather upholstery (code DB209). The car was originally fitted with desirable disc brakes, and other options included US equipment to Export specification, Becker Mexico radio and fire extinguisher. It came with a black hood and hard-top. Delivered to the US, it returned to Germany during the 1990s, into the hands of specialist Lars Romblesheim where the car was stripped to bare metal and completely restored. Each bolt was removed and re-fitted and nothing was left to chance, in the grand tradition of high quality German restorations. It was re-sprayed in metallic grey and re-upholstered in red leather. The car was fitted with electronic ignition and new drive shafts, and the rear axle was refurbished. The engine didn't require rebuilding, and Lars Romblesheim noted that the cylinder head may have been worked on or replaced. Inside, the car was fitted with a Nardi steering wheel, which would have been a period option, and a discreet tripmaster, for participation in historic rallies. The car was then sold to Rolf Elzer, from Kiel, then to Lebek Bekleidunsind in 2003, followed by Dr Michael Wollrath-Roediger, from Hanau. The latter had the odometer reset to zero, and the car has covered just 18,000 km since then. The car comes with a history file, Mercedes-Benz certificate of authenticity, restoration invoices and owner's manual. Complete with hood, hard-top and all except the smallest suitcase, this 300 SL Roadster is presented in a rare condition that will satisfy the most demanding enthusiast. As with its big sister, the Gullwing, the Roadster 300 SL is a legendary automobile. It has been present in the collective subconscious of several generations, in the same way as the Ferrari 250 California. It has an immense beauty and a timeless elegance, and for these reasons, remains a great investment. Estimation 570 000 - 650 000 € Sold for 643,288 €

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2012-07-07

Hergé

HERGÉ TINTIN ON A MARCHÉ SUR LA LUNE (T.17), CASTERMAN 1954 Planche originale n°59, prépubliée dans Le Journal de Tintin belge n° 49 du 9 décembre 1953. Encre de Chine et gouache blanche sur papier 37 × 51 cm (14,57 × 20,08 in.) Drôle de drame ! — Il ne manque pas de scènes dramatiques dans On a marché sur la Lune. Celle-ci en fait partie. La fusée construite par le professeur Tournesol a permis à Tintin et à ses compagnons de fouler le sol lunaire et d’y mener des investigations scientifiques. Elle effectue son voyage de retour. Cette équipée a déjà coûté la vie à deux personnes, dont les corps voguent désormais dans l’espace. Mais on n’est peut-être pas au bout du compte : les réserves d’oxygène sont épuisées, et l’engin fonce vers la Terre en pilotage automatique. À bord, tout le monde est peut-être mort ! C’est en raison de cet ultime suspense, particulièrement insoutenable, qu’Hergé prend garde de ne pas révéler ce qui se passe à l’intérieur de la fusée. Montrer Tintin à ce stade du récit serait tuer le suspense ! Privilégier l’incertitude c’est, au contraire, le maintenir. Pour rendre la situation haletante, Hergé a d’autres tours ans son sac : un montage cinématographique, avec alternance de cadrages et de points de vue, une extrême rigueur documentaire, ici focalisée sur les véhicules et sur le matériel d’incendie… Et puis, un ultime gag qui, s’il peut prêter à rire, ajoute un drame au drame : le croisement des trajectoires de la voiture et de la fusée en phase d’atterrissage ! Sans la moindre retouche — Publiée à l’origine dans Le Journal de Tintin numéro 49 (édition belge) du 9 décembre 1953, cette planche était la 114e sur les 117 qui y furent reproduites à partir du 30 mars 1950 sous le titre On a marché sur la Lune. La suite est connue : introduction de cases de grand format, ajout de l’une ou l’autre planche, suppression de séquences entières, ajustements divers… cet ensemble fut, par la suite, largement remanié par Hergé afin de donner naissance à deux albums distincts, comptant chacun 62 planches. Objectif Lune fut publié en octobre 1953 et On a marché sur la Lune l’année suivante. Devenue la planche 59 du second épisode, la planche du retour sur Terre n’a, pour sa part (et contrairement à beaucoup d’autres), subi aucune transformation. Suspense garanti — Le souci du scénariste Hergé, à cet ultime moment crucial de son récit, était de prolonger le suspense qu’il avait mis en place. Tombés à court d’oxygène, Tintin et ses compagnons s’avéraient incapables de maintenir le contact radio avec la base durant cette phase particulièrement délicate de leur équipée. C’est évidemment la raison pour laquelle le dessinateur s’est fait un devoir, ici, de ne montrer ni le professeur Tournesol, chef de l’expédition, ni Tintin, ni le capitaine Haddock, ni messieurs Dupond et Dupont, ni même Milou… pas même évanouis ! Le lecteur doit rester jusqu’au bout dans l’incertitude quant à leur hypothétique survie. C’est là une tension insoutenable… qu’Hergé peut se permettre de maintenir, puisqu’on sait que, de toute manière, les héros ne peuvent mourir. Puisqu’il lui faut faire durer son plaisir (de faire peur), et prolonger ainsi celui du lecteur (à qui il ne déplait pas forcément d’avoir peur), Hergé a eu l’idée d’ajouter un suspense au suspense, un drame secondaire au drame principal. En scénariste aguerri, il a imaginé que la voiture de Monsieur Baxter, le directeur de la base, s’engage sur l’aire d’atterrissage de la fusée au moment précis où cette dernière arrivait à la verticale de son point de chute. L’alternance des plans et des points de vue, ainsi que l’attribution par Hergé de surfaces différentes aux cases, ou encore le recours a des focales variées dans les deux dernières, tout cela confère à la page une dimension quasiment cinématographique. Dès qu’il aura tourné la page, le lecteur de l’album retrouvera Baxter et son chauffeur, certes un peu « échauffés » par l’aventure, mais sains et saufs. Pour Tintin et pour les autres, il devra encore attendre un peu. Documentation à double sens — L’aspect proprement documentaire revêt ici une dimension particulière. On n’ira pas jusqu’à prétendre que le paysage montagneux vu du ciel correspond trait pour trait à un site précis du massif des Carpates… ou des Zmyhlpathes. Mais d’autres éléments doivent retenir l’attention : la fusée et les véhicules terrestres. On ne compte plus le nombre de fois où Hergé et son collaborateur Bob De Moor ont eu à représenter la fameuse fusée à damier, sous tous les angles et dans toutes les positions. À chaque fois, ils ont eu à tracer un jeu d’ellipses parfaites, et à les inscrire dans l’une ou l’autre perspective linéaire. Le résultat force cette fois encore l’admiration. Montrée sous quatre angles différents, la voiture de Monsieur Baxter a demandé la même attention. Comme il se doit, il s’agit d’un modèle récent : une Ford Tudor Sedan de 1950 dénichée dans un numéro du Saturday Evening Post, dont les coloristes pousseront la conscience professionnelle jusqu’à reproduire la teinte de la carrosserie. Quant aux véhicules des pompiers, en attente ici mais en action à la page suivante, leur histoire mérite d’être contée également, tant elle fait d’Hergé, toujours soucieux de la crédibilité de ses créations, un modèle de rigueur. Il avait pris contact avec la Régie des Voies aériennes, se disant que pour décrire les installations et le matériel d’intervention en cas d’incendie d’une base spatiale, il convenait de se documenter sur ceux d’un aérodrome. En l’occurrence celui de l’Aérodrome National de Bruxelles. Ayant obtenu toutes les autorisations requises, il y avait envoyé un photographe de ses amis. Par ailleurs, le chef du Service Incendie de la Régie avait pris la peine de lui décrire le déroulement de la « chute » (dans tous les sens du terme) de son histoire, dialogues compris. Hergé n’aura eu qu’à changer quelques termes. Ce sont donc les véhicules d’intervention de l’aéroport national qui apparaissent aux dernières pages de On a marché sur la Lune. Le reportage a semblé si intéressant au directeur du service Exploitation de la Régie qu’il reprendra contact avec Hergé pour obtenir de sa part un jeu d’épreuves susceptible d’enrichir les archives de son service. Et voilà comment Hergé a documenté en retour ceux qui l’avaient documenté !

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2016-11-19
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Hergé

HERGÉ TINTIN Illustration originale réalisée pour l’exposition de bande dessinée du pavillon belge lors de l’Exposition Universelle de Montréal en 1967. Signée. Encre de Chine sur papier 49,2 X 94,3 CM (19,37 X 37,13 IN.) En cette fin d’année 1966, et depuis longtemps déjà, la gloire de Tintin est largement assurée sur le plan international. Hergé, son créateur, peaufine ce qui sera la vingt-deuxième aventure de son petit reporter, Vol 714 pour Sydney, récit dont la publication débutera fin septembre dans le Journal de Tintin, permettant au passage à l’hebdomadaire des jeunes de 7 a 77 ans de fêter dignement ses vingt ans d’existence. Neuf ans après celle de Bruxelles, une Exposition Universelle et Internationale sera présentée à Montréal du 28 avril au 29 octobre 1967. Elle aura pour thème “Terre des Hommes” et pour ambition celle de montrer le Spectacle du Siècle à l’échelle planétaire. La Belgique y aura naturellement son propre pavillon, agencé sous la devise “Rien d’humain n’est étranger au Belge”. Tout un programme ! Le hall d’honneur présentera d’importants chefs-d’œuvre du patrimoine artistique belge. À l’étage, une section mettra en valeur le rôle éminent joué par les Belges dans le monde de l’édition, et plus particulièrement dans celui de la Bande Dessinée. Pour éviter tout problème de traduction, les noms des auteurs tiendront lieu d’intitulé, et leurs personnages se présenteront par phylactères interposés, dans leur langue d’origine. Parmi les projets qui ont été soumis au Commissariat, pour rassembler les principaux héros de la BD belge, à quelque école qu’ils appartiennent, c’est celui des Studios Hergé qui a été retenu. Selon cette présentation en sept panneaux de belle taille, la plupart des personnages qui font le succès des magazines, et dont les albums sont traduits dans différentes langues, seront rassemblés. Ceux d’Hergé seront certes mis à l’honneur en se voyant attribuer le panneau central, mais c’est parfaitement légitime, vu leur notoriété et le rôle de “locomotive” qu’on leur prête. Les autres — ceux de Spirou comme ceux de Tintin — se répartiront les six autres panneaux, en une joyeuse et chatoyante galerie. Tous ces dessins seront reproduits en sérigraphie, en couleur, sur des plaques de verre de deux centimètres d’épaisseur fabriquées dans la région de Charleroi. Ces éléments seront fixés sur les murs du pavillon, la transparence de leur support et leur écartement par rapport à la paroi devant leur conférer un relief saisissant. Placés au centre de cet ensemble, isolés sur un panneau qui aura plus de deux mètres cinquante de hauteur, les héros sélectionnés par Hergé dans la “famille” qu’il a donnée à son personnage vedette, auront donc pour mission de présenter aux visiteurs les principaux héros de la Bande Dessinée belge, au moyen de phylactères (rédigés et en français et en anglais, comme il se doit au Canada). Après avoir mis au point la composition au crayon, en format réduit, et vu la taille imposante à laquelle ses héros seront sérigraphiés, Hergé en a établi la mise au net à l’encre de Chine dans un format propice à l’agrandissement définitif. Une sélection drastique s’est opérée au moment de choisir ceux qui allaient ainsi s’avancer, tout sourire, à la rencontre des visiteurs du pavillon : ni Bianca Castafiore, ni Nestor (pourtant devenus familiers au fil du temps) n’ont trouvé grâce aux yeux de leur auteur. Derrière Tintin et Milou s’avancent un Haddock parfaitement détendu, fumant une bonne pipe, les inséparables Dupond et Dupont, leur melon vissé sur la tête et la canne fixé à l’avant-bras, et le brave Tournesol, tout au fond, tenant son pendule d’une main et son précieux parapluie de l’autre. Avec sa tête ronde et sa houppe caractéristique, avec ses pantalons de golf plus intemporels que franchement démodés, Tintin ouvre la marche en adressant au public un geste amical de la main. Les manches retroussées, il incarne comme toujours le dynamisme juvénile. C’est lui qui prononce les mots d’accueil destinés à présenter ses confrères en BD, qu’Hergé ne considère plus depuis longtemps comme des concurrents. Le nom de Tintin est tracé de façon imposante, agissant comme un signal bien mieux que ne l’aurait fait celui d’Hergé si ce dernier s’était conformé à la consigne appliquée aux autres. Milou gambade à côté de son maître, son traditionnel os fixé à la mâchoire. Légèrement en retrait, le capitaine Haddock, qu’on a connu plus bougon, les suit dans la tenue fatiguée qu’il affectionne. La démarche souple, une main en poche, il ne dit rien mais son sourire éclatant vaut tous les “tonnerre de Brest”. Comme à son habitude, Dupond a le geste sentencieux en s’adressant à Dupont. Quant au professeur Tournesol, si typé dans sa tenue comme on n’en fait plus, il est rarement tombé aussi juste en proférant son célèbre « Pardon ! Un peu plus a l’ouest » : Montréal est incontestablement à l’ouest de son lieu de naissance !

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2016-05-21

CLARK GABLE

CLARK GABLE The gold plated brittania statue with the engraved front plaque, ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES FIRST AWARD 1934; between the base and the statue the engraved band CLARK GABLE. Under the base of the statue, the circular engraved plaque ACADEMY FIRST AWARD TO CLARK GABLE FOR HIS PERFORMANCE IN IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT--12 in. high; together with a black and white photograph of Mr. Gable holding his Academy Award the night he received it in Hollywood--10 x 8 in. Although Clark Gable will always be remembered for his portrayal of the dashing blockade runner "Rhett Butler" in Gone With The Wind, it would be for a role he did not want to accept that he would win Hollywood's highest Award. The actor starred as the just-fired reporter who chases runaway heiress Claudette Colbert across the country on a madcap journey. In classic "boy meets girl" style, Frank Capra's directing effort firmly established Columbia Studios as a major Hollywood studio. Considered one of the first screwball comedies of the Thirties, It Happened One Night made an overnight sensation of the thirty three year old Clark Gable, who was loaned out to Columbia from M.G.M. for the project. Louis B. Mayer thought so little of the film that he felt it "punishment" for the actor who had pleaded sick to Mayer before beginning his last film. It would be the only Academy Award that the "King Of Hollywood" would ever receive in his illustrious forty year career. The film is noted for several progressive moments, including the classic "Walls Of Jericho" scene where Gable and Colbert throw a throw a blanket over a rope to separate their motel room as they undress; the actor takes his shirt off to reveal that he is not wearing an undershirt. Reaction to the scene was so strong by the movie going public that sales of men's undergarments allegedly dropped 40.

  • USAUSA
  • 1996-12-15

Unverkauft

Joe dimaggio's 1936 new york yankees rookie home uniform

In 1936, America was held tightly in the grip of the Depression. Babe Ruth had retired. Lou Gehrig still continued his excellence but in a quiet manner, inspiring more genuflection than excitement. Then, that May, the rookie from the Pacific Coast League arrived in New York and provided a transfusion of awe and electricity to the Nation’s favorite game. The bulk of Joe DiMaggio’s legend was created during his first tour in the majors, before his country's call to arms during World War II robbed him of three prime seasons. Heralded beyond any rookie in the game before him, DiMaggio somehow exceeded unsurpassable expectations. Had there been a Rookie of the Year Award in 1936 it would have been Joe's. He hit .323 with 29 HRs and 125 RBI and helped bring a World Series title to New York in his first season. From the moment Joe DiMaggio first put on his pinstripes, he made the Yankees “his” team --- in some ways, they are still his team.   “Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?” Joe DiMaggio was more than the most complete all-around player of his generation. He was more than the player who set one of the game's most cherished records, hitting safely in 56 consecutive games. Baseball has produced many icons, but it has produced only one Joe DiMaggio. He has proven to be the most enduring symbol of baseball greatness. In the almost half a century from his retirement until his death on March 8, 1999, he retained his image as America's ultimate hero. What American male wouldn't sell his soul to duplicate the exacta that Joltin' Joe accomplished - playing centerfield for the Yankees and marrying the sexiest woman on the planet? "Joe DiMaggio is what you get when you build mystique on top of greatness," said Ron Swoboda, the former Met who played a generation after DiMaggio. Though known to be short tempered in private, DiMaggio refrained from showing such behavior in public. A painfully private person, he always was careful and protective of his image, understanding that it was his legacy. "It is not for DiMaggio's records that we remember him," wrote Ira Berkow of The New York Times. "He is best remembered for the persona of Joe DiMaggio. He remains a symbol of excellence, elegance, power and, to be sure, gentleness." His marriage to Marilyn Monroe was an amazing coupling of American celebrity: The country's most revered athlete hitched to its most adored actress. There was this conversation when she returned to their honeymoon suite in Tokyo after entertaining more than 100,000 servicemen in Korea: "It was so wonderful, Joe," she said. "You never heard such cheering." "Yes I have," he said, quietly. DiMaggio burst on to the major league landscape in 1936, helping the Yankees begin the second chapter in their dynasty. After winning only one pennant and World Series in the previous seven years, behind DiMaggio, the Bombers won four straight world championships. In DiMaggio's thirteen seasons, they won ten pennants and nine World Series. When he retired in 1951, he had a lifetime average of .325, down from the .339 it had been before he served three years in the military during World War II. He won two home-run crowns (1937 and 1948) on his way to 361. (Remarkably, he struck out only 369 times, a ratio of dingers to whiffs that no other long-ball hitter even approaches.) DiMaggio hit over .300 eleven times and won two batting titles - .381 in 1939 and .352 in 1940. He knocked in more than 100 runs nine times, leading the American League with 125 in 1941 and 155 in 1948 and finishing second with 167 in 1937. He won three Most Valuable Player Awards (1939, 1941 and 1947). His fame was recorded in song and prose. In the sixties, when Simon and Garfunkel wanted to express a longing for another time, they wrote in "Mrs. Robinson": "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?” "A nation turns its lonely eyes to you." Earlier, Ernest Hemingway had turned to the Yankee Clipper when he sought a symbol. In his novel The Old Man and the Sea, the old man says, "I would like to take the great DiMaggio fishing. They say his father was a fisherman. Maybe he was as poor as we are and would understand." He was a fisherman, all right. Joe, the eighth of nine children, was born on Nov. 25, 1914, in Martinez, Calif., a small fishing village 25 miles northeast of San Francisco. The next year, his father moved the family to San Francisco because he heard the fishing was better off its waters. While Zio Pepe, as DiMaggio's father was called, wanted his five sons to become fishermen like him, only the oldest two did. Joe and brothers Vince and Dom became major league baseball players. Joe spent three seasons with the San Francisco Seals, and, in 1933,  as an eighteen-year old rookie, set a Pacific Coast League record by hitting safely in 61 consecutive games. "Baseball didn't really get into my blood until I knocked off that hitting streak," DiMaggio said. "Getting a daily hit became more important to me than eating, drinking or sleeping. Overnight I became a personality." The Yankees bought him for a reported $25,000 and five players after the 1934 season. They kept him in San Francisco for another year, and he tore up the PCL again with a .398 average, 34 homers and 154 RBI. As a rookie with the Yankees, he was on the cover of Time magazine during the 1936 season. Lou Gehrig was the AL MVP, and DiMaggio helped Gehrig by providing an equally powerful weapon, as he hit .323 with 29 homers, 132 runs and 125 RBI. He also led A.L. outfielders with 22 assists. DiMaggio helped the Yankees to totals of 102, 102, 99 and 106 victories his first four seasons plus a 16-3 record in the World Series. In the summer of 1941, a nation turned its eyes to him. During his record hitting streak, which began on May 15 with an inauspicious 1-for-4 game, the Les Brown big band recorded “Joltin' Joe DiMaggio”, a hit that was played day and night on the radio. Finally, on July 17, before a crowd of 67,468 in Cleveland, pitchers Al Smith and Jim Bagby Jr. kept him hitless, thanks to two outstanding plays by third baseman Ken Keltner and a good one by shortstop Lou Boudreau. He hit .408 (91-of-223) with 15 homers and 55 RBI during the streak. After that game, DiMaggio went on a 16-game hitting streak. DiMaggio, who batted .357 for the season, won the MVP despite Ted Williams hitting .406 with a league-leading 37 homers. He also took the 1947 MVP - by one point - over Williams, though the Splendid Splinter won the Triple Crown. In the late 1940s, DiMaggio showed his Achilles heel, or heels, literally. At times, he said, "it felt as if a nail was stuck into them - only 20 times worse." An operation in November 1948 didn't help much. He wasn't able to play until June 28, but made a legendary return, hitting four homers and knocking in nine runs as the Yankees swept three games in Boston, igniting one of the most thrilling pennant chases ever. DiMaggio hit .346 in 76 games, and the Yankees won the 1949 American League championship on the season's final day by beating the Red Sox. When he hit .373 for the final six weeks of 1950, lifting his average to .301, and drove home 122 runs probably convinced DiMaggio he had one more year left despite his lingering ailments. He didn't - sinking to .263 and 12 homers in his final 1951 season - and tearfully he retired that December. "I stayed one season too long," he said. After his love affair ended with baseball, he began one with Monroe. He was 39, she 27 when they married on Jan. 14, 1954, despite, according to Gay Talese in Esquire, "disharmony in temperament and time: he was tired of publicity, she was thriving on it; he was intolerant of tardiness, she was always late." When the marriage ended in divorce nine months later, it was, as another writer said, "an adult version of learning there is no Santa Claus." But even after their divorce, they remained friends. This enhanced his image. After her death in 1962, it was DiMaggio who supervised her funeral arrangements and had flowers put on her grave three times a week for 20 years. DiMaggio remained in the spotlight as a spokesman for several companies. But he carried himself with grace even when he sold Mr. Coffee machines or appeared in ads for a New York bank. There was no sense he had cheapened himself. At nearly every public appearance he made, DiMaggio was introduced as "the greatest living ballplayer." And now, even after his death, he remains an icon, an American folk hero. – Larry Schwartz (ESPN SportsCentury) 1936 Joe DiMaggio, twenty one years old, tall and slender, slow to smile, yet quietly confident, made his first trip east of the Rocky Mountains, on his way to spring training in 1936. Having conquered the Pacific Coast League, he was leaving behind its modest venues and limited regional dimensions that kept him close to the comforts of home and family. The Yankees made sure their prize package wouldn’t have to travel unattended: they deputized their two veteran Italian stars, Tony Lazzeri and Frank Crosetti, to fetch Joe from his home on Taylor Street, and take him cross-country in Lazzeri’s new Ford. For more than a week, they’d travel on two lane roads that zigzagged from town to town, all the way from San Francisco to St. Petersburg Florida, and a mostly silent Joe gazed out the window for 3,000 miles. For DiMaggio, this was his first look at the vastness of the country he would thrill with his exploits. In a few years, he would be said to represent this land and exemplify its virtues: aspiration, hard work, native grace, and opportunity for all. The anticipation that surrounded Joe’s debut with the Yankees was without precedent. The frenzy, perpetuated amongst fans, team officials, and especially the media, was heightened by an unexpected delay as a result of a foot injury that kept DiMaggio sidelined for the first few weeks of the 1936 season. While the star rookie mended what one New York paper dubbed “The Most Famous Hot-Foot in Yankee History” the Yankee Box office got hundred of letters asking: When would DiMaggio play? The papers covered his medical exams, his every appearance at the ballpark, even satirically speculating on the new layers of skin on his foot. The New York Times ran a lively exchange of letters from readers arguing out the pronunciation of “Dee-Mah-Jee-O”. The Yanks were playing well, but not well enough: after eighteen games, at eleven and seven, they were just where they’d finish the last three years-second place. Finally the papers trumpeted the glad news: the kid would play on Sunday, May 3 against the St. Louis Browns. A crowd of more than twenty –five thousand (by far the largest since opening day) braved cool and showery weather to cheer the debut. “An astonishing portion of the crowd,” said the New York Post, “was composed of strangers to sport-mostly Italians- who did not even know the stadium subway station.” Perhaps it was these fans who rose to their feet along with the rest, whose cheers were heard above all others when young Joe, wearing number 9, made his first plate appearance-with Yankee runners on first and third. Even as Joe grounded a tame “fielder’s choice” to third, the electricity of the moment was sustained. Later, in the sixth, Joe got a hold of a pitch from “Chief” Elon Hogsett and drove it, as the Post remarked, “like a cannon shot between the center and left fielders,” and DiMaggio had his first big-league triple. The game as a whole was never in doubt: the Browns’ pitching was awful; but who cared? The daily news ran DiMaggio headlines three inches high, but in the lead tried to keep matters in perspective: “This is the story of Joseph DiMaggio, a kid from San Francisco, though it might be proper to mention that the Yankees beat St Louis 14-5, at the stadium yesterday.” By late May, Joe was leading the league with a .411 average, and the Yankees were streaking. On the last day of May, they won their fifth straight, to sweep the Red Sox (Whom they now led by four and a half games), when DiMaggio singled in the seventh to tie, and tripled in the twelfth to win the game. Almost forty-two thousand fans (including Mayor Fiorello La Guardia) left Yankee Stadium to tell of the rookie’s glory. Young Joe had to leave the ballpark in a phalanx of cops, to protect him from adoring fans. It was seldom mentioned all year that Gehrig was having a banner season, that Dickey was pounding the ball flat: or that the whole Yankee offense was producing runs at the rate of the mighty ’27 Yanks. The story was painted in bold black and white: The Yanks, resurgent, were racing toward a pennant. And the reason for the resurgence was Joe. DiMaggio and the Yanks were the story everywhere in the country. Writers in every AL town used the coming of the rookie wonder to build attendance for their local clubs. In the month before the All-Star Game, the AP baseball feature named the rookie DiMaggio seven times (Dizzy Dean, with four mentions, ranked a distant second.) Little wonder, in the count of two million ballots from fans in forty-eight states and Canada, Joe led the voting for the 1936 AL All-Star outfield. And in case anyone had missed the story, Time Magazine took the occasion of the All-Star Game to look in on baseball- and on the cover (Where portraits of Presidents and foreign Kings were the staple) there appeared a full length photo of DiMaggio, in his rookie pinstripes. The 1936 Yankees won the pennant by seventeen games, due in large part to Joe’s .323 average, 29 HRs, and 125 RBI. In the 1936 Series matchup with the crosstown Giants, Joe added the exclamation point on his extraordinary rookie campaign, hitting .346 in the six game series, helping secure a World Series title for the Yankees in his first year of service. 1936 was the first of many spectacular seasons for DiMaggio, in a career that would include a litany of immortal feats and eight more World Series rings. But for DiMaggio himself, 1936 would forever remain his darling season in baseball. His fond reflections of 1936 later in his life are well documented. Those who knew him best have recalled that a picture of the 1936 Yankees team was among the few baseball-related photographs that hung in his home. And of all the rings, hardware, and other accoutrements bestowed upon one of baseball’s most highly decorated players, it was his 1936 World Series ring he cherished above all others, worn with pride until it was removed from his finger on the day he died. Charles “Smoke” Mason For every Joe DiMaggio, whose promise is fulfilled, whose glory a nation basks in, there are thousands of Charles Masons. However, unlike most young ball players whose only commonality with the Yankee great was a deeply rooted love of the game, Charles Mason would make a serendipitous connection to DiMaggio that would bind them for most of his life.  Like most children of the Depression, Mason’s beginnings in the Ozarks area of southwest Missouri were humble. His refuge was baseball, and he quickly showed a knack for pitching that made him a standout on the local makeshift diamonds. Mason’s live arm, which earned him the nickname “Smoke”, took him to the University of Missouri, where, after his final season there in 1938, he was approached by Yankees scout Bill Essick. “Would you like to play for the Yankees”, Bill said. Mason, who hardly knew who the Yankees were, said with optimism, “Mr. Essick, I might be pleased to play with the Yankees”. What would later prove to be ironic was the fact that Essick had not only lived on the same street in San Francisco that DiMaggio grew up on, but he had also helped sign the Yankees star only two years prior.  Signed in May of 1938 for $1,300, including $1,200 to pay off school debt and $100 for his pocket, Charles Mason boarded a bus to Joplin, Missouri to play for the Yankees’ Joplin Miners farm team. When he arrived in Joplin, Mason met team manager Joe Becker, who quickly directed him to the clubhouse to be sized up for a uniform to begin working out in. As was customary the equipment manager chose a proper garment for Mason from a mound of used uniforms that had been sent down from New York by the big league club as a cost saving measure. In a decision that took but a moment of thought, with consideration given only to size and shape, Charles Mason was handed what, unbeknownst to him, would someday be looked upon as a national heirloom. Charles worked out in his designated uniform only for a few weeks before the Joplin season began and he donned the official Miners team uniform. He maintained possession of the pinstriped “workout uniform” throughout the 1938 season, keeping it in his locker, with little use for it then and virtually no sense of its significance. It stayed with him through a second season with Joplin in 1939, during which he experienced the one and only encounter of his life with Joe DiMaggio in person. During spring training in Kansas City Florida, DiMaggio, taking a break from preparing for his fourth big league campaign, paid a visit to the aspiring Yankee prospects. Mason, recalls that he was seated in the dugout along with five other players when the Yankee Clipper strolled by, pausing to greet them casually. According to Mason he simply said, “Hello fellas”, but the impact was lasting. The impression left by DiMaggio, whose legend was rooted, but far from fruition at that time, abolished Mason’s obliviousness to the old uniform, which bore this man’s name in red stitching. At seasons end, Charles asked Mr. Becker if he could keep it. Becker said “Well, what the heck are you going to do with it, Charles?” Charles said, “I need a uniform to wear when I go back to Willow Springs. We play a lot of ball down there in the hills.” Years later, Mason would reflect that his being allowed to keep the uniform was not customary; attributing Mr. Becker’s exception to his feeling that he had a good prospect on his hands in “Smoke” Mason.  Upon his return to Willow Springs in 1939, baseball became secondary in Mason’s life. His father took ill, passing away shortly thereafter, and the uniform was relegated to a closet at his parent’s house. The next drastic turn in his life came with World War II when Charles went to serve in Panama. After the war, he met and married Frances Cochran in 1950. The forgotten uniform lay dormant until sometime in the 1950’s when Frances discovered it in the corner of the closet, while helping clean out Charles’ mother’s house. Its fate resting in her hands, she opted to save what another might have deemed disposable.      Number Nine As years passed by, the game of baseball itself would continue to be pushed down the list of priorities in Charles Mason’s life in turn by marriage, children, and an alternate profession. All the while, his most tangible link to his days as a ball player was safely stored in a moth proof bag in his home. As DiMaggio evolved into the mythic figure he is today, Mason’s appreciation for the uniform only deepened. Now, at the age of 89, he has chosen to let the world know of its existence. Manufactured by Spalding, the uniform, consisting of a jersey and pants is one of only two home pinstriped uniforms issued to Joe DiMaggio for the 1936 season (He was also issued two road uniforms, one of which resides in the Hall of Fame). Tagged exclusively for DiMaggio, the uniform features red chain stitching in the collar that reads “Joe DiMaggio 9”, while similar chain stitching in the pants reads, “Joe DiMaggio 9, 36” referencing the player, uniform number, and year of issue. DiMaggio was only assigned the uniform number 9 for his rookie season, after which he would don number 5 for the remainder of his career. It is important to note that in 1936, uniform numbers were issued based on a player’s appearance in the batting order (ie: Gehrig’s number 4 denoting his position in the clean-up spot). For incoming rookies who had not established such a position within the order, numbers were assigned in ascension based on their status as a prospect. DiMaggio was so highly touted that he was issued number 9, the lowest number available to a rookie. Every technical aspect of this uniform is as it was when Joe DiMaggio made his Yankees debut with the exception of the sleeves having been cut and the customary removal of the “NY” logo from the front of the jersey, which was done upon its designation for minor league service. No other lettering was ever applied to the front, and the “NY” outline is still clearly visible on the left breast. The jersey and pants retain superb visual appeal, demonstrating substantial, but not excessive usage wear.  Team repairs appear on the pants and a few rust spots on the uniform have been cleaned. In addition to the jersey’s documented lineage, it is supported by no less than half a dozen “photo matches“. Every Yankee pinstriped flannel garment of this era is as unique as a snowflake because each jersey and pants were hand stitched, so the pinstripe patterns vary from uniform. The alignment of the pinstripes on both the pants and jersey (most readily apparent at the seams of the shoulders, collar, number, and ‘NY’ outline) and pants (waistband, belt loops, inseam) provide exact matches to several photos of DiMaggio from 1936, many of which are presented here. Among the most compelling photo matches is an image catalogued by Corbis as being taken during the 1936 World Series (shown), providing clear evidence that this jersey was worn by Joe during his first appearance in the Fall Classic. Joe DiMaggio’s full 1936 New York Yankees home rookie uniform is one of the most historical pieces of sports memorabilia ever discovered. DiMaggio became an American hero at a time when Americans had little to feel heroic about. He was an idol when America struggled with idealism. Exuding grace and elegance in a game that less than two decades prior had been blemished by a gambling scandal, DiMaggio defined an era of American resurgence, helping to pick up a  beleaguered nation by its boot straps. Years after his retirement, and even to this day, fans marvel not only at his exploits on the diamond, but also at his extraordinary traits as an American. This uniform is the finest symbol of his legacy that has ever surfaced for public sale. $600,000 and up     Provenance: A letter of provenance from the Mason family accompanies the uniform. An additional LOA is provided by MEARS. Also included is a source list and copies of uniform “photo matches”, as well as copies of Mr. Mason’s 1938 and 1939 Joplin team photographs.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-10
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GEORGE HARRISON BEATLES OWNED AND PLAYED GUITAR

GEORGE HARRISON BEATLES OWNED AND PLAYED GUITAR 1966 - 1969 A 1964 Gibson SG Standard guitar, Serial No. 227666, translucent cherry finish, double cutaway solid body, Schaller machine heads, 22 fret fingerboard with mother-of-pearl inlays, Gibson logo inlayed to head, duel humbucker pickups, four rotary controls, selector switch, Gibson/Maestro Varitone wrap around tail piece and whammy bar, together with original hardshell case and six original Kluson tuners. Played by George Harrison from 1966 through 1969 during various Beatles appearances and recording sessions which include the last official United Kingdom concert at the NME Poll Winners Concert and during the Revolver recording session. It was also used by Harrison in two Beatles films used to promote "Paperback Writer" and "Rain" in 1966 and later played by John Lennon during the White Album sessions in 1969. Also present is a thirty-nine page custom binder which includes excellent documentation, featuring several reproduction images of Harrison playing the guitar with The Beatles as well as documentation from the book Beatles Gear: All the Fab Four's Instruments, from Stage to Studio (Andy Babiuk) and two letters verifying the guitar's authenticity. Together with additional related documents of the guitars subsequent owner, Pete Ham of Badfinger, to whom Harrison bestowed the guitar to in 1969. In 2002, the guitar was loaned to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland Ohio where it has been on display ever since.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-17

HERGE

TINTIN Le Sceptre d'Ottokar Encre de Chine et crayon bleu sur papier pour la couverture du Petit Vingtième n°29 du 20 juillet 1939 22x25 cm. Dédicacée L'étude Millon a le privilège de présenter aux enchères une pièce mythique de l'univers d'Hergé. Cette superbe illustration a été réalisée pour la couverture du Petit Vingtième n°29, paru le 20 juillet 1939. Le supplément hebdomadaire du quotidien belge Le Vingtième siècle, qui a vu naître le célèbre reporter en 1929 et dont Hergé était à l'époque le rédacteur en chef, publiait depuis le 4 août 1938 les planches du Sceptre d'Ottokar, entreprise achevée le 10 août 1939. L'oeuvre qui est aujourd'hui mise en vente, d'une rareté absolue, se situe donc au coeur du mythe hergéen, à une époque où le maître assumait encore toutes les étapes de création de ses bandes dessinées, sans l'assistance d'un studio. Cette image forte, qui représente notamment Tintin et le roi de Syldavie Muskar XII, met à l'honneur un Milou héroïque qui vient déposer la sceptre disparu aux pieds du souverain, le sauvant ainsi d'une humiliation publique et d'une déchéance programmée. Ce coup d'éclat du plus fidèle compagnon de Tintin annonce la fin proche des projets d'annexion fomentés par la Bordurie voisine, soutenue par les membres d'une conjuration implantée aux plus hauts degrés de l'État syldave. La pièce, qui a été dédicacée par l'auteur en 1975, est reproduite en page 403 du tome 3 de Hergé, Chronologie d'une oeuvre, par Philippe Goddin. Elle est accompagnée d'un certificat d'authenticité délivré par la Fondation Hergé et signée par Philippe Goddin, de même qu'un exemplaire du Petit Vingtième n°29.

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2014-12-14

HERGE

TINTIN Le Sceptre d'Ottokar Encre de Chine et crayon bleu sur papier pour la couverture du Petit Vingtième n°29 du 20 juillet 1939 22x25 cm. Dédicacée L'étude Millon a le privilège de présenter aux enchères une pièce mythique de l'univers d'Hergé. Cette superbe illustration a été réalisée pour la couverture du Petit Vingtième n°29, paru le 20 juillet 1939. Le supplément hebdomadaire du quotidien belge Le Vingtième siècle, qui a vu naître le célèbre reporter en 1929 et dont Hergé était à l'époque le rédacteur en chef, publiait depuis le 4 août 1938 les planches du Sceptre d'Ottokar, entreprise achevée le 10 août 1939. L'oeuvre qui est aujourd'hui mise en vente, d'une rareté absolue, se situe donc au coeur du mythe hergéen, à une époque où le maître assumait encore toutes les étapes de création de ses bandes dessinées, sans l'assistance d'un studio. Cette image forte, qui représente notamment Tintin et le roi de Syldavie Muskar XII, met à l'honneur un Milou héroïque qui vient déposer la sceptre disparu aux pieds du souverain, le sauvant ainsi d'une humiliation publique et d'une déchéance programmée. Ce coup d'éclat du plus fidèle compagnon de Tintin annonce la fin proche des projets d'annexion fomentés par la Bordurie voisine, soutenue par les membres d'une conjuration implantée aux plus hauts degrés de l'État syldave. La pièce, qui a été dédicacée par l'auteur en 1975, est reproduite en page 403 du tome 3 de Hergé, Chronologie d'une oeuvre, par Philippe Goddin. Elle est accompagnée d'un certificat d'authenticité délivré par la Fondation Hergé et signée par Philippe Goddin, de même qu'un exemplaire du Petit Vingtième n°29.

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2014-12-14

JOHN LENNON HANDWRITTEN LYRICS TO BEATLES' SONG 'NOWHERE MAN'

JOHN LENNON HANDWRITTEN LYRICS TO BEATLES' SONG 'NOWHERE MAN' 1965 A piece of paper with John Lennon's handwritten lyrics to the Beatles' song 'Nowhere Man.' Penned in black ballpoint ink, the manuscript reads in full: 1) He's a real Nowhere Man Sitting in his nowhere land Making all his nowhere plans for nobody Nowhere Man please listen You don't know what your [sic] missing Nowhere Man the world is at your command 2) Doesn't have a point of view Knows not where he's going to Isn't he a bit like you and me Nowhere Man don't worry Take your time don't hurry Leave it all till [sic] somebody else lends you a hand 3) He's as blind as he can be Just sees what he wants to see Nowhere Man can you see me at all? This is not a work-in-progress set of lyrics, rather it is the finished song that Lennon neatly wrote out and then used during the recording session at Abbey Road Studios in October 1965. 'Nowhere Man' is considered by many to be one of Lennon's most important songs lyrically as it represents a turning point in the evolution of The Beatles. It was their first song not directly dealing with romantic love and it opened the doors for the Beatles (as well as numerous other groups) to address more serious and poignant issues in pop songs. It is no surprise that Lennon composed this song alone; the subject matter of alienation and sadness is typical of many of his compositions. When asked about the song, he said it was about himself and that he was the 'Nowhere Man.' Although John Lennon seems like the antithesis of a 'Nowhere Man' now, knowing that he sometimes felt like this just adds another dimension to his already complex legend. 10 x 7 inches Please note the paper has been folded three times, has tea stains in the lower left-hand corner and has slight staining throughout, though the handwriting is not affected.

  • USAUSA
  • 2003-11-18

HERGÉ Georges REMI dit 1907 – 1983

HERGÉ Georges REMI dit 1907 – 1983 LES BIJOUX DE LA CASTAFIORE Encre de Chine pour la planche 2 de cet album publié en 1963 aux éditions Casterman et prépublié le 11 juillet 1961 dans le Journal Tintin n°28. Signé et encadré. Rare planche enrichie d'une belle dédicace. Il est à noter que les planches d'après guerre sont rarissimes. 47,7 x 35,5 cm. Avec cette aventure, opéra déconcertant dans un château Grand Siècle traditionnellement habité par la symétrie, la ligne claire a décidé de nous en faire voir de toutes les couleurs. Cette mise en abyme que constitue Les Bijoux de la Castafiore montre des versants inattendus de la philosophie graphique d'Hergé, typiques de la deuxième partie de son œuvre. La synergie entre les entités qui définissent l'architecture des aventures de Tintin est toujours bien présente, mais Hergé, qui a pris beaucoup de recul, s'interroge sur les enjeux de son travail et sur le destin de ses personnages, réunis ici pour un récital qui est une illusion lyrique remarquablement réussie, une schizophrénie permanente où s'entrecroisent différents leitmotivs qui mettent en question la linéarité apparente de la bande dessinée. Hergé privilégie la dimension réflexive de son dessin, il prolonge la démarche conceptuelle et les espaces abstraits de Tintin au Tibet dans une simplification souveraine, qui se dissimule très habilement sous un classicisme bien trop sage. La ligne claire est une pure spéculation, le mythe est mis à l'épreuve, dessin et récit se complaisent dans un désordre savamment mis en scène, et ils finissent par s'égarer, tout comme le lecteur, dans les reflets du miroir. Tintin et le capitaine Haddock, présents à toutes les cases, se complètent et s'accordent, et la structure de la planche repose entièrement sur cet échange et sur l'alternance entre ordre et agitation. Le dessin et le regard d'Hergé ont évolué en parallèle : sans doute est-ce l'âge de la maturité, certes différent par rapport aux vibrations minimalistes originelles, mais tout aussi séduisant. Car ce dialogue imagé entre les deux personnages est le symbole de la sophistication des aventures de Tintin et de l'élargissement de son microcosme. Au sein de cet univers, où le héros a abandonné sa solitude mais reste toujours le point central autour duquel gravitent les énergies, Haddock joue un rôle important : il est le contrepoint graphique et rythmique de Tintin. Cette planche le démontre à merveille. Hergé cherche constamment l'équilibre entre les espaces blancs — le décor très précis, tel qu'il est dessiné ici, avec les arbres et surtout le feuillage — et la ligne encrée des personnages, tout en flexibilité. Que ce soit pour marquer la surprise et la colère de Haddock, ou la retenue de Tintin, la plume du dessinateur n'hésite pas un instant sur la voie à emprunter. À cet égard, la dernière case de la planche est une parfaite illustration de son style : Tintin ne court pas, il est suspendu dans un espace graphique qu'il domine sans ostentation, et il incarne à lui seul le raffinement de la ligne claire. Les Bijoux de la Castafiore dans tout leur éclat. Estimation 250 000 - 350 000 € Sold for 404,480 €

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2014-11-22

Superb Babe Ruth professional model baseball bat autographed by Ruth

Superb Babe Ruth professional model baseball bat autographed by Ruth and Lou Gehrig c.1934-35 (PSA ñGU 10î). Many fine objects of rarity often lack accompanying provenance or history. It is not to say that this scenario in any way deems an item to be not worthy of appreciation. However, when a significant item is uncovered with an overwhelming amount of history and identifying characteristics the degree of separation between it and inferior examples is clear. As such, we offer a Louisville Slugger 125 model bat measuring 35" long and weighing 36.9oz. Exceptional usage wear is evident throughout including ball and rack marks. Grain swelling to the upper hitting surface, appropriate for a left handed batter, and scoring of the handle, done to aid in grip, are trademark characteristics and ideal traits in a Ruth game bat. Louisville Slugger centerbrand and facsimile signature stampings remain pronounced and intact. On the back side of the barrel reside the signatures of the most famed pair of professional baseball players in American history. Both Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig have signed the bat in black fountain pen rating 8/9 out of 10. It is the only Babe Ruth game used bat documented to have been autographed by both Ruth and Gehrig. Unlike most game used bats with no source or provenance the offered exemplar lays claim to an unparalleled chain of ownership having originated from the collection of George D. Donnelly. Donnelly was a Minor League player, Sunset League scorekeeper, and Newport Daily News columnist. He amassed an impressive and now well known collection of baseball related artifacts that were first offered by Hunt Auctions in 2005. The bat boasts: 1) Direct provenance 2) Scored handle characteristic of other documented Ruth game used bats 3) Consistent specifications with respect to Hillerich & Bradsby Co. factory records for Ruth 4) Appropriate usage traits including left handed batting indications 5) Period signatures of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig placing the bat into Ruth's hands. It is for these reasons, and others as indicated throughout the lot description, that the offered Babe Ruth bat must be considered to be among the very finest in private hands. Includes LOA from PSA/DNA ("GU 10") and LOA from Hunt Auctions (serving to confirm the history as part of the Donnelly Collection): Sigs. NM, Bat EX. *Please note: Global shipping available.*

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-07-10

2958: GOV: CA HOUSE, BEAR VALLEY SPRGS-AQUA VILLA, STR

.33 acre & 2300 sq. ft. House, Bear Valley Springs-23801 Aqua Villa Rd, CA Gorgeous Property/Investment Great Deal!! Invest Now Before It's Gone! Photo 1 Plat Map Photo 2 Photo 3 PLAT MAP APPRAISED AT:$525,000Fabulous Brand New 4 Bedroom 3 Bathroom House that is located in a beautiful gated community in the Southern California Mountains; Bear Valley Springs. At 2,300 Square Feet, this house is very spacious and the land is gorgeous. This is a scenic property and drive, located only 2 hours from Los Angeles.Custom designed with gourmet kitchen, formal dining, arched hallways, tiled formal entry, stately master suite that opens ontolarge covered patio. Beautiful landscaping completes this model home!* All high bids are subject to builder's confirmation and/or approval. * Address: 23801 Aqua Villa Tehachapi, CA 93561Photos of House: Photo1 Photo2 Photo3 Photo4 Photo5Area photos: Photo1 Photo2 Photo3 Photo4 Photo5 Photo6 Photo7 Photo8 Photo9 Photo10 Photo11 Photo12 Photo13This gorgeous and growing resort, that is Bear Valley Springs, has many great amenities included in your low, yearly association dues: a fabulous golf course, driving range, equestrian center, 24hr. guarded gate, tennis courts, nearby country store and gas station, police and fire station in that community, an Olympic-sized pool, country club, church, administration offices, 2 lakes, great outdoor facilities, and superb schools nearby. Also, enjoy the wondrous views, clean air, and all four spectacular seasons! This is a wonderful community with near-zero crime and friendly neighbors. There is wildlife everywhere!! Also, a great family atmosphere. All this at such a very affordable price!!! This beautiful resort property is located approximately two hours north of Los Angeles. Just outside the mountain town of Tehachapi. Tehachapi is a tourist town that is well known for trains & apples. This location is a major link between Las Vegas, the Sierra Nevada's, and Northern California. This property has a prime location in the mountains —just outside Tehachapi, and near Highways 58 and 14. It is one of this country's most beautiful living areas. Almost 25,000 acres in size, this unique gated community of about 3500 residential Lots encompasses a broad grassland valley, upland meadows, hills, stands of majestic oaks, high mountain pine forests, and an large wilderness area. Thoughtfully located in this beautiful setting are an abundance of leisure time facilities. If you are looking for a cabin in the mountains and like small town neighborhoods, congenial neighbors, mountains filled with oak and pine trees sheltering the most rustic to the most luxurious homes, sprawling ranches and everything in between, all beautifully displayed in the splendor of four wonderfully distinct seasons, then this is the place for you. Its like living in your own national park with your own private roads and security and tranquility.CALL FOR DETAILS: 661-319-6124   * Photos are of general area and may not be of actual property.               Property Profile: GOV FILE # Q-10337 APN Roger-23801 Aqua Villa Rd., Bear Valley Springs, Tehachapi, CA Parcel Size (Approx) .33 acre & 2300 sq. ft. House Location Bear Valley Springs-23801 Aqua Villa Rd, CA TERMS This is a straight sale auction. What you bid is the price for this property plus a one time processing fee of $249 plus a Buyer's Premium of %10 of the Winning Bid amount. Interest Rate N/A if applicable Time-Limit To Build Must Call County Power In Area Phone In Area Water In Area Sewer/Septic Septic Roads Paved Taxes Approximately $200 Dues Approximately $1300/yr Terrain Flat to Rolling Zoning Residential County Phone Notes This is truly a beautiful location! Be sure to send this to a friend! Contact and Payment Information Email info@governmentauction.com Phone (661) 823-1543 Payment Options We accept all major credit cards , personal checks, cashier checks, money orders, and Bank Wire Transfers for the payment of your winning bid. If you're the Winning Bidder, please make a payment within 5 days after this auction has closed otherwise a Non paying bidder report will be filed against the winning bidder. Non Performing Bidder Reports lead to suspension from all online auctions. IMPORTANT Notices & Disclaimers - Please Read Please note that there may be many lots in this subdivision, therefore picture(s) may or may not be of specific lot. All properties are sold “as-is”. Prospective purchasers are urged to examine and research all properties prior to bidding. All information contained in this listing page has come from reliable sources and is accurate to the best of our knowledge. We make no guarantee expressed or implied as to the location, condition, accessibility, terrain, build ability or information contained in this listing. We do guarantee free and clear title with no liens or encumbrances to every property that we sell. Title is conveyed via a Deed on all straight-sale properties. Title is conveyed via land-sales contract on all bid and assume properties. Once your property is paid for in full, your property will be deeded to you via a Deed. All sales contracts are assumable, no pre-payment penalties. Please allow 14-21 days for execution and delivery of all paperwork. Bid and invest with confidence from America’s number one land firm; GovernmentAuction.com. Copyright 2007 GovernmentAuction.com

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-01-13

HERGE LE CRABE AUX PINCES D’OR Encre de Chine et mine de plomb pour

HERGE LE CRABE AUX PINCES D'OR Encre de Chine et mine de plomb pour la couverture de l'album ' Le Crabe aux Pinces d'Or ', publiée aux éditions Casterman en 1942 en version dite ' Grande Image ' et en 1943 pour l'album couleurs. L'album est encore édité de nos jours avec cette couverture. Pièce de musée. Format : 42 x 31 cm. Encadrée. Le Crabe aux Pinces d'Or est à plus d'un titre un album charnière dans l'œuvre d'Hergé. Tout d'abord, cet album voit l'apparition du Capitaine Haddock ; d'abord relégué à un rôle mineur, il s'affirmera comme le compagnon d'aventures le plus fidèle de Tintin et Milou. Seules 6 couvertures d'albums représentent ces 3 personnages de face. Les autres couvertures sont soit axées sur Tintin et Milou seuls ou représentent nos héros de dos, au mieux de profil. Le Crabe aux Pinces d'Or est par ailleurs le premier album à être réalisé dans un contexte de guerre et d'occupation, celui de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale et de l'occupation allemande. L'occupation de la Belgique contraint Hergé à abandonner les aventures de ' Tintin au pays de l'or noir '. La fin du journal ' Le Vingtième Siècle ' et de son supplément amène Hergé à rejoindre le journal d'occupation ' Le Soir-Jeunesse ' dans lequel il publiera à partir du 17 octobre 1940 ' Le Crabe aux pinces d'or '. Tout d'abord à raison d'une double page par semaine puis une demi-feuille pour finir par un strip quotidien de 4 cm sur 17 dans le Journal ' Le Soir ' à partir du 3 septembre 1941. Cette contrainte amènera Hergé à développer une nouvelle technique narrative afin d'entretenir un suspens à la fin de chaque strip et non à la fin de chaque double page comme c'était le cas pour les albums précédents. De par cette contrainte, cet album s'avère être l'un des plus denses, des plus riches, des plus efficaces et des plus rythmés. Le journal Le Soir publiant à 300 000 exemplaires, la visiblité des aventures de Tintin s'en trouve accrue. C'est à partir de la sortie de cet album que les ventes commenceront à décoller. Le succès éditorial ne se démentira pas par la suite. Cet album sera par ailleurs le dernier à paraître en noir et blanc. Estimation 350 000 - 400 000 € Sold for 372,028 €

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2009-03-14

THE MALTESE FALCON, 1941

THE MALTESE FALCON, 1941 The bronze patina lead statue in the image of a falcon; The serial number WB90066 engraved twice on the underside and on the back of the tailfeathers. The statue weighs forty five pounds; slashes to the left of the head and shoulder -11 1/2 in. high. The detective classic with it's moody images and sinister atmosphere, starred Humphrey Bogart as ace-sleuth Sam Spade. Co-starring with Mr. Bogart were Sydney Greenstreet, Mary Astor and Peter Lorre. Debuting director John Huston set the standard of American film noir with this breakthrough style drama. In the film the Falcon, believed to be filled with precious jewels, is slashed on the shoulder by Sydney Greenstreet after an international chase. The Falcon received as much attention off-screen as it did on. During the filming Robert Taplinger of Warner Bros. Studio Publicity department released the following: In a freak accident which injured Humphrey Bogart yesterday, the actor saved Lee Patrick's toes at the expense of his own...The relatively small but disproportionately heavy prop slipped from the actress' hands just as Bogart reached for it. He thrust Ms. Patrick back and tried to jump back himself, but was not quick enough to save the tips of the toes on his left foot...He was able to continue work without a perceptible limp, and to kid Miss Patrick with the crack: "This is what I get for saving you when you tried to give me the bird." Renowned actor, producer and director William Conrad, a close friend of studio chief Jack Warner, received the Falcon during his tenure on the Warner Bros. lot in the 1960s. The bird has rested on a bookshelf in Mr. Conrad's West Coast home ever since. While it is common practice to create several duplicate props that are key to a film, it appears that only two lead birds were ever made. Only one other authentic lead Falcon has ever been known to exist, in the collection of Dr. Gary Milan; it has been exhibited by Warner Bros. in 1992 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at the studio's restrospective anniversary exhibit at the Pompidou Center in Paris. Exhibition: The Falcon from The Estate of William Conrad has been on exhibition at Disney-M.G.M. Studios, Walt Disney World, Orlando Florida; September 13 - November 13, 1994.

  • USAUSA
  • 1994-12-06

The 1940 Buick Phaeton automobile from Casablanca

The 1940 Buick Phaeton automobile from Casablanca Warner Bros., 1942. A 1940 Buick Phaeton Limited model 81C convertible, with 8 cylinder engine, chassis no. 83827860, manual transmission with left hand drive, mileage approximately 42,000, two bench seats, brown exterior with rag top (replaced), original tan interior with some damage. The car has been mechanically restored with a new wiring harness; whitewall tires with side mounts, standard shift on the steering wheel. The most recent owner, however, has done no additional restoration since his purchase of the car. Fresh from service, the car is reported by the vendor to be in driving condition. A copy of the DVD of the film and a reproduction still accompany this lot. Provenance: Purchased by musician Lyle Ritz directly from Warner Bros, 1970; sold Newport Beach Car Collector's Auction, July 11, 1987; offered at Charlotte Collector Car Show, April 3-4, 1993; sold Christie's East, "Television and Film Memorabilia and Posters," June 28, 1995, lot 48. This car looms large in the final act of Casablanca: Claude Rains as Captain Louis Renault drives the car to the airport at gunpoint, with Humphrey Bogart as Rick Blaine in the front, and Ingrid Bergman (Isla Lund) and Paul Henried (Victor Laszlo) in the back seat. Throughout the final moments of the film, Rick, Ilsa, Victor and Louis linger on the airport tarmac next to the Buick Phaeton, and the film's immortal final moments between Rick and Ilsa take place next to the car: Rick: Inside of us, we both know you belong with Victor. You're part of his work, the thing that keeps him going. If that plane leaves the ground and you're not with him, you'll regret it. Maybe not today. Maybe not tomorrow, but soon and for the rest of your life. Ilsa: But what about us? Rick: We'll always have Paris. We didn't have, we, we lost it until you came to Casablanca. We got it back last night. Ilsa: When I said I would never leave you. Rick: And you never will. But I've got a job to do, too. Where I'm going, you can't follow. What I've got to do, you can't be any part of. Ilsa, I'm no good at being noble, but it doesn't take much to see that the problems of three little people don't amount to a hill of beans in this crazy world. Someday you'll understand that. [Ilsa lowers her head and begins to cry] Rick: Now, now... [Rick gently places his hand under her chin and raises it so their eyes meet] Rick: Here's looking at you kid. As a member of the Warner's fleet, this car also appeared in other films of the era, including High Sierra.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-26

Autorretrato a los dieciocho meses

Rosy-cheeked and charming, Fernando Boteros Autorretrato a dieciocho meses is an excellent example of the artists signature style. Inviting, yet enigmatic, the work presents the artists self-fashioning at a crucial moment in his career. Drawing on a variety of influences, he reclaims the techniques of his predecessors and contemporaries to present a work that offers a complex look at his identity.  Although artists in the Western canon have occasionally depicted themselves as children, Boteros Autorretrato a dieciocho meses borrows from this tradition, and then departs from it. Like Albrecht Dürer, who began to gain notoriety as a skilled draughtsman around age 14, Boteros drawings began to appear in Medellíns newspapers in his early teens. In a self-portrait from 1484 (fig. 1), Dürer depicts his thirteen year old self facing outward across the page, keenly observing and gesturing towards something outside our reach. This innovative compositional structure offers a view into the psyche of the subject and activates the space beyond the page. Botero likewise confronts the viewer at an angle, gazing pointedly yet placidly out beyond us and sending the composition out into three dimensional space. However, where Dürer carefully captures his youthful appearance and character in lifelike detail, Botero uses specific iconography and his distinctive representational style to meticulously construct his identity as an artist. Here Botero employs his signature technique of inflation, often used to satirize or lend levity to a composition, to instead dignify and monumentalize the figure. He renders his youthful face in sweet and skillful detail, complete with chubby cheeks and carefully balanced features. Boteros use of active brushstrokes and a softly clashing color palette of marigold, taupe and sage creates a subtle but constant tension and betrays the influence of abstract expressionism on his work of this period. The figure holds the palette and paintbrush, identifying himself as an artist not only by trade but by birth. In a final touch of self-fashioning, he clothes himself in a charming matching coat and cap, alluding to his childhood in Medellín and asserting his identity as a Colombian in a moment when he felt most like an outsider. In this way he uses the masters tools, old and contemporary, to see and create himself in a new way, uniquely his own. Signed and dated 66 lower right; also signed, titled and dated on reverse

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-11-23

Sporting Memorabilia

1954 Topps Baseball Complete Set (250) - # 7 on the PSA Set Registry.  Rank: #7 on the PSA Set registry with an 8.07 GPA. To assemble a complete set of 1950's baseball cards at the upper levels of the grading scale is a task only a small percentage of hobbyists take upon themselves. The PSA Registry has 132 registered sets and less than 10% have a GPA of NM-MT or higher. It is so easy to be taken in by the striking format and vibrant palette of colors set apart by a frosty white three-quarter frame. Overall, each card is a nice example for the grade and a pleasure to view. The set is highlighted by the rookie cards of Al Kaline, Ernie Banks and Hank Aaron plus the two most famous beginning and ending cards of any series of Ted Williams. Includes: Graded - PSA Mint 9: 24 cards, #'s 40, 103, 112, 133, 140, 144, 145, 146, 178, 181, 185, 186, 193, 194, 208, 215, 217, 220, 221, 226, 228, 230, 232, and 237; PSA NM-MT+ 8.5: 1 card, # 97; PSA NM-MT 8: 244 cards, #'s 1 Williams, 2, 3 Irvin, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 Robinson, 11, 12, 13 Martin, 14, 15, 16, 17 Rizzuto, 18, 19, 20 Spahn, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 Mathews, 31, 32 Snider, 33, 34, 35, 36 Wilhelm, 37 Ford, 38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 Ashburn, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 Berra, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 Doby, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 Turley, 86 Herman, 87, 88, 89, 90 Mays, 91, 92, 93, 94 Banks RC, 95, 96, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102 Hodges, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 127, 128 Aaron RC, 129, 130, 131, 132 Lasorda, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139 O'Brien Twins, 141, 142, 143, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166 Podres, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 179, 180, 182, 183, 184, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201 Kaline RC, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 218, 219, 222, 223, 224, 225, 227, 229, 231, 233, 234, 235, 236, 238, 239 Skowron, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249 and 250 Williams; PSA NM 7: 1 card, #126.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-04-23

38: GOV. CA PROPERTY, 1.04 ACRES WITH HOUSE, STR SALE

This is a straight sale auction. What you bid is the price for this property plus processing fee of $249 plus a Buyer's Premium of %10 of the Winning Bid amount. GovernmentAuction.com is the largest company of its kind. We work closely with various government agencies to acquire literally thousands of properties. Once acquired, these properties are liquidated through eBayLiveAuctioneers.com, as well as through our company web site. Our purchase volume allows us to extend savings of up to 70% off to small investors and large corporate entities. Government Auction is proud to present: 1.04 Acres with House, Kern County-BV-House, CA ~Foreclosure~ PLEASE NOTE: Do Not bid on this property if you can not perform on the purchase. If you are the high bidder and do not perform; under eBayLiveAuctioneers.com policy, a Non Performing Bidder Report will automatically be filed. Non Performing Bidder Reports lead to suspension from eBayLiveAuctioneers.com and will be reported to our Collection Agency. FABULOUS DEAL! GORGEOUS PROPERTYBuy only from the No. 1 Land seller online DESCRIPTION : Kern County-BV-House, CA  Fabulous Brand New 3 Bedroom 2 Bathroom House in a beautiful gated community in the Southern California Mountains; Bear Valley Springs. At 1,827 Square Feet, this house is very spacious and the land is over an acre (1.04 acres) and fully landscaped in the front yard. This is a scenic property and drive, located only 2 hours from Los Angeles.Fully custom throughout the house with tile, granite counter tops, and carpet. (Appliances included, also.)360 degree scenic mountain views from every room! Builder must sell immediately! Great home for year-round residence or a weekend/summer get-away.* All high bids are subject to builder's confirmation and/or approval. * Address: 25001 Jacaranda Dr.Tehachapi, CA 93561This gorgeous and growing resort, that is Bear Valley Springs, has many great amenities included in your low, yearly association dues: a fabulous golf course, driving range, equestrian center, 24hr. guarded gate, tennis courts, nearby country store and gas station, police and fire station in that community, an Olympic-sized pool, country club, church, administration offices, 2 lakes, great outdoor facilities, and superb schools nearby. Also, enjoy the wondrous views, clean air, and all four spectacular seasons! This is a wonderful community with near-zero crime and friendly neighbors. There is wildlife everywhere!! Also, a great family atmosphere. All this at such a very affordable price!!! This beautiful resort property is located approximately two hours north of Los Angeles. Just outside the mountain town of Tehachapi. Tehachapi is a tourist town that is well known for trains & apples. This location is a major link between Las Vegas, the Sierra Nevada's, and Northern California. This property has a prime location in the mountains —just outside Tehachapi, and near Highways 58 and 14. It is one of this country's most beautiful living areas. Almost 25,000 acres in size, this unique gated community of about 3500 residential Lots encompasses a broad grassland valley, upland meadows, hills, stands of majestic oaks, high mountain pine forests, and an large wilderness area. Thoughtfully located in this beautiful setting are an abundance of leisure time facilities. If you are looking for a cabin in the mountains and like small town neighborhoods, congenial neighbors, mountains filled with oak and pine trees sheltering the most rustic to the most luxurious homes, sprawling ranches and everything in between, all beautifully displayed in the splendor of four wonderfully distinct seasons, then this is the place for you. Its like living in your own national park with your own private roads and security and tranquility.Area photos: Photo1 Photo2 Photo3 Photo4 Photo5 Photo6 Photo7Photo8 Photo9 Photo10 Photo11 Photo12 Photo13 Photos of the House: Click Map to enlarge size: (if applicable) NO PLAT MAP AVAILABLE MAPS RELATED LINKS NO PLAT MAP AVAILABLEBIDDER ALERT!!Click here to sign up for our FREE BIDDER ALERT EMAILSSee the hot listings first!CLICK HERE SEE OUR OTHER LAND AUCTIONS BY GOVERNMENTAUCTION.COMBefore bidding, please click here for Bid Information-GovernmentAuction.com DETAILS : Kern County-BV-House, CA Gov File #L-25001 APN# 344-283-03-00 Lot 538 Tract 3471 Parcel Size (Exact Dimensions Unknown)1.04 Acres with House Location Kern County-BV-House, CA County phone: (661)868-3485 Loan Interest Rate N/ATerms:This is a straight sale auction. What you bid is the price for this property plus processing fee of $249 plus a Buyer's Premium of %10 of the Winning Bid amount.Power Must Call CountyPhone Must Call CountyWater Must Call CountySewerMust Call CountyRoads Must Call CountyTaxes Must Call CountyTime-Limit To Build Must Call CountyDues Must Call CountyTerrain Flat to rollingZoning 1 Residence Additional Notes This is truly a superb land investment!Processing Fee This is a straight sale auction. What you bid is the price for this property plus processing fee of $249 plus a Buyer's Premium of %10 of the Winning Bid amount. Emailinfo@governmentauction.com We would be happy to assist you in any of your land investment needs. Goodluck in bidding - we hope you get the property of your dreams. This is a great opportunity to invest in Real Estate with a minimum amount of money ''out-of-pocket'' expense. We accept all major credit cards thru Paypal, personal checks (takes longer to ship), cashier checks, money orders, and Bank Wire Transfers for the payment of your winning bid.If you're the Winning Bidder, please make a payment within 5 days after this auction has closed otherwise a Non paying bidder report will be filed against the winning bidder. Non Performing Bidder Reports lead to suspension from eBayLiveAuctioneers.com.All contracts, maps, and information will be ''FEDEXed'' to you, upon completion of paperwork. Take advantage of this great opportunity offered by GovernmentAuction.com. Disclaimers*Please note that there may be many Lots in this subdivision, therefore picture(s) may or may not be of specific Lot. All properties are sold “as-is”. Prospective purchasers are urged to examine and research all properties prior to bidding. All information contained in this listing page has come from reliable sources and is accurate to the best of our knowledge. We make no guarantee expressed or implied as to the location, condition, accessibility, terrain, build ability or information contained in this listing. We do guarantee free and clear title with no liens or encumbrances to every property that we sell. Title is conveyed via a Deed on all straight-sale properties. Title is conveyed via land-sales contract on all bid and assume properties. Once your property is paid for in full, your property will be deeded to you via a Deed. All sales contracts are assumable, no pre-payment penalties. Please allow 14-21 days for execution and delivery of all paperwork. Bid and invest with confidence from America’s number one land firm; GovernmentAuction.com. Copyright © GovernmentAuction.com 1999-2007

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-02-18

Aragorn's sword Andúril, made for Viggo Mortensen, from Lord of the Rings: The Return Of The King

Aragorn's sword Andúril, made for Viggo Mortensen, from Lord of the Rings: The Return Of The King New Line Cinema, 2003. Bright broad tapering blade with central fuller over most of its length, etched on each side with Quenya inscriptions between star, sun and moon motifs, the hilt comprising cross guard and pommel each with beaked pierced and gilt terminal, and black leather-covered grip over beech wood and cord bindings. In accordance with Tolkien's description, the blade is engraved, "Anar. Nányë Andúril I né Narsil i macil Elendilo. Lercuvantan i móli Mordórëo. Isil," which translates as "Sun. I am Andúril who was once Narsil, sword of Elendil. The slaves of Mordor shall flee from me. Moon." The sun and moon symbols are a reference to Narsil, which is a combination of the words Sun and Moon; the pommel is also engraved in Quenya on both sides, "Narsil essenya, macil meletya; Telchar carnéron Návarotessë," which translates as "Narsil is my name, a mighty sword; Telchar made me in Nogrod" ; together with a bespoke flying case and an Advanced U.S one-sheet poster for the film featuring an identical sword. Provenance: The Collection of Sir Christopher and Lady Lee, accompanied by a signed letter of provenance. This sword was designed by the trilogy's conceptual designer John Howe and made by Peter Lyon under Sir Richard Taylor's art direction at Weta Workshop. A master swordsmith, Lyon first began making swords in 1985 and has created weapons for The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Avatar and The Hobbit, in addition to The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Examples of his work reside in the permanent collection of the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds, Great Britain. Andúril, "the flame of the west," is prominently featured in J. R. R. Tolkien's epic novel The Lord Of The Rings as the principal weapon of Aragorn, forged from the shards of the sword Narsil. Narsil was King Elendil's sword, shattered during his battle with Sauron, the hilt subsequently used by Elendil's son Isildur to cut The One Ring from the finger of Sauron. Sir Peter Jackson's film adaptation includes a sword by the same name. The mythical shards of Narsil are said to have remained in the Elvish settlement Rivendell for over 3000 years until Arwen, who prophecies Aragorn's legacy, persuades her father Elrond to reforge the sword and present it to Aragorn, who renames it Andúril. Using the power of Andúril, Aragorn is able to bring forth the Dead Men of Dunharrow to fight alongside him and defeat Sauron's Orcs. The prophecy comes to fruition and with the sword, Aragorn is victorious. He is rewarded with his rightful title, King Elessar, thirty-fifth King of Gondor and the first High King of the Reunited Kingdom. This is the first time a hero sword Andúril from the critically acclaimed Lord of The Rings trilogy has appeared at auction. According to Weta Workshop, this sword was one of only four made for use by Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn in Sir Peter Jackson's adaptation of The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King. As a hero props it was made for close-up visuals and not used for battle scenes. This sword was presented by Sir Peter Jackson to Sir Christopher Lee in gratitude for his learned knowledge of J. R. R. Tolkien's work and invaluable input during the production of The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. The Return of The King still retains the record for the greatest ever clean sweep at the Academy Awards®, receiving an award for each of its eleven nominations in 2004. Overall length: 53 1/2 in.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-25

Steve McQueen's iconic racing suit from Le Mans

Steve McQueen's iconic racing suit from Le Mans National General, 1971. A complete costume comprising a Hinchman cream-colored racing jacket two piece race suit with distinctive orange and blue stripes on down the front and Gulf, Firestone, and Chronograph Heuer patches sewn on the chest and "Michael Delaney" embroidered in blue script on the right breast, a Hinchman Nomex patch on the right shoulder, a Gulf patch on the back, a faded area on the left sleeve where the American flag patch would have been fixed, a zipper down the center with Velcro fastenings to collar and waist and fitted elastic cuffs and possible areas of production simulated blood markings to the chest and right arm. Together with matching cream-colored trousers and the original flame retardant undergarments including the visible protective cream turtleneck sweater, labelled "Atlas Flame Beater." Accompanied by a copy of the film. Provenance: Accompanied by a letter from the consignor stating that the costume was given to him by the head of Italian film production company Titanus once filming was complete. The consignor was the head of typography for a film poster printing company used by Titanus and his company produced the Italian posters for Le Mans. This lot and lot 246 have remained with the family in Italy ever since. Undoubtedly one of Steve McQueen's most recognizable costumes, this racing suit was one of a group worn throughout the making of the film, with three known to remain today. Although not a huge box-office success, it has become a cult classic among car enthusiasts. McQueen was famously quoted as saying about himself "I'm not sure whether I'm an Actor who races or a Racer who acts," and during his lifetime McQueen and the sport of motor car racing become synonymous. He started out racing bikes to earn an extra income before he became an actor and this passion never left him. Over the years he amassed a huge collection of motorcycles, cars, and automobilia and would partake in his hobby at any opportunity. He loved racing in particular as it gave him a sense of freedom, saying of the pastime, "...it gave me a fresh identity. I was no longer just an actor, I was a guy competing. And it was really important to me to have this separate identity."

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-11-24

A Marilyn Monroe suit from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

A Marilyn Monroe suit from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes Twentieth Century-Fox, 1953. Gray wool jacket with cream-colored embroidered linen collar, wired so that it stands, hook-and-eye and black button closure at the center, fitted at the hips, with partial gray crepe lining; together with a matching knee-length pencil skirt with a navy grosgrain waistband and buttons that attach to the jacket (to prevent the skirt from moving when Monroe danced), and a small slit in the back, bearing a bias label inscribed in black ink, "1-69-1194 M. Monroe A-698-40." Monroe, as Lorelei Lee, wears this suit when she and Dorothy (Jane Russell) go shopping in Paris, the hotel refuses them, and they wind up at a sidewalk café, singing "When Love Goes Wrong." Provenance: Purchased by Debbie Reynolds from Fox in 1971; Butterfield & Butterfield, Entertainment Memorabilia, March 14, 2000, lot 5842. A 1949 musical based on a novel by Anita Loos, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was initially purchased by Fox as a vehicle for Betty Grable. However in light of Grable's waning popularity and comparatively high salary (almost ten times Monroe's), studio head Darryl Zanuck decided to cast the starlet Monroe instead, borrowing Jane Russell from RKO to serve as her costar. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was a massive success and 1953 became Monroe's breakout year. She and Jane Russell put their handprints in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theater to celebrate the film's premiere, Monroe appeared on the cover of Photoplay and received its Fastest Rising Star award, and also appeared on the cover of the inaugural issue of Playboy. A report by leading costume conservator Cara Varnell is available upon request.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-11-24

FRANQUIN André (1924 - 1997) GASTON LAGAFFE Encre de Chine et écoline

FRANQUIN André (1924 - 1997) GASTON LAGAFFE Encre de Chine et écoline de couleur pour la couverture de l'album « Des Gaffes et des Dégâts », 6ème album de la série, publié en 1968 aux Editions Dupuis. Signée. 30 x 24 cm. Bel encadrement. Pièce de musée. Première et seule couverture d'album en couleur et au format A4 pour cette série. C'est également le premier album composé de gags en 4 strips, signe de l'importance qu'a pris cette série au sein du journal Spirou. Un certificat d'authenticité signé par Isabelle Florence Franquin et daté du 20 décembre 2009 sera remis à l'acheteur. Album-clef de la série puisque 1968 correspond à l'arrêt par Franquin de la série Spirou au profit exclusif de la série Gaston. C'est également cette même année que Franquin se sépare de son jeune collaborateur, Jidéhem. C'est le premier album de Gaston que Franquin réalisera seul. C'est également avec cet album que naît le Gaffophone qui est l'objet central de la couverture ici présentée. C'est pour finir avec cet album qu'apparaît pour la dernière fois le personnage de Fantasio. Ce n'est pas un hasard si le gag de la couverture correspond à la chute du portrait de Fantasio dont Gaston s'affranchit définitivement et avec une joie non dissimulée. Cette couverture est donc pleine de sous-entendus et exprime très clairement tous ces changements majeurs dans la vie et la carrière de l'artiste. Indian ink and Ecoline watercolours for the cover of the comic book " Des Gaffes et des Dégâts ", sixth comic book of the series, published in 1968 by Editions Dupuis. Signed. Quality framing. Museum quality. First and sole comic book cover in colour and size A4 for this series. It's also the first comic book made with jokes in 4 strips, showing this series rising importance in the Spirou journal. A certificate of authenticity by Isabelle Florence Franquin, dated December 29th, 2009 will be delivered to the purchaser. Most significant comic book of the series, because in 1968 Franquin stopped working on the Spirou series to work exclusively for this of Gaston. Franquin split up in the same year the collaboration with young Jidéhem. Therefore it's the first Gaston comic book Franquin executed alone. Also with this comic book was born the Goffophone, which is in focus of the here presented cover. In this comic book appears also for the last time the character Fantasio. So it's no coincidence that the cover's joke corresponds at the downfall of Fantasio's portrait, depicting Gaston finally released and in undisguised joy. Implying many allusions this cover clearly shows all major changes in the artist's life and career. Estimation 150 000 - 200 000 € Sold for 315,171 €

  • FRAFrankreich
  • 2010-03-13

Circa 1919-22 walter johnson washington senators road jersey

Walter Johnson: “The Big Train” Hailing from tiny Weiser, Idaho, 19 year old Walter Johnson was signed by the lackluster Washington Senators to shore up their pitching woes. The Senators needed a shot in the arm. After all, the American League team had losing records in each year since they joined the league in 1902. Initial expectations of the young man some called a country boy was mixed. On the one hand, team officials were overjoyed when they received news that Walter had pitched 75 scoreless innings in the Idaho State League without giving up a single run. On the other hand, one of their more cynical scouts thought that trying to tame the pitchers fast ball in the big leagues was like going on “a wild goose chase”. However, fate blessed not only the Capital City but anyone who loved the game of baseball when Walter came to the District of Columbia to hone his skill on the mound in 1907. Sure he spent each of his magnificent seasons with only one team, the Washington Senators, but he, in a sense, belonged to all. He became, simply, the number one baseball pitching star in a galaxy of stars with names revered a century later, names like Cy Young, Grover “Old Pete” Alexander and Christy Mathewson. By the time “The Big Train” finished his spectacular playing career, he had notched 416 victories backed by a generally weak hitting team with 110 of them by shutout, struck out over 3,500 batters and led his team to a Worlds Championship. The modest gentleman became an idol to millions nationwide. Walter Johnson, the greatest right handed pitcher of them all, was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1936, among the first class of men selected for baseball’s greatest honor. “Swat” In late 1922 Eric “Swat” Erickson retired to his farm in the small town of Jamestown, New York after concluding a solid seven-year career in Major League Baseball.  The crafty right-handed pitcher appeared in 145 games in the “bigs” winning 40 and losing 50 as a member of the New York Giants, Detroit Tigers and Washington Senators. When Erickson stepped out of the baseball limelight and settled back into the “country life” of farming and raising his family, he brought home to Jamestown memories and stories of having played with and against some of the greatest baseball players of the first quarter century. Among those recollections recorded in an interview by his hometown newspaper, in the 1970’s Erickson stated unequivocally ”Ruth was the greatest slugger of them all, don’t ever let anyone tell you any different, but Walter Johnson was the greatest pitcher.” Few could offer such an appraisal with better perspective. From 1919-1922 Eric Erickson and Walter Johnson had the privilege of each other’s company as friends and teammates with the Washington Senators. Erickson a solid contributor in his own right to the Senators pitching staff, witnessed Johnson at the height of his greatness from a vantage unlike any other. Their time together with the Senators coincided with the twilight of Johnson’s reign as the games dominant hurler. In Johnson, Erickson bore witness to a living legend. The impression was lasting.  In addition to the memories from which countless tales would be spun, Erickson carried home with him to Jamestown in 1922 other career mementos, which he tucked away in the farmhouse he had built himself by hand. The modest accumulation included typical objects such as photographs, programs, articles, pins and ticket stubs. One other item made its way back to the farm from Washington – an item that today stands as one of the games greatest treasures. For Erickson, in spite of having worn many different jerseys throughout his professional baseball career, carried home with him a single jersey, and it was not his own. “A Washington Monument” After more than 80 years of preservation by Eric “Swat” Erickson and his heirs, we are privileged to present the only known game worn Walter Johnson jersey in private hands. Manufactured by Spalding, the grey pinstriped road jersey is constructed of thick flannel. Underneath the manufacturers tag in the collar in Johnson’s last name in finely scripted red stitching. A heavily embroidered “W” adorns each of the three-quarter length sleeves in black. The present state appears to have changed little since it was last worn by Walter. Every aspect of the jersey is unchanged, including all six original buttons. Its condition is superb, with substantial, but not excessive wear that gives it ideal display quality. Outside of the only other known Walter Johnson jersey that resides in the National Baseball Hall of Fame, this is the finest object ever discovered related to “The Big Train” and it is a national monument to baseball greatness. Articles of provenance include: A notarized letter of provenance form Eric Erickson’s granddaughter. Copies of original newspaper articles related to Erickson and Johnson. Copies of photographs of Erickson and Johnson, including two of them together (shown). A comprehensive LOA from Dave Grob, Dave Bushing and Troy Kinunen of MEARS (Grade A10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24

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